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January 09, 2013 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2013-01-09

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Ann Arbor, Michigan

Wednesday, January 9, 2013

michigandaily.com

IN REMEMBRANCE
Renowned
Political
Science
Prof. dies

TECHNOLOGY
CToolIs gets major upgrade

Wolverine Access
next in line for
interface overhaul
and new features
By PETER SHAHIN
Daily News Editor
Over Winter Break, the
University's Information and
Technology Services launched
an update for CTools, bringing
anew user interface and abasic
level of integration with ser-

vices like Google and Box. The
upgrade focuses on improving
ease of use and stability.
"Students would be most
interested in the improved
navigation and the overall user
experience and user inter-
face," said Sean DeMonner,
ITS director of teaching and
learning. "There's been a lot of
emphasis on reliability. As you
might imagine, CTools is a mis-
sion critical application."
The latest upgrade includes
improvements such as collaps-
ible windows, easier access
to each course site and fewer

clicks to get to frequently
accessed material. The upgrade
also includes pass-through
links to University partners,
such as Google and Box-a file
storage site-to help students
access information stored else-
where.
While CTools does not offer
native support for these plat-
forms, DeMonner said fur-
ther integration would be a
focal point for future upgrades
to CTools. He said the next
upgrade, which will prob-
ably focus on stability issues
and minor enhancements, will

occur around March of this
year.
"We don't yet know exactly
what will be in those releases,
but it's likely that we will con-
tinue to pursue our strategy of
integrating external services
and making deeper ties with
external systems we already
have on campus," DeMonner
said.
DeMonner said he envisions
a system in which an instruc-
tor could create an assignment
within CTools that would auto-
matically update on every stu-
See CTOOLS, Page 3A

Political scientist
focused on black
involvement in
American politics
By AARON GUGGENHEIM
and AUSTEN HUFFORD
Daily News Editor and
Daily StaffReporter
Political Science Prof. Hanes
Walton Jr. died Monday, accord-
ing to the American Political
Science Association. He was 72.
Walton was known affec-
tionately among students for
his memorable lectures filled
with anecdotes and jokes about
politicians and current affairs.
He was equally esteemed by his
colleagues in the world of politi-
cal science: He was elected vice
president of the American Polit-
ical Science Association earlier
this year and was a prominent
researcher at the Institute for
Social Research.
The University was not
immediately available for com-

ment, and the cause of
his passing is still unclear.
Walton was scheduled to teach
two classes this semester, and
students were notified that
his first lectures have been
canceled, but it is currently
unknown if the classes will con-
tinue.
After receiving a Ph.D. in
Government from Howard Uni-
versity in 1967, Walton went on
to teach at Savannah State Col-
lege; Atlanta University and the
University of Georgia before
arriving at the University in
1992.
In the course of 40 years,
Walton's extensive worked and
researched extensively on Afri-
can American participation in
the American political system,
including publishing 21 books
and textbooks.
Walton co-authored Ameri-
can Politics and the African-
American Quest for Universal
Freedom - a textbook is in its
sixth edition - with Robert C.
Smith. Walton also served on
numerous editorial boards for
See WALTON, Page 3A

STATE GOVERNMENT
Lansing passes
controversial
laws inlame-
duck session

R
ab
dis
R
Thro
Decem
and Se
duck
rapidly
islation
Lam
after e
cessors
or Sena
State
session
the eme
passed
licans
but the
to 59-ti
Rick
cal sci
said la
result i
Hall
is mai
politica
session
cians d
re-elec
their se
election
The
of the

