100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 20, 2013 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2013-09-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

2 - Friday, September 20, 2013

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

MONDAY: TUESDAY: WEDNESDAY: THURSDAY: FRIDAY:
This Week in History Professor Profiles In Other Ivory Towers Alumni Profiles Photos of the W k
LEFT Business sophomore
Jess Vander blows bubbles
during MHealthy Play Day
on Ingalls Mall Tuesday. The4
event was run in partnership
with MHealthy, Rec Sports,
UHS and U-Move in order to
promote healthy and wellness
on campus.
RIGHT Dopesiples, a campus
break dancing group, perform
on the Diag to raise money for
Syrian refugees on Thursday.
(TRACY KO/Daily)

TeeffiIoian 0ailm
420 Maynard St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1327
www.michigandaily.com
ANDREW WEINER KIRBY VOIGTMAN
Editor in Chief Business Manager
734-418-4115 ext. 1252 734-418-4115 ext. 1241
anweiner@michigandaily.com kvoigtman@michigandaily.com

I
4

Newsroom
734-418-41s opt.3
Corrections
corrections@michigandaily.com
Arts Section
arts@michigandaily.com
Sports Section
sports@michigandaiy.com
Display Sales
dailydisplay@gmail.com
Online Sales
onlineads@michigandaily.com

News Tips
news@michigandaily.com
Letters tothe Editor
tothedaily@michigandaily.com
Editorial Page
opinion@michigandaily.com
Photography Section
photo@michigandaiy.com
Classified Sales
classified@michigandaiy.com
Finance
finance@michigandaily.com

CRIME NOTES

CAMPUS]

EVENTS & NOTES
Harmon

Vandals on Crash into me MLK Jr.

the Diag
WHERE: The Diag
WHEN: Around 12:00 p.m.
Wednesday
WHAT: An unknown
subject vandalized an item
that was being used ina
demonstration on the Diag,
University Police reported.
The subject left the area.
Necklace,
necklost
WHERE: Stockwell
Residence Hall
WHEN: Around 1:30 p.m.
Wednesday
WHAT: University Police
report that an unattended
necklace was taken from
a second-floor restroom
between 9:30 and 10 a.m.

WHERE: Simpson St.
WHEN: 9:30 a.m.
Wednesday
WHAT: Two automobiles
collided, University Police
reported. There were no
injuries and the damage is
unknown.
Smokin' and
rollin'
WHERE: Thayer Carport
WHEN: Around 5 p.m.
Wednesday
WHAT: Several subjects
were skateboarding,
University Police reported.
The officer suspected
marijuana use, but no
evidence was found.

eXhibit
WHAT: To celebrate the
life and work of Martin
Luther King Jr. and the
Civil Rights movement,
colleges on North Campus
will launch a year of events.
The first will be a ribbon-
cutting for the "Imaging the
Dream" Exhibit.
WHO: University Library
WHEN: Noon
WHERE: Duderstadt
Center
Free food
for freshmen
WHAT: The Career Center
hopes to meet new fresh-
men at a meet-and-greet
with staff and guests.
WHO: The Career Center
WHEN: Noon to 1:30 p.m.
WHERE: Student Activities
Building

celebrated
WHAT: The Bentley His-
torical Library will focus on
the life of former Michigan
football star Tom Harmon
with a new exhibit.
WHO: Bentley Library
WHEN: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
WHERE: Bentley
Historical Library
HEALTH
conference
WHAT: A day of panels
and events on a variety
of aspects of health and
wellness.
WHO: Taubman College
WHEN: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
WHERE: UMMA
CORRECTIONS
. Please report any
error in the Daily to
corrections@michi-
gandaily.com.

T H REE T HINGS YOU
SHOULD KNOW TODAY
1Pope Francis made
waves by calling for less
focus on gay marraige,
abortion, and contraception
in an extended series of inter-
views that were released by
16 Jesuit journals worldwide,
the New York Times report-
ed Thursday.
The Michigan football
team is in Connecticut
this weekend, trying
to prove that last Saturday's
near-shocker was a mere
fluke.
FOR MORE, SEE SPORTS, PAGE8
Veterans are dying from
accidental overdoses of
narcotic painkillers at
an greater rate than the gen-
eral population, CBS News
reported Thursday. The over-
doses have been attributed to
veterans affairs doctors over-
prescribing the drugs.

