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January 14, 2013 - Image 2

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2A - Monday, January 14, 2013

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

2A - Monday, January14, 2013 The Michigan Daily - michigandailycom

MONDAY TUESDAY: WEDNESDAY: THURSDAY:w FRIDAY:
Ths-Weekin Professor Profiles 'In Other Ivory Towers Alumni Profile Photos of the Week.

gdt ichan 0aUM
420 Maynard at.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1327
www.michigandaily.com
ANDREW WEINER RACHEL GREINETZ
Editor in Chief Business Manager
734-410-4115 eat. 1202 734-418-411a ext. 1241
anweiner@michigandaitycom rmgreinc~michigandaitycom

PURPLE PERFORMANCE

Faculty petition 'U' for health benefits

75 years ago this week The Univ(
(January 11, 1938): scrapped plan
University faculty sent a Residence Fali;
petition to the president and a series of small
regents requesting health The housingc
care coverage for University was intended ft
employees and, their families, foreign studs
The University responded by James A. Lewit
sending out a questionnaire to vice president
employees in order to "determine affairs, said Br
their income, dependents and the be built becaus
size of their families." enrollment. Ms
One University professor, Dr. the University
Forsythe, proposed the solution the constructio
of having all those who desired Project and it
University health care contribute South Quad Re
to a common fund that would act Mary Markley
as a form of insurance for those into co-ed housi
who fell seriously ill 25 years a
50 years ago this week (January
(January 9th, 1963) The Univer:
CRIME NOTES
Paint the town Ring, ring

7ersity initially
ss for Bursley
nfavor ofbuilding
ler buildings.
on North Campus
sr the burgeoning
ent population.
sthe University's
Ztfor student
arsley would not
ise of the lack of
swever, he said,
would continue
on of the Oxford
ito conversion of
esidence Mall and
TResidence Mall
,ig.
sgo this week
y 17th, 1988)
sity's Board of

Regents unanimously rejected a
proposal to incorporate a prohibi-
tion against discrimination based
on sexual orientation into the
bylaws.
Regent Thomas Roach voted
against the proposal despite out-
crses from the LGBTQ communi-
ty. Me said he felt it would "force
the University to stop its business
dealings with organizations" that
opposed homosexuality.
However, the regents decided
to endorse former University
President Harold Shapiro's state-
ment that homosexuality, like
race or religious affiliation, had
no connection to academic or job
performance.
- AARON GUGGENHEIM

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Art and Design freshman Mao Frank, LSA aunion
David Brownman, Engineering sophomore John
Beed, and Rackham student Dave Rogawski partici-
pate in No Pants Bus Ride on the tursley-Baits hus.

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES
IFC Bernanke gives
recruitment remarks

WHERE: Fletcher Hall
WHEN: Friday at about
8:40 .m.
WHAT: Grafitti that
had likely been spray-
painted the day before was
discovered outside the
building, University Police
reported.

WHERE: Duderstadt
Building
WHEN: Friday at about
8:20 p.m.
WHAT: A cell phone was
taken from the third floor
between S and 7 p.m.,
University Police reported.
There are no suspects.

Nature calls Cashing in

WHERE: School of Social
Work
WHEN: Saturday at about
1:45 .m.
WHAT: A subject was
discovered urinating
outside the building late
Saturday night, University
Police reported. The subject
was given a citation for
public urination.

WHERE: Mason Hall
WHEN: Friday at about
11:45 n.m.
WHAT: An envelope full of
money was reportedly lost
or taken from the building
sometime after Jan. 9 at
89p.m., University Police
reported. Police currently
have no suspects.

WHAT: IFC Executive
Board members and
members of each tFC
chapter will host a meeting
to answer questions and
provide general information
for students interested in
being a part of the Greek
Community.
WHO: Office of Greek Life
WHEN: Today at 7 p.m.
WHERE: Michigan Union
SJTU research
WHAT: The Shanghai
Jiao Tong University and
the University will host
a symposium promoting
nanotechnology research.
WHO: Office of the Vice
President for Research
WHEN: Today at 8:10 n.m.
WHERE: Rackham
Graduate School, Fourth
Floor

WHAT: Chairman of the
Board of Governors of the
Federal Reserve System
Ben Bernanke will speak
at a Ford School Policy talk
moderated by Dean Susan
Collins.
WHO. School of Public
Policy
WHEN: Today at 4 p.m.
WHERE: Rackham
Graduate School
CORRECTIONS
S An article in the Jan.
10 edition of the Daily
("Uninersity targers IT
hodget for coat saviogs")
mistated the University's
IT budget. It is $300
million, not $3 million.
* Please report any
error in the Daily
to corrections@
michigandaily.com.

1New Hampshire's new
state law punishes drivers
under the influence of and
impaired by over-the-counter
drugs, according to the Eagle
Tribune. Police officers with
probable cause can pull over
and arrest drivers with certian
medications in their system.
2 The Michigan men'
basketball team lost
a chance at the No. 1
ranking in the nation in.
a loss to Ohio State Sunday.
>> FOR MORE, SEE SPORTSMONDAY,
INSIDE
3The Washington Post
reported a low flu
vaccination rate of only
47.6 percent duringthe March
2012 flu season. According
to the Post, Americans don't
seem to find flu shots as
neccessary as measles or
mumps vaccinations.

