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September 13, 2013 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2013-09-13

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2A - Friday, September 13, 2013

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

N ew s The Michigan Daily - michigandailycom

MONDAY:
This Week in History

TUESDAY:
Professor Profiles

WEDNESDAY:
In Other Ivory Towers

420 Maynard St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1327
www.michigandaily.com
ANDREWWEINER KIRBYVOIGTMAN
Editor in Chief Business Manager
734-418-415 ext. 1252 734-418-4115 ext 1241
anweiner@michigandaily.com kvoigtman@michigandaily.com

LEFT Stephanie Ariganello
and Jeremiah Kouhia sell bread
from The Mother Loaf Breads
at Cobblestone Farm Market.
(VIRGINIA LOZANO/Daily)
TOP RIGHT Russ Kurby takes
a short break from woring the
construction that takes places
on South Forest on Monday.
(NICHOLAS WILLIAMS/Daily)
BOTTOM RIGHT Kinesiology
freshman Nick Miramonti races
on an inflatable obstacle course
at the Go North! Fest at North
Campus on Thursday.
(TRACY KO/Daily)

4
4

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CRIME NOTES

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES

Bike takes
a hike
WHERE: Mason Hall
WHEN: Wednesday at
about 6:10 p.m.
WHAT: A bicycle was
reported stolen while
parked between 1:30 p.m.
and 5:45 p.m, University
Police reported. There are
currently no suspects.
Laptop larceny
WHERE: Art and Architec-
ture Building
WHEN: Wednesday at
about 11 p.m.
WHAT: A laptop and cell
phone were reported stolen
from a studio on the third
floor around 11 p.m., Uni-
versity Police reported. The
subject was located in the
UgLi with the stolen laptop
and arrested.

Cash today, 3D lab
gone tomorrow open house

WHERE: Michigan Trans-
plant
WHEN: Wednesdayat
about 7:45 p.m.
WHAT: Cash was reported
stolen from the subject's
coat pocket between 3:45
p.m. and 7 p.m., University
Police reported. The cash
Don't toy
with me
WHERE: 325 Eisenhower
WHEN: Wednesday at
about 12:30 p.m.
WHAT: Two toys were
stolen from a lobby between
Aug. 30 at around 5 p.m. and'
Sept. 3 at around 6 a.m.,
University Police reported.
There are currently are no
suspects

WHAT: Demonstrations
of 3D scanning, rapid pro-
totyping virtual reality,
motion capture and more.
WHO: University Library
WHEN: Today at 12 p.m.
WHERE: Duderstadt
Center
Tango class
WHAT: MTango will
offer a beginning course
in Argentine tango. No
partner or prior exprience
is required. The entire
series of classes costs $25.
MTango also regularly
hosts social dances and
performances.
WHO:MTango
WHEN: Today at 8 p.m.
WHERE: Mason Hall, 3rd
Floor

Jazz trio
WHAT: Appreiciators of
music are invited to a con-
cert free of charge. The trio
will consist of a saxophone,
a bass and a drum.
WHO: The School of Music,
Theatre & Dance.
WHEN: S p.m.
WHERE: Stearns Building
Luminary
sorkshop
WHAT: Make a luminary
sculpture and then bring
the creation to be show-
cased in FoolMoon in Grand
Rapids, Mich.
WHO: Lloyd Hall
Scholars Program
WHEN: Today at 6 p.m.
WHERE: Alice Lloyd
Residence Hall

T HR EE THINGS YOU
SHOULD KNOW TODAY
This year is expected to
be a record breaking year
for cases for measles, CBS
reported. One cause for this
rise is that some fear vaccina-
tions due to religion or misin-
formation or lack of ugrency.
159 cases were reported in 16
states.
Michigan's Michigan
Prisoner Reentry Ini-
tiative has been help-
ing former inmates return
to ordinary citizen life. Now
Gov. Snyder wants to cut
MPRI's funding by half.
FOR MORE, SEE OPINION, PAGE 4
At least three people
were found dead in
Colorado, CBS News
reported. Heavy rain flooded
the area, cutting off towns
and closing down universi-
ties. Citizens were evacuated
from thier homes due to the
floods.

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MatthewSlovin Managing Editor mjslovin@michigandaily.com
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Khare, Danie Wasserman, Liz Vukelich
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The Michigan Daily (IS SN0745-967is published Monday through Friday during the fall and
eitrter s n SytudenetsattheUniesityofMihigan . onecop availabIf eeofchge
fall term,startininSeptemberia .S.ailae$110.Winterterm anuarythroughApril)is
TheihgnarloiSetember hougheApril)ist$s5.Uniete aftescaedubcttoat resus.
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The MichganeDailyis aeeroftTssoiated Pessnd The ssoiatd olleiate Pes.

a

MORE ONLINE Love Crime Notes?
Get more online at michigandaily.com/blogs/The Wire

