100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 24, 2013 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2013-09-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

E-U hid jigan 0aiIj
ON (itIl NItl)I( lj I) ~y' ,[ 1 J'aLNTY-TI I lE EXIS ( 1_~IAI ' El lO~l :\L IIEIO

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

michigandaily.com

FAIR THEE WELL

ADMINISTRATION
University
to demolish
North Hall

ALLISON FARRAND/Daily

Students pack into the Beyster Building to speak with recruiters for the Engineering Career Fair Monday.

FACULTY GOVERNANCE
Assemblyupsetby search

Home of ROTC will
be razed to make
way for new building
By ARIANA ASSAF
Daily StaffReporter
South Quad Residence Hall
might look a bit rough right now,
but another building on campus
will have it worse.
North Hall, the building that
currently is home to the Univer-
sity's ROTC programming, is set
for demolition, pending approval
by the Board of Regents.
Operations Officer Wayne Doyle
said the building is being torn
down because repairs to the cur-
rent building would be too costly.
University spokesman Rick
Fitzgerald said the building, locat-
ed on North University Avenue
near the C.C. Little Building and
the Museum of Natural History, is
"more than a little old," University
spokesman Rick Fitzgerald said.
North Hall was built between
1899 and 1900 as the Homeopathic
Hospital Building, according to
records from the Bentley Histori-
cal Library. It has housed ROTC
programs since 1940.
Fitzgerald said plans for demo-
lition and reconstruction of North

Senate Assembly
0 upset about lack of
own members on
search committee
By YARDAIN AMRON
For theDaily
At their meeting at Palmer
Commons Monday, members of
the Senate Assembly expressed
concern that the University's
Board of Regents didn't appoint
any assembly members to the

Presidential Search Advisory
Committee.
The Senate Advisory Com-
mittee on University Affairs - a
nine-member faculty executive
committee elected by the Sen-
ate Assembly - passed a reso-
lution in February 2012 urging
the regentsto include represen-
tatives from the assembly on
the committee. When members
were announced in July 2013,
no assembly members were
among the names
Over the summer, SACUA
responded with another reso-
lution expressing their "disap-

pointment" with the regents'
decision. Assembly members
expressed a similar sentiment
Monday.
"It doesn't start off in very
good light, given the fact that
there's no representation of
central governance on the
Search Advisory Committee,"
said Prof. John Lehman, the
SACUA secretary. "It sends a
sort of message as to what the
conversations are going to be
about in the interviews."
SACUA member Prof. Scott
Masten said the regents gave
no explanation as to why the

assembly was not included in
the committee.
Monday, University spokes-
man Rick Fitzgerald declined
to comment about why no Sen-
ate Assembly members were
included.
In lieu of representation
on the committee, members
proposed that the assembly
establish a strong channel of
communication with the new
University president from the
onset.
But the window of influence
is apparently small. Lehman,
See ASSEMBLY, Page 3

COMMUNITY
Entreprenuer
" co-op formed
off-campus

C LOSE -K N IT
1 0 Ik

Hall will be up for approval by the
University's Board of Regents next
month. Therefore, he could pro-
vide only limited information at the
time.
"It's been in development for a
long time," Fitzgerald said. "It's a
project that will try to solve mul-
tiple problems on campus."
Lt. Col. Allana Bryant, a profes-
sor of military science, said ROTC
programs will be relocated in May,
and the building will be torn down
in June. It's not clear where the
ROTC programwillbe held during
construction.
Fitzgerald declined to comment
on the timeline of construction,
but said more information will
become available once the project
is approved.
Nursing junior Meghan Con-
ger, an Army ROTC cadet, said
she spends several hours a week
at North Hall because it's the
meeting place for almost all of her
ROTC activities. She added that
she's disappointed the building
will be taken down, as she thinks
of it as acampus landmark.
"It's a very unique building with
a lot of purpose, and it's a build-
ing that's special to cadets and
midshipmen because it's solely for
ROTC operations," Conger said.
"Not a lot of other students know
about it or can use it."
CAMPUS LIFE
New group
combines
networking
with fitness
Run This Campus
spins off events in
Detroit, Chicago
By CHRISTY SONG
Daily StaffReporter
Is your workout routine get-
ting stale? Give networking out a
chance.
Run This Campus is a new
organization focused on promot-
ing fitness through networking,
or "networking out." Unlike many
athletic and wellness groups,
RTC is focused on collaboration
rather than competition. It also
provides the opportunity for par-
ticipants to engage with commu-
nity leaders, peers and potential
employers.
RTC is based off of an organiza-
tion with operations Detroit and
Chicago called Run This Town,
which was founded in 2012. Usual-
ly 400 to 1,000 people participate
in two sessions a week in those cit-
ies, according to the group's orga-
nizers.
LSA senior Omar Hashwi, for-
mer vice president of the Cen-
tral Student Government, helped
start RTC. The group held its first
meeting on Sept. 17 and will soon
announce inaugural events. Hash-
wi hopes the University's numbers
will reach or surpass the atten-
dance rate of Run This Town.

