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February 05, 2013 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2013-02-05

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Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tuesday, February 5, 2013

michigandaily.com

FACULTY ASSEMBLY
New top
attorney.
talks to
SACUA
Recently appointed
General Counsel
answers faculty
questions
By PETER SHAHIN
Daily News Editor
At Monday's meeting of
the University's Senate Advi-
sory Committee on University
Affairs, members heard from
the University's new general
counsel, Timothy Lynch. SACUA
members questioned him on a
variety of legal issues that fac-
ulty commonly face as well as
more complex compliance and
reporting issues, including the
child abuse scandal that rocked
Pennsylvania State University.
Lynch assumed his role as
the University's chief lawyer
on Jan. 7 following the resigna-
tion of Suellyn Scarnecchia in
May. During his legal career,
Lynch worked as an associate
with Washington-based Shea &
Gardner, an assistant U.S. attor-
ney, an assistant chief litigation
counsel with the U.S. Securities
and Exchanges Commission and,
most recently, as the deputy gen-
eral counsel for U.S. Department
of Energy.
No stranger to academia, he
has also taught at the University
of Virginia School of Law and
See SACUA, Page 3

ADMINISTRATION
Group
allowed
back on
campus
Asian InterVaristy
constitution stays
unchanged despite
'U' concerns
By SAM GRINGLAS
Daily StaffReporter
The Asian InterVarsity Vel-
lowship gained University rec-
ognition as an official campus
organization Monday afternoon,
a decision that came on the heels
of allegations last week that the
club was kicked off campus over
University non-discrimination
policy violations.
University spokeswoman
Kelly Cunningham said the club
failed to meet the Sept. 30 annu-
al re-registration deadline but
completed the process Monday
without having to change their
constitution, which outlines reli-
gious criteria for selecting the
group's leaders. Such criteria are
in violation of the University's
policy.
Cunningham said the Univer-
sity discussed the missed dead-
line with Asian InterVarsity in
December. After a re-registra-
tion meeting scheduled for last
week was postponed because of
scheduling conflicts, stakehold-
ers convened Monday to discuss
See GROUP, Page 3

sAiAsAnsAJsA s/Dally
Athletes perform at their annual student variety show known as Mock Rock to help fund Mott Children's Hospital and the Jalen Rose Leadership Academy.
Athletes rock out Hill

Jalen Rose emcees
annual charity
talent show
By DANIEL WASSERMAN
Daily Sports Editor
Monday night's Mock Rock nearly start-
ed without its emcee, Jalen Rose..
Rose, who was scheduled to arrive at
6 p.m., didn't enter the building until 7:10
- 10 minutes after the show's scheduled
starting time. But once he got on stage, he
was full of the flair and charisma that made
him a famous member of the Fab Five.
In his first minute on stage, Rose
acknowledged the hottest team on campus,

the basketball team, which wasn't in atten-
dance because of its game with Ohio State
on Tuesday.
"Don't be surprised if this team does all
of the things we weren't able to do," Rose
said. "And let me just name a couple of
them: win the Big Ten ... and wina Nation-
al Championship. How awesome would
that be?
"I want the problem of making sure
that I'm joined by Juwan Howard, Ray
Jackson, Jimmy Rind and Chris Webber
courtside watching them cut down the
nets this year."
But Rose then mellowed the tone to
hono: the life of former Michigan wres-
tler Jeff Reese, who tragically passed away
during midseason training in 1997. Mock
Rock originated in 1999 to raise funds for

the Jeff Reese Endowed Scholarship. After
the scholarship fund became substantially
subsidized, C.S. Mott Children's Hospital
became the primarybeneficiary. After rais-
ing more than $90,000 last year, the event's
hosts, the Student-Athlete Advisory Com-
mittee, hoped that this year's event would
raise over $100,000.
"I just want to acknowledge that there's
a reason why the wrestling team goes first,"
Rose said, before instructing halfthe crowd
to say"Jeff," the otherto say, "Reese," while
he finished with "Rest in peace."
But when the wrestling team appeared
on stage moments later in tight neon outfits
with "Chariots of Fire" playing, the spirited
atmosphere was set for the evening.
Rose displayed impressive humor
See ROCK, Page 3

(ITY GOVERNMENT
Council discusses S. State Street
corridor, taxi licensing problems

C.S. Mott Children's Hospital Mascot Motty requires a little help unveiling the banner announcing the hospital's top
ten ranking by Parents magazine.
Magazine lists Mott in top
10 U.S. ch ldren's hospitals