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rT MichiganoDliy (ISSN 0145-967) is published Monday through Friday ldurgthe fll and
wireins iy studenrsaOlie nivriy ofnoMichigan. One copy is aaliblrrfree ohrge
to alreaders.Adiionalcopieoomay epickelupaite ail'ofieifor$.s itiosfor
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0

90

MORE ONLINE Lone Crime Notes? Shar them with yoour
followers onTwitter @CrimwNotes or find them on their new biog.

Mexican, Japanese
restaurants open on.
East LiberySre
Ye.It's as Intense as you exect.

New businesses
bring life to
previously vacant
storefronts
By STEPANIE DILWORTH
Daily Staff Reporter
East Liberty Street has two
new, tasty additions only one block
apart: Asian restaurant Kuroshio
and Mexican restaurant tsalita.
Kuroshio, an Asian fusion res-
taurant named after the Ruru-
shio Current off the coast of
Taiwan, is owned by University
alum Alan Wang and his par-
ents, Kenneth Wang and Grace
Chen. tt was built in place of the
former Champion Mouse restau-
rant, which closed last year.
Wang said he drew inspi-
ration from other, acclaimed
Asian restaurants when he
designed Kuroshio, and wants
to offer customers a unique
dining experience. Upon enter-
ing the restaurant, customers
are greeted by themes of water
currents such as a wall foun-
tain, textured wave walls and
tranquil background music.
"I was looking at a lot of fine
dining in Asian restaurants in
East Asia, and a lot of it had
a very simple, minimalistic
design," Wang said. "I was
really drawn to that design and
used it as my inspiration."
Wang said Kuroshio is more
of a special-events place.
The majority of Kuroshio's
food has Japanese influences
in addition to a blend of Kore-
an, Thai and American food.
The restaurant specializes in
seafood, sashimi, or raw, sushi-
grade fish; and sushi.
Wang and Kuroshio's chef,
Venice Lee, said they wanted
to serve mostly Japanese food'

because the cuisine is inher-
ently healthy. In addition, Lee
is most familiar with Japanese
food after undergoing training
with a Japanese chef in Hong
Kong when he was 14 years old.
Head server Gil Tabon said
his favorite aspects of working
at Kuroshio so far are his fellow
staff members and the experi-
ence, as well as the unique dishes
the restaurant offers.
"I love the family orientation
at Kuroshio," Tabon said. "They
really take pride in not only their
food, but who they work with."
Tabon said the quality of ser-
vice is an essential aspect of the
functioning of the restaurant.
"Anticipation is key," he said.
"We always try to anticipate the
guests' needs. You shouldn't have
to ask for more water because it
should aireadybe there."
Kuroshio is currently hiring
and will only be open for din-
ner until it is fully staffed.
Similarly, Isalita will tempo-
rarily only be open for dinner.
Adam Baru, owner of Isalita,
said he decided to. open the
Mexican-themed restaurant
and bar right next door to his
Italian restaurant, Mani Oste-
cia, which opened in 2011.
Baru said the choice of loca-
tion has proven convenient.
"The restaurants being so
close together made this an
easy decision," Baru said. "I
could oversee both restaurants
and my chef Brenden (McCall),
can oversee both as well."
Baru said it was important to
him that the neighboring restau-
rants were varied. While Mani
Osteria is designed with earth
tones and a rustic look, Isalita
is made up of wooden elements
and offers bursts of colors. It also
showcases copper aspects and
has personal touches.
"I wanted it very much to be
two different dining experienc-

es," Baru said. "I want (Isalita)
to feel more vibrant, like Mexico;
a go there every year with my
family. It's not just about bright
colors and cactus, the flaws add
realness to the space. It feels.
youthful and vibrant and even a
little bit more edgy."
Isalita's bartender, Jeff Wes-
terman, said the bar highlights
traditional Mexican drinks and
offers house specialties such
as the "coyacon," which comes
from the word "coyote."
"We've created a whole menu
with our interpretations of Mexi-
can drinks," Westerman said.
"Obviously highlighting tequila
and mezcal, we really wanted to
highlight that on the menu,.it's not
something you'll find around here:'
"(Baru) provides us with a
wonderful working environ-
ment," he added. "He is very
supportive of all of his employ-
ees. He makes sure that this
stays a fun, fresh place to work."
Baru said Chef Brenden
McCall's dishes - such as flau-
tas, tuna tostados, hamachi and
forest mushroom tacos - were
inspired by trips to Mexico. The
restaurant will primarily serve
small plates reminiscent of
Mexican tapas and will always
involve salt, lime and heat.
A customer, Jerry Robins,
said he plans to dine at the res-
taurant in the future.
"It. was a very pleasant expe-
dieuce," Robins said. "The pric-
es are hefty but the service is
good and we enjoyed the food."
Another customer, Kelan
Hlavaty said she had a good
experience at Isalita.
"I would definitely say that*
this is gourmet Mexican food,"
said Hlavaty. "I thought they
could have done a little more
work on the drinks, though. I
thought that they were good,
but for the price they could
have been stiffer."

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