EDITORIAL STAFF
Matthew Slovin Managing Editor mjslovin@michigandaily.com
Adam Rubenfire Managing News Editor arube@michigandaily.com
SENIOR NEWS EDITORS: Alicia Adamczyk, Peter Shahin, K.C. Wassman, Taylor Wizner
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITORS: Ariana Assaf, Jennifer Calfas, Hilary Crawford, Ian
Dillinghas Will Greenberg, Sam Gringlas, Matt Jackonen, Rachel Premack, Stephanie
Shenouda, Christy Song
Melanie Kruvelis and opinioneditors@michigandaily.com
AdrienneRoberts Editorial Page Editors
SENIOR EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS: Dan Wang, Derek Wolfe
ASSISTANT EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS: Aarica Marsh, Megan McDonald
Everett Cook and
Zach Helfand Managing SportsEditors sportseditors@michigandaily.com
SENIOR SPORTS EDITORS: Alejandro Zuniga, Jeremy Summitt, Nea Rothschild, Rajat
Khare,DanielWasserman,LizVukelich
uASSNSOSEs ORS: Greg Garno, ADlexa Detebach, Daniel Feldman, Erin
Leno,LeF,eMa ohen~
Kayla Upadhyaya Managing Arts Editor kaylau@michigandaily.com
SENIORARTSEDITORS: ElliotAlpern,BrianneJohnson,JohnLynch,AnnaSadovskaya
ASSISTANTARTSEDITORS: JohnBohn,Sean Czarnecki,Max
Radin, Akshay Seth, Katie Steen, Steven Tweedie
Adam Glanzman and
Terra Molengraff Managing PhotoEditors photo@michigandaily.com
SENIOR PHOTO EDITORS: Teresa MathewTodd Needle
ASsSnANTP OOEDOoRS:EKatherinePekala,PaulSherman,
McKeneeezein, Ruby Wallu, tik Oarron
Kristen Cleghornnand
Nick Cruz Managing Design Editors design@michigandaily.com
HaleyGoldberg Magazine Editor statement@michigandaily.com
DEPUTY MAGAZINE EDITOR: Paige Pearcy
Josephine Adams and
Tom McBrien copy Chiefs copydesk@michigandaily.com
SENIORCOPYEDITORS: Jennie Coleman,KellyMcLauglin
Austen Hufford Online Editor ahufford@michigandaily.com
BUSINESS STAFF
Amal Muzaffar Digital Accounts Manager
Doug Soloman University Accounts Manager
Leah Louis-Prescott Classified Manager
Lexi DerasMo LocalAccounts Manager
Hillary Wang National Accounts Manager
Ellen Wolbert and Sophie Greenbaum Production Managers
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and
w'nter terms by students at the University of Michigan. One copy is available free of charge
to all readers. Additional copies may be picked up at the Daily's office for $2. Subscriptions for
fall termstarting in september,viau.S. mailare $110. Winterterm (January through Apriis
$115 yeanlony ISepembethroghApril) The 1s$195.OUiveresit yheailiates are sebectosga redusse
subscriptisn rse. O-capssubscriptions for fall terer are $351.eubscriptiossmust be prepaid.
TheMichigantDailysis amemberof Te ssoiaed PesandheAesoiae Colleiae Prss.

A

Eight highlights from
the Regents meeting

Union Director 'hopeful'
Starbucks will open Nov.

- - Tn - -- 'n-!-- -

By SAM GRINGLAS
Daily Staff Reporter
1. University President Mary
Sue Coleman opened the Sep-
tember Board of Regents meet-
ing by praising the generosity
of Steven Ross' $200 million
gift and highlighting the world
record crowd at the University
of Notre Dame game, as well as
the first-ever quintuplets born
at the University Hospital.
"We've had a September unlike
anythingI believe we've ever expe-
rienced," Coleman said.
2. James Holloway, Univer-
sity vice provost for global and
engaged education, provided
regents with recent high-
lights of the University's study
abroad programs, as well as
data on the University's inter-
national student population.

"We need students to be saying
to themselves not 'I wonder if I
should go abroad.' We needour stu-
dents to be saying'I wonder when I
will study abroad,'"Holloway said.
3. Construction planning
will begin for a renovation of
the School of Education, which
was built in 1923. Tim Slottow,
the University's executive vice
president and Chief Financial
Officer, said the project is set
for completion in fall of 2015.
"This is long overdue," Slottow
said.
4. Effective Oct. 1, the Divi-
sion of Student Affairs will
be renamed the Division of
Student Life to better convey
the office's core mission when
communicating with organiza-
tions outside the University, E.
Royster Harper, Vice President

of Student Affairs, said.
"We think it will remain with us
in ourfuture efforts in respect to the
capital campaign,"Harper said.
5. The regents also
approved the sale of 51 acres
of property to NSF Interna-
tional, a non-profit organiza-
tion that verifies health and
safety standards, for $3.52
million.
6. Jerry May, the Universi-
ty's vice president of develop-
ment, provided an update to
the regents just two months
before the next capital cam-
paign is set to launch. May
said in the fiscal year preced-
ing the official launch, the
University received gifts from
129,000 donors - a University
record. A record number of
those gifts came in amounts
less than $25,000.