Gentrification,
energy efficiency
planned for
commercial area
By MATTHEW JACKONEN
Daily StaffReporter
On Monday night, the Ann
Arbor City Council approved the
distribution of the draft master
plan for the South State Street Cor-
ridor Plan. Council members also
discussed the Feb. 4 rape report
and the allocation of energy funds.
The corridor plan,. which has
been discussed since Oct. 2011,
plots the future of what is known
as the State Street corridor - the
stretch of State Street between
Stimson Street and West Riling-
ton Street. This stretch of land
contains vital University prop-
erty, including South Campus,
the University golf course and
Briarwood Mall.
The plan aims to promote
development, improve the
appearance of the corridor, sus-
tainability and economic vigor
along the corridor. It holds any
proposed development to high
environmental and public safety
standards. It also includes a rec-
ommendation to demolish cer-
tain small commercial buildings
in order to create more efficient,
high-rise livingspace.
The draft will come back to
the council for further discussion
at a later date and could include
the addition of amendments to
the plan.

KUNSELMAN DISCUSSES
TAXICAB REGULATIONS
FOLLOWING
SEXUAL ASSVAULT
Councilmember Stephen Kun-
selman, the Democratfrom Ward
3, also spoke out in response to
the reported rape of a female
University student this Sunday
during open commentary.
University Police released a
crime alertregarding the incident
Sunday. Kunselman proposed
that the City Council crack down
on certain' taxi, companies that
operate without licensing within
Ann Arbor.
"It brings forth the issues
we've been grappling with ... the
issues of rogue limos," Kunsel-
man said. "We have been worried
about that for some time, and it is
time for this council, this admin-
istration and the police depart-
ment to take action."
Kunselman said because he
holds a spot on the Ann Arbor
Taxicab Board, he would push for
more accountability and licensing.
"The one thing I can do about
it as the chair is to. start asking
for a monthly report at our taxi-
cab board meetings about what
enforcement activities are taking
place," Runselman said.
Ann Arbor Mayor John Hieftje
said he agreed with Kunselman,
noting that the city should do
more to solve this issue.
COUNCIL DISCUSSES
PACE BONDS
The Council also postponed

the vote on a resolution to autho-
rize the allocation of property-
assessed clean energy bonds.
The resolution, which resolves
the allocation of up to $1 mil-
lion in PACE bonds, was inserted
Monday before the council meet-
ing.
The city created the PACE
program after receiving a
$432,800 Energy Efficiencfand
Conservation Block Grant from
the U.S. Department of Energy.
The program intends to improve
commercial energy use and
help businesses within the city
finance clean energy improve-
ments.
The resolution proposes to
allocate these funds to various
properties across Ann Arbor in
the hopes of increasing the use
of clean energy. Whether or not
the properties mentioned in the
resolution are in most need of
the funds in terms of clean ener-
gy is unclear.
Hieftje said he doesn't think
postponing the vote is an issue
and expressed his satisfaction
at the near culmination of the
process.
"I don't think it matters at
all," Hieftje said. "It is a very
exciting move. There have
been a lot of people that have
been working on this program
for years, and I will be very
joyful when we get this under
way. But we do still have a lit-
tle bit of time given the time
frame that has been set for us
with the backstop fund that
has been set up by the federal
government."

Officials hope
ranking will spur
development
By STEPHANIE SHENOUDA
Daily StaffReporter
To an intimate crowd on
Monday morning, Motty - the
C.S. Mott Children's Hospital
mascot - pulled down the ban-
ner that officially revealed the
hospital has been named the
eighth best children's hospital
in the nation by Parents maga-
zine.

This announcement marks
the first time that the hospital
was ranked in the top 10 by the
magazine, which has circula-
tion around 2.2 million. Chris
Dickinson, interim executive
director of the hospital, told
the crowd that the acknowledg-
ment is a major milestone for
the hospital.
"We are thrilled to make this
announcement and very proud
of this accomplishment and
what it means for the organiza-
tion," Dickinson said. "We are
thrilled to be recognized by a
magazine trusted by so many
parents for advice on raising

healthy children."
Dickinson said in an inter-
view after the event that he
believed the new facility,
whichopened in Dec. 2011, is a
hidden gem of the University.
"I've been here since 1984,
and I love this place, I love what
we do here," Dickinson said.'
"We do a lot of unusual, great
things for kids, and I bet that
a lot of the students don't even
know that there's a children's
hospital here. So I'm hoping
that this recognition and valida-
tion for all the good work that
we do there."
See MOTT, Page 3

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College presidents hold gun safety conference
MICHIGANDAILY.COM/BLOGS

INDEX NEWS.......>,................2 SPORTS ..................... 7
Vol. CXXIIlll, No.62 OPINION ..................... 4 SUDOKU .....................3
©2013TheMichiganDaily ARTS...................... 5 CLASSIFIEDS..............6
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