ight-to-work passed was right-to-work legis-
lation. The bill makes it illegal
ortion and pot for employees and employers
to contractually agree that all
cussed by state employees who benefit from the
labor contract have to pay the
legislators cost of negotiating the contract.
The move garnered national
By DANIELLE headlines as a result of Michi-
AYKHINSHTEYN gan's historically strong union
Daily StaffReporter presence.
State Rep. Jeff Irwin (D-Ann
iughout the month of Arbor) said the business commu-
ber, the Michigan House nity has been pushing this legis-
nate underwent a lame- lation for years because profits
session in which they will increase if businesses are
passed controversial leg- able to pay workers less.
1. "I'm certain there's a lot of
e-duck sessions occur data out there that says right-
lections, but before suc- to-work-for-less states typically
are initiated into House have lower wages, lower employ-
te seats. er provided benefits and higher
Rep. Jeff Irwin said the unemployment," Irwin said. "So,
's legislation, especially I don't think that's the kind of
ergency manager law, was future that we're striving for."
because House Repub- Charles Brown, a professor of
had a 64-to-46 majority, economics, said the legislation
advantage will decrease most likely passed because the
o-51 in 2013. influence of Michigan unions
Hall, professor of politi- in public affairs has been weak-
ence and public policy, ened.
me-duck sessions often "It's really hard to separate
n more than ten new laws. out the effects of right-to-work
said this phenomenon laws as a piece of legislation from
sly due to the decreased the underlying conditions that
il pressure during the make it possible to pass a right-
is. because some politi- to-work law or not pass a right-
on't have to worry about to-work law," Brown said. "And
tion while others have then I think the consequences
at secured until the next are probably being oversold by
n. both sides."
December session, one The legislature also passed a
most controversial bills See LAME-DUCK, Page 3A

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT
Fed. loan
payments
capped for
graduates
Pay As You Earn
changes rules on
repayment plans
By BEN ATLAS
Daily Staff Reporter
. Facing economic uncertain-
ty and the increasing costs of
higher education, recent col-
lege graduates are getting some
relief from the federal govern-
ment.
Last month, the Department
of Education introduced a new
Pay As You Earn student loan
repayment plan, which will cap
monthly payments for Federal
Direct Student Loans at 10 per-
cent of discretionary income.
In addition to reducing month-
ly loan payments, the program
allows graduates to pay off
their loan over a 20-year peri-
od, rather than the standard 10
years.
"We know many recent grad-
uates are worried about repay-
ing theiwr student loans as our
economy continues to recover,
and now it's easier than ever
for student borrowers to lower
monthly payments and stay on
track," U.S. Secretary of Edu-
cation Arne Duncan said in a
statement.
Changes in student loan poli-
cy are sure to affect much of the
undergraduate population at
the University. According to the
University's Office of Financial
Aid, about 85 percent of resident
undergraduates and 55 percent
See LOANS, Page 7A

THEME SEMESTER
Race-focused project aims
to facilitate open. dialogue

Films, courses tice.
Through April, the project
exhibitions will will feature a comprehensive
agenda of public exhibitions,
complement lectures, films, performances,
discussions, symposia and
theme semester courses, all geared towards
analyzing and interpreting
By ASH NATARAJAN race.
Daily Staff Reporter The project was inspired
by the "Race: Are we so dif-
Is race a social construction ferent?" exhibit created by
or based on biological differ- the American Anthropologi-
ences? cal Association in partnership
The University has intro- with the Science Museum
duced the ' Understanding of Minnesota. By providing
Race Project, in order to dis- insight into the science behind
cuss race in detail and raise. race, the history of race and
awareness about racial injus- the lived experience of race,

the exhibit examines the
effects of race as an economic,
political, and cultural con-
cept. A condensed version of
that exhibit will be on display
at the University's Museum of
Natural History from Feb. 9
through May 27.
In order to engage students
in the greater Washtenaw
community, the project has
trained representatives from
the ten Washtenaw County
school districts to guide dis-
cussions about race and the
exhibit with K-12 students.
The project, with support
from the National Center for
See RACE, Page 3A

W EAT HE R H I: 5-1
TOMORROW LU: 46
aM~MMEMIM~i~iIig

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NEW ON MICHIGANDAlLY.COM
Community reacts to death of Prof. Walton, Jr.
MICHIGANDAILY.COM/NEWS

INDEX NEWS.............2A SUDOKU.....................3A
Vol. CXX, No.53 OPINION ...................4A CLASSIFIEDS ...............6A
©2013 TheMichitanDaily SPORTS...........6A THE STATEMENT ......,1B
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