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January 22, 2013 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2013-01-22

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Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tuesday, January 22, 2013

michigandaily.com

Again, Obama takes oath

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600,000 flock
to National Mto erO a ll
toher 1bama

Equality focus of address

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University students
praise speech's
liberal promises
ByALICIA ADAMCZYK
Daily News Editor
WASHINGTON - Although
young voters' support for Presi-
dent Barack Obama's re-elec-
tion, was predicted to waver
in November's election, thou-

sands of college-aged students
descended on the Capitol Mon-
day to celebrate the inauguration
ceremony.
Hundreds of thousands of
people - predominantly minor-
ity groups and females - braved
the cold on the National Mall and
along the parade route to see and
celebrate the president taking the
oath of office. Considerably fewer
people attended Monday's events
than Obama's first inauguration,
See OBAMA, Page 3A

B
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King J

)n MLK Day, siderably smaller than the esti-
mated 1.8 million who attended
)sident speaks his first inauguration four years
ago. The ceremony, which was
m youth and themed, "Faith in America's
yrights Future," occurred 150 years
gay after the signing of the Eman-
cipation Proclamation and 50
3y KATIE BURKE years after King's March on
Daily News Editor Washington. And as if to further
cement the importance of such a
HINGTON - On a cold day, Obama was sworn in on the
y afternoon, an esti- King family bible, in addition to
600,000-person crowd President Lincoln's.
ed on the National Mall The president's address,
r the inaugural address which lasted about 20 minutes,
ident Barack Obama one focused on working towards
me. equality and a safety net for all
ma's second inauguration facets of U.S. citizens, drawing
lace on Martin Luther from sources such as the Decla-
r. Day with a crowd con- ration of Independence and the

Stonewall riots of 1969.
Members of the audience on
the Mall were decked in Obama
paraphernalia and red, white
and blue, demonstrating sup-
port for their newly re-elected
president.
Richard Blanco, the young-
est inaugural poet in history,
read his poem, "One Today" fol-
lowing the president's address.
Blanco is also the first gay poet
to participate in inaugural cer-
emonies.
Renowned pop singer
Beyonce closed the ceremony
before the benediction with
the National Anthem, inciting
a resounding ovation from the
audience.
Obama said although his sec-

and administration will turn
to issues of youth in the United
States, they will in no way forget
those who came before.
"We reject the belief that
America must choose between
caring for the generation that
built this country and investing
in the generation that will biild
its future," Obama said.
He said success for the coun-
try will come from the efforts of
each U.S. citizen.
"We know that America
thrives when every person can
find independence and pride in
their work; when the wages of
honest labor liberate families
from the brink of hardship,"
Obama said.
See ADDRESS, Page 3A

CAMPUS SPEAKER ________________________
King advisor discusses
principles of non-violence

Jones talks gun
control after
* Sandy Hook
By DANIELLE WALLICK
For theDaily
On a day that for nearly 30
years has been set aside to com-
memorate the life of Martin
Luther King Jr., the words of
a man who knew him person-
ally echoed throughout the Blau
Auditorium in the Ross School
of Business on Monday.
Clarence B. Jones, an adviser,
lawyer and speechwriter for
King spoke as the William K.
McInally, Memorial Lecturer.
The lecture was established in
1966 in memory of McInally
who served on the University's
Board of Regents from 1960 to
1964.
Past speakers have included
former Secretary of State Made-
leine Albright and Adrian Fenty,

the former mayor of Washing-
ton D.C.. The speech was a part
of the University's 27th annual
Martin Luther King Jr. sympo-
sium.
Entitled "Behind the Dream:
The Making of the Speech,"
Jones spoke about his "dear
friend" whom he worked closely
with on King's famed "I Have
a Dream" speech. Jones served
as one of King's closest political
advisers and confidants.
Jones said Kingnever wanted
to be described as acivil rights
leader. He wanted everyone to
remember that he was first and
foremost "a minister of the gos-
pel," and his title referred to his
Ph.D. in 'systematic theology.
But, Jones did not downplay his
friend's lasting influence on the
nation.
"In 12 years and four months,
from May 1956 to April 4,1968,"
Jones said, "with the exception
of Abraham Lincoln and the
Emancipation Proclamation,

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. may
have done more to achieve polit-
ical and social justice, racial jus-
tice and equality than any other
person or event in the previous
400 years of our nation."
He added that the second
inauguration of the nation's
first African American presi-
dent and the 50th anniversary
of the "I Have a Dream" speech,
provided a unique opportunity
for Americans to examine what
United States stands for.
"We have arrived (at a point)
where our 21st century inter-
pretation of the constitutional
right of the citizen to bear arms
is incompatible with the legacy
of non-violence bequeathed to
us by Martin Luther King Jr.,
America's apostle of non-vio-
lence," Jones said.
Jones said he believes that
the nation's commemoration of
the 50th anniversary of the "I
Have a Dream" speech in the
See ADVISOR, Page SA

PATICK BARRON/Daily
Angela Davis speaks at the 25th annual University of Michigan Martin Luther King, Jr. Symposium..
To packed audience, Davis attacks
U.S. prison-industrial complex

Noted activist talks
race as part of
MLK Day events
By AARON GUGGENHEIM
Daily StaffReporter
Early Monday morning,
Angela Davis visited the Mar-
tin Luther King Jr. Memorial in

Washington. D.C. to reflect on
her long career as an educator,
author and political activist.
Hours later, she arrived at the
University Union to speak about
race and its impact on the prison
industrial complex to a crowd of
more than 600 members of the
University community.
E. Royster Harper, the Univer-
sity's vice president for student

affairs, introduced Davis. Harp-
er noted that Davis's autobiogra-
phy has played an important role
in helping her to understand her
own life.
"She is a leader who has
inspired generations through
the clarity of her thinking and
the content of her character,"
Harper said.
See DAVIS, Page SA

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NE WON MICHI ANDAIYO INDEX
THEINSTITUTION Report Vol.CXXIII, No.61
MICHIGANDAILY.COM/BLOGS 0213 The Michigan Daily
michigandolty.com

N EW S. ...................y.... 2A A R T S . .......... .. 6 A
INAUGURATION......3A SUDOKU..............5A
OPINION .....................4A SPORTS ..............1B

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