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December 11, 2012 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2012-12-11

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iC4t0 an 4,3atIV

ONE -I 1U ND ED)

F R EEDQ

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tuesday, December 11, 2012

michigandaily.com

REGENTS PREVIEW
'U' to pay
$1.075M for
Bumpy space

Regents also to
vote on Fishbowl
renovations
By SAM GRINGLAS and
JENNIFER CALFAS
Daily StaffReporters
At its monthly meeting on
Thursday, the University's Board
of Regents will discuss the pur-
chase of properties on South
Division Street, including the
property where Blimpy Burger is
located, several renovation proj-
ects, and temporary procedures
for hiring new faculty.
The regents will not formally
meet in January, having elected

instead to spend time in Cali-
fornia at a series of workshops
and discussions about future
challenges facing higher edu-
cation. The meeting on Thurs-
day will be the last for Regents
Olivia Maynard (D-Goodrich)
and S. Martin Taylor (D-Grosse
Pointe Farms), whose terms
expire on January1, 2013.
Incoming regents Mark Ber-
nstein and Shauna Ryder Diggs,
both Democrats, will go to the
meetings Jan. 17-18in Los Ange-
les. The regents will resume
their regular schedule of meet-
ings on February 21, 2013.
One of the highest profile
items on the agenda will be for
the regents to consider whether
See BLIMPY, Page 3

SENATE ASSEMBLY
At meeting,
SACUA als
Big House Run

TERESA MATHEW (TOP LEFT, BOTTOM) AND JOSEPH LICHTERMAN(TOP RIGHT)/Daily
In his speech at the Detroit Diesel Plant in Redford, Mich. President Barack Obama said Michigan's right-to-work fight has "everything to do with politics"
bama enters into
ri ht-to-work battle

Kearfott: There
were 'risks' in
working with for-
profit charity
By AUSTEN HUFFORD
Daily Staff Reporter
University faculty members
aired their grievances over the
University Athletic Depart-
ment's decision to cancel the
Big Heart Big House run at
Monday's meeting of the Senate
Advisory Committee on Uni-
versify Affairs.

SACUA chair Kimberlee
Kearfott, an engineering pro-
fessor, said at the meeting that
she met with University Ath-
letic Director David Brandon on
Monday morning to discuss the
decision. Kearfott said Bran-
don told her the cancellation of
the race was based on concerns
about the race's sponsor, Chamin
pions for Charity, and did not
reflect broader policy changes.
"The change was not made
for financial reasons because
they did receive fees for use of
the stadium," Kearfott said.
"There were risks associated
with that specific individual
See SACUA, Page 3

In speech at Detroit-
Diesel Plant,
president chastises
Michigan GOP
By ALICIA ADAMCZYK-
Daily StaffReporter
Redford, Mich. - With thou-
sands of protesters expected
to descend on the State Capitol
on Tuesday, President Barack

Obama entered into the fray
surrounding Michigan's conten-
tious battle over right-to-work
legislation during remarks at
the Detroit Diesel Plant here on
Monday.
Obama, speaking before sev-
eral hundred UAW workers as
well as many members of the
Michigan Democratic Congres-
sional delegation, chastised
Republican Gov. Rick Snyder
and other Michigan Republi-
cans for championingthe recent
right-to-work bills. If signed by

Snyder - which is expected to
occur on Tuesday - the legisla-
tion would make union due pay-,
ments voluntary for private and,
most public-sector unions.
"What we shouldn't be doing
is trying to take away your
rights to bargain for better
wages," Obama said to enthusi-
astic applause. "These so called
right-to-work laws have nothing
to do with economics, they have
everything to do with politics."
Obama pointed to Michigan's
automotive unions as repre-

sentative of the importance of
collective bargaining in the for-
mation of the middle class and
the success of the larger United
States, and he said state and
national representatives should
be fighting to preserve the pro-
cess.
"What they're really talking
about is giving you the right to
work for less money," the presi-
dent said. "America's not going
to compete based on low-skill,
low-wage, no worker's rights -
See OBAMA, Page 3

CLASS OF 2013
Daily
elects
2013
e ditors
Online coverage a
focus for paper's new
leaders
By JENNIFER CALFAS
Daily StaffReporter
More than 100 staff members of
The Michigan Daily filled the second
floor of the Stanford Lipsey Student
Publications Building to elect the
paper's new editor in chief on Nov. 9.
After hours of posing questions, the
staff chose candidate Andrew Wein-
er, a Public Policy junior, to serve as
the editor-in-chief for the 2013 calen-
dar year.
The staff-wide elections are held
every fall semester to determine the
- editor in chief and editorial page
editor for the following year. The
remaining sections - news, arts,
See EDITORS, Page 3

FINISHING ON A HIGH NOTE

STUDENT GOVERNMENT
Even after votes,
students divided
over RSG secession

Both sides argue
over financial
impact of move
By GIACOMO BOLOGNA
Daily Staff Reporter
As results from the ref-
erenda on graduate student
secession from the Central
Student Government roll in,
supporters and detractors of
the issue continue to argue
their respective cases.
Last month, 9.5 percent of
Rackham students voted in
the Rackham Student Gov-
ernment elections with 69
percent of voters supporting
secession. The Law School
Student Senate held its elec-
tions last week with mixed
results for secession. LSSS
election director Joe Gallagh-
er said though turnout in the
school of only 1,165 students
was 48 percent, the margin
of students supporting seces-

sion was narrower fitn the
RSG election, with64 percent,
or 354 voters, in favorand 36
percent, or 203voters, against.
Standing on opposing sides
of the secession argument,
Rackham student Michael
Benson, RSG president, and
Public Policy graduate student
Zeid El-Kilani, the chair of the
CSG Graduate Student Affairs
Commission disagree on the
central reasoning for seces-
sion.
"It's an issue that's com-
pletely about money," El-
Kilani said. "And if anyone
says 'well no it's about repre-
senting these interests more,'
no it has to do with Rackham
- they do great things, they
want to have more money to
do greatthings."
Benson said he wholeheart-
edly rejects that claim.
"What we're looking to
do is not a financial thing at
all - there's a financial com-
ponent," Benson said. "We're
See SECESSION, Page 3

MCKszNIEneyEZIN/Daily
Law student Marta Rajkova plays the piano in the Michigan Union while students study tor exams on Monday.

WEATHER HI 39
TOMORROW LO: 29

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INDEX.
Vol. CXXIII, No. 60
©201 The Michigan Daily
michigandoily.com

N EWS ........ ................ 2 S P OR TS .................. .5
AP NEWS ................... 3 CLASSIFIEDS...... A........6
OPINION .....................4 ARTS .......................... 6

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