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February 14, 2013 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2013-02-14

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Ann Arbor, Michigan

Thursday, February 14, 2013

michigandaily com

TICKET CONFUSION
Big Ten.
tickets?
Loyalty,
required
Policy shift awards
tourney tickets
based on mobile
app, attendance
By ZACH HELFAND
Daily Sports Editor
The senior who has missed two
home basketball games in four
years didn't receive an offer for a
student ticket to the Big Ten Men's
Basketball Tournament from the
Michigan Athletic Deparment.
Other students waited for an email
notification that never came. One
house of basketball fans hoping to
go to Chicago was led in circles by
the Michigan Ticket Office.
As the Big Ten Tournament
approaches this year, Michigan
students face two novelties: the
fourth-ranked Wolverines are
considered an earlyfavorite, and
many fans don't know how they'll
get in the building for the potential
coronation.
In a policy shift, the Michigan
Athletic Department this season
distributed student tickets to the
tournament based on loyalty to
the program, measured by game
See TICKETS, Page SA

CARTOGRAPHY REVISITED

Law dean
reflects
on time
at post
Caminker leaves
legacy of expansion,
tradition
By SAM GRINGLAS
Daily StaffReporter
After lunch Friday, Law School
Dean Evan Caminker leaned back in
one of the leather armchairs in his
bright Hutchins Hall office.
"What'd I do this morningDefine
this morning," he said.
Even as Caminker concludes his
second, final term as dean he doesn't
have much time to relax. After a
decade at his post, Caminker hasn't
slowed down - his days typically
begin before dawn and end after 2
a.m.
Nodding at the can of Diet Dr.
Pepper resting on a coaster in front
of him, Caminker talked about the
e-mails, reports and appointments
that kept him awake until 4 a.m. the
night before.
"The day is so jam packed with
doing things and meeting with
people, I don't have time during the
day to make decisions or execute,"
Caminker said. "And maybe that
means I'm not the most efficient per-
See DEAN, Page 5A

PAUL SHEtRMA/Daily
Prof. Deidre de la Cruz and librarian Tim Utter discuss the science and history of mapping in East Asia for an Asian 480 class at Hatcher Graduate
Library Wednesday.
CRIME
Taxi driver, arraigned

Assault allegation is
third against cab drivers
since late January
By DANIELLE STOPPELMANN
Daily StaffReporter
A taxi driver for the Blue Cab compa-
ny who is accused of making unwanted
advances on a 23-year-old Ann Arbor
woman during the weekend pleaded not
guilty to two misdemeanor counts of
assault and battery during an arraign-

ment in the 15th District Court Wednes-
day. Ann Arbor Police have acknowledged
that the case is the third allegation of
"assaultive behavior" - including a rape
- that has been made against Ann Arbor
taxi drivers since late January.
The driver, Ypsilanti resident
Mohamed Ahamok, is accused of touch-
ing the passenger's leg while driving,
then parking and kissing her before she
exited the cab.
The woman - who is not a student at
the University - was picked up on the
1200 block of South University Avenue at
3:30 a.m. on Feb.10.

Judge Elizabeth Hines scheduled Aha-
mok for a pre-trial hearing on Feb. 25
and appointed him a lawyer, accordingto
court documents. Ahamok is prohibited
from having any contact with the victim
in the case.
Ahamok was released on a $10,000
personal recognizance bond, AnnArbor.
com reported. This type of bond only
requires a defendant to pay if they don't
appear at their next court hearing.
John Etter, president of Blue Cab Com-
pany, wrote in a statement that Ahamok
has independently contracted with the
See TAXI, Page SA

GOVERNMENT
Irwin drafting legislation
to decriminalize pot

Pr
ex
pot

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oposal aims to Irwin said he would even-
tually like the state to move
:pand A2-style toward legalizing marijuana
- classified as a Schedule I.
laws statewide controlled substance federally
- and regulating the market.
By BEN ATLAS He believes decriminalization
Daily StaffReporter is a logical first step toward
achievingthat goal.
te Rep. Jeff Irwin (D- He added that marijuana
Arbor) is drafting leg- prohibition has failed, much
on that would make like alcohol prohibition did in
uana possession a civil the early 20th century.
ction rather than a mis- He said bringing pot out of
anor. Decriminalization the black market would allevi-
eady onthe books in cities ate problems for government
as Ann Arbor, Ypsilanti, and consumers.
it, Kalamazoo, Grand "When you make some-
Is and Traverse City. The thing illegal and attach very
ims to expand the policy large penalties to it, it drives
wide, and Irwin hopes to all of the trade into the shad-
duce it in the next several ows - into the black market
hs. where criminal gangs and vio-
Ann Arbor, a civil infrac- lent individuals get the lion's
or marijuana possession share of the benefit and run
s in a $25 fine, accord- the show," Irwin said.
the city charter. In cities Despite potential health
e possession is consid- risks, Irwin argues that legal-
a misdemeanor, offenders ization of things like alco-
nuch more serious conse- hol and marijuana is not an
ces. endorsement to use it.
2010 Harvard Univer- To Irwin, taxes and restric-
publication estimated tions on alcohol are an indica-
the state of Michigan tion of the government's desire
is approximately $1 bil- to lessen negative impacts, and
nforcing marijuana laws he believes the same should be
ally. true for marijuana.

LSA senior Nick Zettell,
outreach director for Students
for Sensible Drug Policy, said
he believes statewide decrimi-
nalizationwould be "a positive
step forward."
"I definitely think with the
state of the overcrowding in
the prison systems, it would
do a lot of good to alleviate the
pressures and tensions within
the criminal justice system
and expedite the process for a
lot of people facing charges,"
he said.
Irwin's legislation faces
some opposition from mem-
bers of the legislative and
executive branches.
Joy Yearout, spokeswoman
for state Attorney General Bill
Schuette, wrote in an email
statement that the Attorney
General Schuette opposes
efforts to legalize drugs.
"Creating a marijuana free-
for-all would undermine pub-
lic safety and endanger our
children," Yearout wrote.
Irwin cited that public
opinion in favor of reforming
and improving marijuana laws
has exceeded 50 percent. His
bill could appeal to Republi-
cans who emphasize smaller
government and reducing
See IRWIN, Page SA

ALLISON FARRAND/Daily
Members of the United Students Against Sweatshops chapter at the University of Michigan welcome two former Adidas
employees who worked at the PT Kizone plant in Indopesia Wednesday.
Indonesian workers ask Coleman to
pressure Adidas for severance pay

Students want 'U' to
use major licensing
contract as leverage
By JENNIFER CALFAS
Daily StaffReporter
Led by former garment worker
Aslam Hidayat, the voices of nearly
50 students filled the Union Pond

Room chanted in Indonesian:
"Long live the workers."
With the help of a translator,
Hidayat and his co-worker Heni -
who only disclosed her first name
- shared their personal experi-
ences and financial troubles of liv-
ing without the severances many
allege are owed to-them and other
workers by the Adidas company.
Since the closing of the PT
Kizone factory - a facility that

produced Adidas apparel - in
April 2011, Hidayat and Heni have
struggled to find new jobs and pro-
vide financially for their families.
The factory owner fled the
country after the company's bank-
ruptcy, failing to pay 2;700 workers
at least $3.3 million. Nike and the
Dallas Cowboys - the two other
companies who contract with the
factory - contributed $1.5 million
See ADIDAS, Page SA

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