U.N. chemical weapons report
could expose those guilty in Syria

0

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spectors gather killed 1,400 people, the diplomats
said, speaking on condition of ano-
lence of chemical nymity because discussions on the
issue have been private.
weapon use Under the mandate for the U.N.
team led by Swedish chemical
ITED NATIONS (AP) - weapons expert Ake Sellstrom,
nats said Thursday the the inspectors are to determine
by U.N. chemical weapons whether or not chemical agents
:trs expected next week were used and if so which agent.
point to the perpetrators There is near certain belief in
alleged chemical weapons U.N. diplomatic circles that the
even though they are only deaths were caused by a chemical
d with determining wheth- weapon, and the nerve agent sarin
ly agents were used in Syria isthe main suspect.
who was responsible. The diplomats believe Sell-
o diplomats said the inspec- strom's team can figure out what
llected many samples from happened from what one called
adly suspected poison gas "the wealth of evidence" they col-
on Aug. 21, including soil, lected.
and urine, and interviewed A determination of the delivery
s and witnesses. system used in the attack, and the
y may also have collected composition of the chemical agent,
nts of the rockets or other could pointto the perpetrator, they
ns used in the attack which said.
bama administration says The U.S. and its allies are cer-

tain the Syrian government is
behind the attack though Presi-
dent Bashar Assad's government
and its closest ally, Russia, have
blamed the rebels.
U.N. associate spokesman Far-
han Haq has said the inspectors
would establish a "fact-based nar-
rative" of the Aug. 21 incident.
The foreign ministers of France
and Luxembourg have said that
the report of the inspectors is
expected on Monday.
But Haq could not confirm that
onThursday, adding "the secre-
tary-general has not received the
report so far."
Haq said the U.N. has made
some efforts to speed up 'the
analysis, noting that instead of
two laboratories, the samples are
being tested at four laboratories
in Europe. The testing could have
taken three to four weeks, but the
secretary-general has been press-
ing for a speedier report.

0

This artist rendering released by NASA shows NASA's Voyager1 spacecraft barreling through space. The space agency
announced Thursday, September 2013 that Voyager1 has become the first spacecraft to enter interstellar space, or the
space between stars, more than three decades after launching from Earth.
NASA's Voyager 1 first to
leave solar system

0

_ _ _ --r _ _ _ _ _ -- _ a _ _. -'r r

Monda s
areijn

M&M'SChocolate Candies can make any moment
more fun and delicious.. even Monday moming.
On Monday. September 16 M&M'SBrand is
enabling you to catch a few extra ZZts by providing
FREE rides to class in pedicabs
Who knows, you might even get a rde from a
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P'd cabrs weambste stneuooda cotet pt y and S t S ' M d a i t kf t1 am
'r dt+,womti1, ;u4 uratti2Ui0%

Spacecraft makes
history after traveling
11.5-billion miles
LOS ANGELES (AP) -
NASA's Voyager 1 probe has left
the solar system, boldly going
where no machine has gone
before.
Thirty-six years after it
rocketed away from Earth, the
plutonium-powered spacecraft
has escaped the sun's influence
and is now cruising 11 1/2 bil-
lion miles away in interstellar
space, or the vast, cold empti-
ness between the stars, NASA
said Thursday.
And just in case it encoun-
ters intelligent life out there,
it is carrying a gold-plated,
1970s-era phonograph record
with multicultural greet-
ings from Earth, photos and
songs, including Chuck Berry's
"Johnny B. Goode," along with
Beethoven, Bach, Mozart and
Louis Armstrong.
Neverbefore hasaman-made
object left the solar system as it
is commonly understood.
"We made it," said an ecstat-
ic Ed Stone, the mission's chief
scientist, who waited decades

for this moment.
NASA celebrated by playing
the "Star Trek" theme at a news
conference in Washington.
Voyager 1 actually made its
exit more than a year ago, sci-
entists said. But since there's
no "Welcome to Interstellar
Space" sign out there, NASA
waited for more evidence before
concluding that the probe had
in fact broken out of the hot
plasma bubble surrounding the
planets.
Voyager 1, which is about the
size of a small car, is drifting in
a part of the universe littered
with the remnants of ancient
star explosions.
It will study exotic particles
and other phenomena and will
radio the data back to Earth,
where the Voyager team awaits
the starship's discoveries. It
takes about 17 hours for its sig-
nal to reach Earth.
While Voyager 1 may have
left the solar system as most
people understand it, it still has
hundreds, perhaps thousands,
of years to go before bidding
adieu to the last icy bodies that
make up our neighborhood.
At the rate it is going, it would
take 40,000 years to reach the
nearest star, Alpha Centauri.

Voyager i's odyssey began in
1977whenthe spacecraft andits
twin, Voyager 2, were launched
on a tour of the gas giant plan-
ets of the solar system.
After beaming back daz-
zling postcard views of Jupi-
ter's giant red spot and Saturn's
shimmering rings, Voyager 2
hopscotched to Uranus and
Neptune. Meanwhile, Voyager
1 used Saturn as a gravitational
slingshot to power itself past
Pluto.
Last year, scientists monitor-
ing Voyager 1 noticed strange
happenings that suggested the
spacecraft had broken through:
Charged particles streaming
from the sun suddenly van-
ished. Also, there was a spike in
galactic cosmic rays bursting in
from the outside.
Since there was no detect-
able change in the direction
of the magnetic field lines, the
team assumed the far-flung
craft was still in the helio-
sphere, or the vast bubble of
charged particles around the

0I

sun.
The Voyager team patiently
waited for a change in magnetic
field direction - thought to be
the telltale sign of a cosmic bor-
der crossing.

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