100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 27, 2013 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2013-09-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

2 - Friday, September 27, 2013

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com
e 1Midgan 1ail
420 Maynard St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1327
www.michigandaily.com
ANDREWWEINER KIRBY VOIGTMAN
Editor in Chief Business Manager
734-418-4115 ext. 1252 734-418-4115 ext. 1241
anweiner@michigandaily.com kvoigtman@michigandaily.com

TOP LEFT Demolition crews
tear down buildings on Division
Street near Blimpy Burger Tues-
day. (Virginia Lozano/Daily)
BOTTOM LEFT Business
sophomore Angie Pae works
on her personal writing while
participating in the Grout Write
Ott ut Espresso Royule on Stut
Street Tuesday. (Erin Kirkland/
Daily)
RIGHT LSA senior Nick Otto
participates in the MHacks
Hackathon with virtual reality
goggles at Michigan Stadium
Friday, (Ruby Wallau/Daily)

734-418-4115opt.3
Corrections
corrections@michigandaily.comn
Arts Section
arts@michigandailyxcom
Sports Section -
sports@michigandaily.com
Display Sales
dailydisplay@gmailcom
Online Sales
onlineads@michigandaily.com

news@michigadaily.com
letters to thetEditor
tothedaity@michigandaily.com
Editorial Page
opinion@michigandaily.com
Photography Section
photo@michigandaily.com
Classified Sales
classified@michigandaiy.com
Finance
finance@michigandaiy.com

I

CRIME NOTES

Staff infection
WHERE: Von Voigtlander
Women's Hospital
WHEN: Wednesday at
about 1:30 p.m.
WHAT: University Police
reported that cash and an
iPod were stolen from an
employee's locker. A staff
member was arrested and
released in relation to the
theft.
Packed pack
WHERE: Chemistry
Building
WHEN: Thursday at
about 5:15 p.m.
WHAT: A backpack with a
laptop and headphones was
stolen Thursday, University
Police reported. The back-
pack was reportedly stolen
when it was left unattended
in a lower-level room
between land 5 p.m. There

Too hard to
say no
WHERE: Northwood III
WHEN: Wednesday at
about 6 p.m.
WHAT: A resident report-
ed that after being solicited
to purchase goods she gave
the subject money. The
subject is said to be a white
female with short brown
hair.
Rack-jacked
WHERE: 400 Block of
State St.
WHEN: Wednesday at
about 1:30 p.m.
WHAT: A bicycle was
reportedly stolen from
the bike racks near Mason
Hall, University Police
reported. It was reportedly
stolen between 9 and 11:30
a.m. There are no suspects.

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES
Environment Mongolian
and health festival

WHAT: A conference on
environmental law and pub-
lic health will cover environ-
mental protection and public
health values, pollution and
others issues.
WHO: Michigan Law Envi-
ronmental Law and Policy
Program
WHEN: Today from 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m.
WHERE: South Hall
President
search forum
WHAT: The public forum is
seeking input on the search
for the next president.
WHO: Campus Information
Centers
WHEN: Today from 5:30
p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
WHERE: Ross School of
Business

WHAT: The festival will
feature three games: horse
racing, wrestling, and
archery, as well as a photo
booth.
WHO: Center for Human
Growth and Development
WHEN: Today from 1 p.m.
to 5 p.m.
WHERE: Diag
Pres. forum
WHAT: The public forum is
seeking input on the search
for the next president.
WHO: Campus Information
Centers
WHEN: Today from 5:30
p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
WHERE: Ross School of
Business
CORRECTIONS
. Please report any
error in the Daily to
corrections@michi-
gandaily.com.

T HREE T HINGS YOU
SHOULD KNOW TODAY
California passed a law
protecting celebrities'
children from paparaz-
zi. According to Today
Entertainment, Governor
Jerry Brown signed the bill
on Tuesday. Hollywood par-
ents Halle Berry and Jennifer
Garner actively supported the
bill.
Wayne State University
will hike its tuition by
8.9 percent for the 2013-
14 fiscal year. This comes
after the state has witnessed
a 11.35-percent decrease in
funding for higher education.
a FOR MORE, SEE PAGE 4
Burger King released a
new item on their menu
called "Satisfries."
According to Today Health,
The fries have 20 percent
fewer calories and 30 percent
less fat than regular fries.
They will cost about 30 cents
more per serving.

EDITORIAL STAFF
MatthewSlovin Managing Editor mjslavin@michigandaily.com
Adam Rubenfire Managing News Editor arube@michigandailycom
SENIOR NEWS EDITORS: Alicia Adamczyk, Peter Shahin, K.C. Wassman, Taylor Wizner
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITORS: Ariana Assaf, Jennifer Calfas, Hilary Crawford, an
Dillingham, Will Greenberg, Sam Gringlas, Matt Jackonen, Rachel Premack, Stephanie
Shenouda, Christy Song
Melanie Kruvelis and opinioneditors@michigandaiy.com
Adrienne Roberts Editorial PagetEditors
SENIOR EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS: Dan Wang, Derek Wolfe
ASSISTANT EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS: Aarica Marsh, Megan McDonald
Everett tank and
Zach Helfand ManagingsportsEditors sportseditors@michigandailycom
SENIOR SPORTS EDITORS: Alejandro Zuniga, Jeremy Summitt, Neal Rothschild, Rajat
Khare,DanielWasserman,LizVukelich
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITORS: Greg Garno, Alexa Dettlebach, Daniel Feldman, Erin
Lennon, Lev Fache, Max Cohen
Kayla Upadhyaya ManagingArtsEditor kaylau@michigandaily.com
SENIOR ARTS EDITORS:ElliotAlpern, Brianne Johnson, John Lynch,Anna Sadovskaya
ASSISTANT ARTS EDITORS: John Bohn, Sean Czarnecki, Max
Radin,Akshay Seth,KatieSteen,StevenTweedie
AdamGlanzmanand
Terra Molengraff Managing PhotoEditors photo@michigandaily.com
SENIOR PHOTO EDITORS: Teresa Mathew, Todd Needle
nSSISoenTHOOEI nOR PathrinenPekala,PaulSherman,
Mcoenie a,,,in, RbyWal, aroickarron
Kristen Cleghornand
Nick CruzManaging Design Editors design@michigandaily.com
HaleyGOldberg Magazine Editor statement@michigandaily.com
DEPUTY MAGAZINE EDITOR: Paige Pearcy
Josephine Adams and
Tom McBrien Copychiefs copydesk@michigandaily.com
SENIOR COPY EDITORS: Jennie Coleman, Kelly McLauglin
Austen Hufford Online Editor ahufford@michigandaily.com
BUSINESS STAFF
Amal MUzaffar Digital Accounts Manager
Doug Soloman University Accounts Manager
Leah Louis-Prescott Classified Manager
Lexi DerasmO Local Accounts Manager
Hillary Wang National Accounts Manager
Ellen Wolbert and Sophie Greenbaum ProductionManagers
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) i is pubished Mondaythrough Friday during the fall and
winterterms by students at the University of Michigan.One copy is availablelfree of charge
to all readers. Additional copies maybe picked up at the Daily's office for $2. Subscriptions for
fal term, starting in september, via U.S.mail are $110. Winterr tm (Januarythrough April) is
$115, yearlong (September through April) is $195. University affilates are subject to a reduced
subscriptionrate. On-campussubscriptionsforfalltermare$35.Subscriptionsmestbe prepaid.
The Michigan Daily is amember of The Associated Pressand The AssociatedcCollegiate Press.

a

Confucius Institute hosts
cultural fashion show

Three-day exhibit
features Chinese
designer Xu Rui
By ARIANA ASSAF
Daily StaffReporter
Thursday through Saturday,
the University of Michigan's
Confucius Institute is bringing
a unique multimedia fashion
exhibit to the Michigan Union.
Chinese designer Xu Rui cre-
ated the exhibit, "To See the
Invisible." It focuses on express-
ing the 'unseen' in Chinese cul-
ture by emphasizing form in
the evolution of and contrast
between traditional Chinese
clothing.
Apart from traditional dis-
play, the designs were shown at
a fashion show Thursday cho-
reographed by Zang Cunliang, a
renowned member of the exper-
imental Chinese physical the-

ater community.
Rui's designs incorporate the
work of Jiang Kinor, an asso-
ciate professor at Hong Kong
Polytechnic University who
combines materials research
and design into his work. His
metalized textiles lend a holo-
graphic, 3-D effect to each piece,
allowing them to take on new
visual attributes when viewed
from different angles.
Rui, who hails from Beijing,
is a professor and director of the
fashion design department at
the China Central Academy of
Fine Arts and an active designer
and lecturer.
The idea of the exhibit was
sparked by her interest in the
inheritance of Han clothing
and the exploration of culture
behind traditional Chinese cos-
tumes.
Rul's motivation, she
explained through a translator,
was her search for a "symbol of
Chinese cultural essence" that