Al
op
co
B
Whi
munit'
renova
ground
celebra
floor r
Michig
and un
The

u ionF ain to occupied by Amer's and The
University Club, are soon to
en early 2014, open with Starbucks and Au
o to Bon Pain as the new tenants.
nstrTuction Susan Pile, director of the
Michigan Union, said she's
hopeful Starbucks will open in
November and Au Bon Pain in
y K.C. WASSMAN January.
Daily News Editor Both spaces are undergo-
ing renovations before the new
le the University com- tenants open their doors to the
y embraced the newly public, and Pile cited the size
ted Michigan Under- and number of renovation of
d food court during a the respective spaces as the
ation Thursday, the first reason the restaurants won't
estaurant spaces of the open at the same time.
gan Union remain vacant The new tenants are in the
finished. approval phase with the Uni-
two spaces, formerly versity's architecture and con-

struction office, but should
start construction soon.
According to documents
acquired by The Michigan
Daily via the Freedom of Infor-
mation Act, both tenants' leases
expire April 30, 2023.
Au Bon Pain will pay
$225,000 per year for their use
of the space until April 30, 2018,
when their lease price increas-
es to $275,000 per year.
Starbucks will pay $34,000
per year for their use of the
space next to the Union court-
yard to be paid in monthly
installments of $2,872.58.
Both vendors will also pay
the University a percentage of
sales.

Al-Qaida militants seize town
in northern Syria near Turkey

"I want to emphasize how impor-
tantitis toget thesmallgiftsand this
was the best year ever,"May said
7. The Board of Regents
4 approved an $11.4-million
renovation of the Ford Nucle-
ar Reactor Building on North
6 $ 2Campus. Decommissioned in
2004, the project will repur-
pose the former nuclear site
into classrooms and laborato-
ries for the Nuclear Engineer-
ing and Radiological Sciences
Department.
S8. After asking the regents
to consider the concerns of
his constituents regarding
the new Munger Residence
Hall, CSG President Michael
Proppe discussed the new
8 7student committee formed
to advise the Presidential
Search Committee.
1 2"The student body is taking the
r search very seriously. I urge you
to take our input just as serious-
ly,"Proppe said.

Militants expell after the Obama administration
shelved those plans in favor of a
Western-backed diplomatic solution.
ibli opMany rebels blame jihadis in
their ranks for the West's reluc-
tance to intervene militarily in
BEIRUT (AP) - Al-Qaida Syria or give them the advanced
militants seized a town near the weapons they need. There is
Turkish border Thursday after also growing concern that the
expelling Western-backed reb- dominant role the extremists are
els from the area, demonstrating playing is discrediting the rebel-
the growing power of jihadis as lion.
they seek to expand their influ- Yet the jihadis, including
ence across opposition-held Syr- members of the Islamic State of
ian territory. Iraq and the Levant, an al-Qai-
The infighting - now engulf- da offshoot, have been some of
ingmany parts of northern Syria the most effective forces on the
- threatened to further split battlefield, fighting alongside
opposition forces outgunned by the Western-backed Free Syrian
President Bashar Assad's troops Army to capture military facili-
and strengthen his hand as he ties, strategic installations and
engages with world powers key neighborhoods in cities such
on relinquishing his chemical as Aleppo and Homs.
weapons. But the two sides have turned
Opposition forces who had their guns on each other. Turf
been hoping that U.S.-led mili- wars and retaliatory killings
tary strikes would help tip the have evolved into ferocious
balance in the civil war are battles in what has effectively
growing increasingly desperate become a war within a war in

northern and eastern Syria, leav-
ing hundreds dead on both sides.
"The moderates realized that
they're losing a lot of territory to
the Islamists and jihadi fighters,
and so they're more desperate,"
said Aaron Zelin, a fellow at the
Washington Institute for Near
East Policy.
The battles for control of
Azaz, a town only few kilometers
from the Turkish border, repre-
sents some of the worst infight-
ing in recent months.
Members of ISIL overran the
town Wednesday evening, kill-
ing several fighters from the
Free Syrian Army rebel umbrel-
la group, before forcing them to
pull out.
Amateur video showed doz-
ens of gunmen with heavy
machine guns on pickup trucks
gathering at the border with
Turkey with reinforcements.
The Associated Press was able
to verify the footage based on
interviews and other reporting
on the events depicted.

1

4 #

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan