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Ann Arbor, Michigan

Wednesday, March 20, 2013

michigandaily.com

STATE LEGISLATURE
GOP aims
to penalize
'U,' Wayne

MCKENZIE BEREZIN/Daily
Jill Abramson, executive editor of the New York Times, speaks to a crowd at Kahn Auditorium in the Biomedical Science Research Building Tuesday.
NYT

Bill fines schools
that negotiate
before right to
work takes effect
By DANIELLE
RAYKHINSHTEYN
Daily Staff Reporter
A subcommittee in the Michi-
gan House of Representatives
proposed a new bill that could cut
funding to the University's three
campuses by about by $41 million
for the 2013-2014 academic year.
Although the bill would
increase funding for higher edu-
cation, it would penalize the
University and Wayne State Uni-
versity for negotiating contracts
prior to right-to-work legislation
passed in December 2012 and
taking effect at the end of March.
Because the University has
already reached tentative con-
tracts with nurses and lecturers,
it would fall into this penalized
category. The Graduate Employ-
ees Organization spent most of
last week negotiating with Uni-

versity officials to sign a contract
extension prior to the right-to-
work law's effective date. Mem-
bers are currently voting on
an agreement proposed by the
University on Monday after the
union left the bargaining table
late last week. The University of
Michigan Professional Nurses
Council also reached a tentative
agreement last week.
Both groups have yet to ratify
these contracts.
However, the University
would still face penalty if the bill
is passed through the legislature
because of the negotiation of the
contracts, according to Universi-
ty spokesman Rick Fitzgerald. In
order to avoid the loss, the Uni-
versity would have to prove that
these new contract negotiations
would save more than 10 percent
than the old contracts.
Fitzgerald said it's too early in
the budgeting process to deter-
mine how these cuts would affect
the University itself In the mean
time, Fitzgerald said the Univer-
sity will continue to negotiate
with unions with expiring con-
tracts. He said discussion with
See PENALIZE, Page 3A

Abramson reflects
on value of high-
quality journalism
By ADAM RUBENFIRE
ManagingNews Editor
Though it seems like aggre-
gate sites, gossip blogs and
social media dominate the
Internet, Jill Abramson still
thinks there's a high demand for
quality journalism.
Abramson, the executive edi-

tor at the New York Times, told a
crowd of about 200 people at the
Biomedical Science Research
Building Tuesday that, despite
popular belief, there are more
signs than not that of excellence
in journalism.
"I believe there is more
quality journalism being pro-
duced today than ever before,"
Abramson said.
The University's Center for
Education of Women invited
Abramson to speak as the 18th
Mullin Welch Lecturer. She is
the Times' first female execu-

tive editor.
The esteemed journalist came
to The New York Times in 1997
after working at several publica-
tions, including Time magazine
and The Wall Street Journal.
She served as the Times' Wash-
ington bureau chief and man-
aging editor before being
appointed to executive editor of
the New York Times.
Speaking on her 59th birth-
day, Abramson said she believes
it is her "highest calling" to
make sure that production of
quality journalism continues to

be a sustainable business prac-
tice in today's crowded, often
informal media market.
"Quality, serious journalism
that is thoroughly reported, ele-
gantly told and that truly honors
the intelligence of its readers is
the business model of the New
York Times," Abramson said.
"I believe that's why the Times
has been successful during this
challenging transition from
print to digital."
She pointed to Times reports
on Wal-Mart Mexico's practices
See NYT, Page 3A

TUITION EQUALITY
CTE submits
tuition report
to Regents

F UN KY FRES

Findings address
in-state rates for
undocumented
residents
By JENNIFER CALFAS
Daily StaffReporter
After more than a year of
holding protests in support of
in-state tuition equality for
undocumented students, the
Coalition for Tuition Equality
has submitted a report to the
University Board of Regents
detailingthe issue.
The report includes a series
of pros and cons on granting
undocumented students in-
state tuition benefits, according
to Public Policy senior Kevin
Mersol-Barg, the founder of
CTE.
University Provost Phil Han-
lon recommended assembling a
task forceto createthe report in
April 2012 in response to CTE's
previous efforts. The task force
includes Donica Varner, Uni-
versity associate general coun-
sel; Lester Monts, senior vice
provost for academic affairs;
International Center Director

John Greisberger; and three
students including Mersol-
Barg, who is currently a Daily
columnist.
Although Mersol-Barg said
he could not reveal the details
of the report until the regents
have reviewed it, he said the
task force met on a regular basis
"with a very comprehensive
approach" to research the issue
and discuss their findings. He
added that he was impressed
with how committed Univer-
sity administrators have been
in working on the issue.
In November, Mersol-Barg
and the task force traveled to
California on an University-
funded trip to discuss the steps
needed to produce a more
accessible environment for
undocumented students with
administrators from the Uni-
versity of California, Berkeley,
and the University of Califor-
nia, Los Angeles.
While California is one of 12
states to enact state provisions
that allow institutions of high-
er education to give benefits to
undocumented individuals, the
state of Michigan permit these
benefits and governs under a
1996 law.
See CTE, Page 3A

LSA juniors Chris Osborn and Haley Sakwa, forUM's presidential and vice presidential candidates in the upcoming
CSG election, speak to LSA sophomore Jacob Nathanson about the Ann Arbor Student Food Co.'s fresh produce stand
in Mason Hall yesterday.
STUDENT GOVERNMENT
Re ent makes historic stop
to address CSG -members

CAMPUS LIFE
Four-day
event looks
to overhaul
education
EDUpreneurship
participants
to brainstorm
solutions
ByASHWINI NATARAJAN
Daily StaffReporter
An overhaul of the current edu-
cation system is in the making:
students are in a generation under-
going an education revolution.
To encourage this shift, the
University's entrepreneurial
student organization MPowered
has created the EDUpreneurship
Bootcamp, a four-day event from
March 21 to 24 in which Univer-
sity students will work in teams
to create plans for education
reform in local school districts
from grades K-12.
The program is partnering
with the University's School of
Education, Ross School of Busi-
ness, Center for Entrepreneur-
ship, Zell Lurie Institute for
Entrepreneurial Studies, Central
Student Government and the
Saline high schools to host the
bootcamp. The Gates Foundation
See EDUCATION, Page 3A

Bernstein may be
first regent to
visit assembly
By GIACOMO BOLOGNA
Daily Staff Reporter
He has been in office for
only a few months, but Uni-
versity Regent Mark Bernstein

might have made history when
he attended the Central Stu-
dent Government assembly
meeting Tuesday night.
"I was checking with folks
in the secretary's office in the
Fleming building - I may be
the first Regent actually to
ever address Central Student
Government," Bernstein said.
Touching upon numerous
issues including tuition costs

and state funding, Bernstein
spoke to the assembly and
gave a presentation before
fielding questions from repre-
sentatives.
Having been elected in
November, Bernstein com-
pared his time as a regent
to "the first semester of an
eight-year degree." With the
election in recent memory, he
See REGENT, Page 3A

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INDEX
Vol. CXXiII, No. 55
©2013 The Michigan Daily
michigondoily.com

NEWS .........................2A SPORTS............ A.8A
OPINION .....................4A CLASSIFIEDS...............6A
ARTS ...................... 5A STATEMENT ................1B

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