"My goal is to create a healthier
campus by creating one of the larg-
est collaborative fitness sessions
in the U.S. here at our University,"
Hashwi said.
Run This Town founder Shawn
See FITNESS, Page 3

Former Michigan
linebacker finances
Oxford Rd. house
By ROBERT ARANELLA
Daily StaffReporter
The Creators is a new
co-op in town - and it has a
celebritybenefactor.
The co-op was founded
after Business and LSA
senior Nancy Xiao, a mem-
ber of MPowered, spoke at
an alumni event in Cincin-
nati to generate support for
entrepreneurial projects on
campus. Former Michigan
linebacker Dhani Jones, who
currentlyplays forthe Cincin-
nati Bengals, was intrigued by
her speech and approached
her afterward to talk about
creating a student group to
foster such endeavors.
"On this panel, I remem-
ber talking about this prob-
lem we had on campus, that
we're trying to solve, there
was just no one place to go
to meet like-minded people
who were building great
things," Xiao, the co-op's
general manager, said.
Since the event, Jones and
Xiao have worked together to
form a group that encourages
young entrepreneurs to fol-
low through with their dream
projects. Xiao has attracted
six other students to the
cause and they continue to
have weekly discussions with
Jones to continue growing

the outfit.
The co-op is named for its
mission to create a collabora-
tive environment for students.
The co-op is not a part of
the Inter-Cooperative Coun-
cil and is not registered as a
student group. Xiao said they
decided not to affiliate to avoid
narrowing the project's scope.
"It's not a student organi-
zation. We thought it would
be better if we weren't so
Ann Arbor focused ... we
wanted people to be focused
on our people, not the place,"
Xiao said.
This fall, Jones bought the
group a house located at 631
Oxford Road, a property that
used to be owned by the Uni-
versity's Board of Regents.
The four-story house has two
floors of workstations and
communal areas to foster the
exchange of ideas, and a resi-
dential floor for leadership.
Due to zoning laws, only four
members are able to live in-
house currently as they finish
convertingthe building.
The organization will be
accepting their first group
of new members this fall.
While other clubs accept
students with varying levels
of experience, The Creators
will require more business-
focused qualifications when
considering applicants.
"We're looking for ... peo-
ple that have kind of already
hit that epiphany and have
already started building an
app or selling their first prod-
uct," Xiao said.

LSA sophomore Heather Williams and LSA freshman lii Anuar knit for the homeless at a meeting for Scarves With a
Purpose Monday,
ANN ARBOR
South to get burger oint

Bi
Un

An
Burge
Bu
ficati
Univ
Fores
Th
a 'gr
food-
garne
they
the"
isn't
good,
attem
entir

urgerFi to open "The food service industry
in general is a very wasteful
n space under industry," Heather Stein, the
store's manager, said. "It leaves
tiversity Towers a pretty big carbon footprint.
It's important that we keep
By MAX RADWIN that in mind because ... we can
For theDaily change that. If more people
were more conscientious of sus-
in Arbor, prepare to be tainability, the results would be
erfied. immeasurable."
rgerFi - short for "Burger- Stein said that everything on
on" - will open on South BurgerFi's menu will be made
ersity Avenue near South from scratch. All of the store's
t Avenue on Oct. 1. beef is a proprietary blend of
.e restaurant's belief in Montana, free-range Black
een' business model and Angus cattle, and the resulting
preparation habits has patties will be formed in-house
ered rapid success. But and never frozen, she said.
say their participation in Hand-cut fries and onion rings
better burger movement" will also be made fresh through-
just an attempt to serve out the day.
,healthy food: It's also an "We even tilt our grills so a
apt to set an example for an lot of that grease runs down, so
e industry. you're not just getting a burger

that's sitting in its own fat,"
Stein said.
Even the restaurant's inte-
rior - which evokes the fast-
casual concept of hamburger
stands from the 1950s and 60s
- will be made from recycled
materials: the Coke-themed
chairs are made out of 111 Coke
bottles and the restaurant's pic-
nic tables are made out of 960
milk cartons.
LSA junior Elaine Han, who
admitted she isn't a huge fan of
burgers, said she plans to try the
new restaurant for its green-
consciousness, fresh food and its
proximity to campus.
Stein believes that the res-
taurant will be a strong fit with
Ann Arbor not only because the
city is very "green-conscious,"
but also because BurgerFi's
menu provides a lot of food
See BURGER, Page 3

WEATHER H1I:70
TOMORROW LO: 47

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.
* 4k

NEW ON MICHIGANDAILY.COM
The Wire:'U' creates off-campus housing website
MICHIGANDAILY.COM/BLOGS

INDEX NEWS ............................2 SPORTS......................7
. Vol CXXIII, No.137 OPINION ....................4 CLASSIFIEDS ..................6
2013 TheMichigan Daily ARTS...... ..........S NATIONAL ................. 2
michigondoily.com

4

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan