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February 07, 2013 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2013-02-07

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Ann Arbor, Michigan

Thursday, February 7, 2013

michigandaily.com
New classes,
curriculum
for Comm.
in fall 2013

AUSTEN HUFFORD/Daily
Wafel Shop employee Sneha Reddy cuts bananas to put on top of a Liege 'Wafel' for a customer, one out of two European-inspired options.
Making a case forwa ffles

Administrators
implement new
prerequsites,
smaller class sizes
By ASHWINI NATARAJAN
Daily Stuff Reporter
Students planning to major in
communications will be initiated
into the department's new rede-
signed curriculum, which has a
focus on new modes of thinking
smaller class sizes and a less oner-
ous application process.
In response to changes in the
field, a result of the vast integration
of communication technology into
everyday life, the University's Com-
munication Studies Department has
renovated its curriculum.
The department last updated its
curriculum in 1995. Since then, it
has has tripled in size and the scope
offacultyresearch and teachinghas
broadened to accompany increas-
ingly globalized media.

Department chair Susan Doug-
las said the new curriculum was
designed to be more standardized.
"We felt that the organization of
our curriculum wasn't as coherent
as it should it be," Douglas said.
The redesign is, in part, focused
on giving concentrators a more
global understanding ofthe media.
"We want to expand students
global horizons and not just focus
on America," Douglas said.
Associate Communications Prof.
Amanda Lotz said an overhaul was
necessary because the field of media
has increased in relevancy.
"(The old curriculum)wasbefore
a lot of the media that was central
to our lives had been created," Lotz
said. "The new curriculum updates
our offerings and incorporates
aspects into our regular curriculum
which were often special topics that
were irregularly offered."
Courses with more research-
based curricula involving critical,
analytical and theoretical skills will
be introduced at the 200 and 300
levels -classeslike Communications
See CURRICULUM, Page SA

T
res
on

W'o European ed on East Liberty Street.
The Wafel Shop, located at
Staurants open 113 East Liberty Street, and
What Crepe?, located at 241
E. Liberty St. East Liberty, moved to Ann
Arbor recently to give locals
By MICHELLE an international experience.
GILLINGHAM What Crepe? - which
Daily Staff Reporter offers more than SO options
of its namesake fare - is plan-
European meal is no lon- ning to open Valentine's Day
plane ride away thanks in the space formerly occu-
o new restaurants locat- pied by Squares Restaurant.

Ashley Jenkins, who does
marketing for What Crepe?,
wrote in an e-mail interview
that Owner Paul Jenkins Jr.
decided to open an Ann Arbor
location after previously liv-
ing in the city. Jenkins said
Jenkins thinks the restaurant
will be a good addition to the
downtown.
"The University commu-
nity is a huge plus along with
all the other schools in the

area," Jenkins said. "We'll
host the whole gamut of pri-
vate events, everything from
graduation parties and field
trips to surprise proposals
and business meetings."
The owners hope What
Crepe?'s menu will soon
expand to options like vegan
and gluten-free crepes. .
"Our expertly paired and
sometimes garden-grown
See WAFFLES, Page SA

AE
ger a
to tw

STUDENT GOVERNMENT
youMich nominates
CSG treasurer for pres.

HANGING OUT

Osborn still junior Chris Osborn, the cur-
rent Central Student Govern-
considering ment treasurer. Osborn has yet
to accept the nomination.
whether to accept In last year's election - the
most contested in years - you-
By GIACQMO BOLOGNA MICH took 23 seats in the
Daily Staff Reporter CSG assembly and nearly won
the presidential election. But
On Monday, the student youMICH's presidential can-
government political party didate, Business senior Shreya
youMICH extended its presi- Singh, lost to Business senior
der tial nomination to LSA Manish Parikh by fewer than

150 votes.
Before serving as treasurer,
Osborn was a representative
on the CSG assembly, where
he served as the chair of the
finance committee. He said he
is still mulling over the offer.
"I'm still considering it.
There's a lot of things to con-
sider. I haven't had enough
time to think either way,"
Osborn said.
See NOMINATION, Page 5A

EAST LIBERTY
Tech company to move into
2nd floor of former Borders

N(MoULnA y WILIAi/uwaay
Art and Design junior Ariel Weiser sets up her CFC 3 project in the Art and Architecture Building Wednesday. She
described her piece as metaphor for her creative project.
Michigan Theater, downtown
businesses share in success

PRIME Research
signs lease first
for building
ByAMRUTHA SIVAKUMAR
Daily StaffReporter
Ann Arbor residents can
expect the face of East Lib-
erty Street to change over the
course of this year as new ten-
ants move into the former Bor-
ders building and surrounding

properties.
The original location of
the bookseller was marketed
for lease in July and PRIME
Research was the first tenant
to show interest in the prop-
erty. Timo Thomann-Rompf,
director of PRIME's Ann
Arbor office, said their leasing
of the Borders building was
confirmed quickly because of
current space constraints.
"We were already a bit
squeezed in our office where
there is really not much room.

for 80 people," Thomann-
Rompf said. "We decided we
needed a bigger space."
PRIME will be leaving
their current 5,000-square-
feet office at 213 South Ashley
Street to the second floor of
the former Borders, occupying
about a third of the property.
Thomann-Rompf said the
new space will allow for fur-
ther additions to the firm.
"We are planning on grow-
ing as a company," Thomann-
See COMPANY, Page SA

After film festival,
businesses see
mutual benefit
By HILLARY CRAWFORD
For the Daily
After last Thursday's screen-
ing of the Sundance Film Festi-
val's psychological drama, The
East, the excitement of festi-

val-goers spilled out from the
Michigan Theater and into the
surrounding area, helping near-
by businesses.
Though hosting Sundance-
an annual film festival based in
Sundance Col.- brings more
customers to the theater and
downtown Ann Arbor, the rela-
tionship between the Michigan
Theater and local businesses
extends beyond the festival.
Rich Bellas, president of the

State Street Area Association
and owner of Van Boven Shoes,
described the relationship
between the theater and down-
town community as a symbiotic
one.
"When you give back, the the-
ater gives back also," Bellas said.
Roger Hewitt, owner of the
Red Hawk Bar and Grill, said
the arts, culture and business
communities of Ann Arbor work
See THEATER, Page SA

WEATHER HI: 30 GOTA NEWS TIP? NEW ON MICNIGANDAL YC
Call 734-41-4115or e-mail I Will' campaign creates video
TOMOR ROW LO:17 news@michigandaily.com and let us know. MICHIGANDAILY.COM/BLOGS/THEWIRE

INDEX
Vol. CXXIII, No.64
©2013 The Michigan Daily
michigondailycom

N E WS.,.......................2A SU DOK U.................. ...3A
OPINION .....................4A CLASSIFIEDS...............6A
SPORTS .................. 7A B-SIDE .................... 1B

. ,. S - . ... x ..... . ,. .. ,.. .. .... -3 .., 3. .. _

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