came from a different, more
spiritual place than the normal
historical and academic repre-
sentations.
She hopes University students
who attend the exhibit will real-
ize the importance of fashion
and international culture.
"Fashion in China is not
restricted to the narrow geo-
graphical region and the unilat-
eral folk custom," Rui said. "It
is an important branch of world
culture with highly condensed,
unique qualities. It deeply influ-
ences the cultural system of the
world."
Students, professors and com-
munity members have filtered in
and out of the exhibit already.
Associate Prof. Emily Wil-
cox, who visited the exhibit
Thursday, said Rui's designs are
reminiscent of current trends in
China.
"(Tight-calved pants are)
really common to see in China,
and now I'm wondering if that's
where the fad came from, this
research into Chinese culture,"
Wilcox said.
LSA sophomore Erica Gray,
added that she had seen many
aspects of Rui's designs before
but never realized they origi-
nated in China.
"I've seen a lot of people in
the U.S. wearing that, too, so it
was fun to learn about the his-
tory along with the fashion."
FOLLOW
US ON
TWITTER
@michigandaily

Onlookers watch as a large plume of smoke rises above an abandoned building on the corner of Martin and Pittsburgh
Roads on Detroit's west side Thursday.
Detroit granted money to
destroy vacant buildings

--.5 OK

U.S. Government
gives city more
than $100 million
DETROIT (AP) - The U.S.
government directed more than
$100 million in grants Thursday
to help bankrupt Detroit tear
down vacant buildings and spur
job growth, but the help falls far
short of the wider bailout some
city leaders had sought.
Gene Sperling, chief econom-
ic adviser to President Barack
Obama, said the administration
scrounged through the federal
budget and found untapped
money that "either had not
flowed or had not gotten out or
not directed to the top priorities
for Detroit."
But considering the Motor
City is at least $18 billion in debt,
it will take a far larger infusion of
cash or historic deals with bond
holders, insurance companies
and other creditors to correct
the problem.
Sperling will join on Friday in
Detroit three other top Obama
aides - U.S. Attorney General
Eric Holder, Transportation
Secretary Anthony Foxx and
HUD Secretary Shaun Dono-
van. The closed meeting also

will include city and state lead-
ers, and the emergency manager
leadingDetroit through the larg-
est municipal bankruptcy in U.S.
history.
The Obama administration
repeatedly has signaled it won't
offer a massive federal bailout
like the one credited with help-
ing rescue Chrysler and General
Motors.
"There is not goingto be abail-
out," Democratic U.S. Sen. Carl
Levin told The Associated Press
on Wednesday. "We have enough
problems with the federal defi-
cit. We need to be creative and
look at existing programs. There
are still some funds there."
The funding announced by
Sperling will include $65 mil-
lion in Community Develop-
ment Block Grants for blight
eradication, $25 million in a
public-private collaboration for
commercial building demolition
and nearly $11 million in funds
to ensure working families can
live in safe neighborhoods.
Holder will announce $3 mil-
lion that, in part, will be used to
hire new police officers. About
$25 million also will be expe-
dited to Detroit to hire about 140
firefighters and buy new gear.
"It wasn't enough to try and
free the resources," Sperling

said. "We had to make sure they
are well-used and targeted."
In addition, Kevyn Orr, the
city's emergency manager
appointed by Gov. Rick Snyder,
has told the city's two municipal
retirement systems he wants to
freeze Detroit's pension plans
and move to a 401(k)-style sys-
tem.
The gathering follows a series
of meetings with the White
House to plot ways to pull
Detroit from a fiscal pit that this
summer made it the largest U.S.
city to file for bankruptcy pro-
tection.
Detroit has had a poor record
in making sure grant money is
used properly and even spent at
all.
In 2011, Mayor Dave Bing
fired the director of the city's
Human Services Department
after an internal investigation
revealed $200,000 intended
for poor residents was spent on
office furniture for staff mem-
bers.
The following year, his office
had to scramble to use about
$20 million in grants that had
been left sitting for demolitions
of thousands of vacant houses.
The city's Police Department
also allowed a $400,000 grant to
lapse for a new armored vehicle.

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan