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November 29, 2012 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2012-11-29

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2A - Thursday, November 29, 2012

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

420 Maynard St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1327
www.michigandaily.com
JOSEPH LICHTERMAN RACHEL GREINETZ
dite r in Chief Business Manager
734-410-4115 ext. 1252 734-418-4115 ext. 1241
licteerman@michigandaitycomermgrein@mnichigandaily.coms

Learning Ann Arbor exists

Where are you from orig
inally?
I'm 100-percent Chinese
but I grew up in Sydney, Aus
tralia. It's nice; it's warm i
comparison to here, but it
very far away. I like Austra
lia a lot, it's a very nice pIa
to live. I've lived in the state
for 10 years now. I studied i
Boston before coming here
I've lived in Ann Arbor fo
four years now, and this is m
fourth year with the Univer
sity.
Why did you choose t
come to the University o
Michigan?
It has a very good mat
CRIME NOTES
Lewd lift
WHERE: Modern
Languages Building
WHEN: Wednesday at
about midnight
WHAT: An elevator was
discovered to have racist
graffiti, University Police
reported. The specific
graffiti was unable to be
found by police after the
vandalism was reported to
them.

department, in particularly
with what I do, which is com-
e, binatorics. Before I moved
- here, I had no idea Ann Arbor
n actually existed. In fact, I may
's have known Michigan was a
- state, but it would be pretty
e unlikely that I would have
s known where it was on the
n map.
e.
r What exactly is combina-
y torics?
r Combinatorics is the study
of counting, usually discreet
objects. For example, what are
o all the possible poker hands
f you can get, for five cards
out of 52, what are all the
h hands you could possibly get?
Mirror I
marking 1
WHERE: Dennison M
Building b
WHEN: Wednesday at d
about 12:40 a.m. r
WHAT: Bathroom mirror U
and walls were covered a
in ink graffiti, University ti
Police reported. There are V
currently no suspects. S

I do a type called algebraic
combinatorics, so I'm inter-
ested in studying problems .
that involve algebra, which
involves studying equations.
What do you do on your
days off?
Well, today, I'm going rock
climbing ... I (also) play hock-
ey. Well I haven't played all
year so far, but I hope to start
playing again this winter. I
learned both of those things
since I've come to America.
In terms of exercise, I like
running. Running is my main
form of exercise.
Members
-STEPHANIE SHENOUDA open-air;j
CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES

Newsroom
734-418-4115 opt.3
Corrections
corrections@michigandaily.com
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Sports Section
sports@michigandaily.com
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Online Sales
onlineadsgnmichigandaily.com

News Tips
news@michigandaily.com-
Letterstothe Editor
tothedaily@michigandaily.com
Editorial Page
opinion@michigandaily.com
Photography Section
photo@michigandaily.com
Classified Sales
classified@michigandaily.com
Finante
finance@michigandaily.com

of Groove promote their upcoming concert with an
am session on the Diag on Wednesday. ,

DAN

Baits bud
Shattered glass

WHERE: Administrative
Services Building
WHEN: Tuesday at about
7 p.m.
WHAT: A glass window
was shattered by a thrown
object, University Police
reported. There are
currently no suspects.

WHERE: Vera Baits tO
Housing Complex
WHEN: Tuesday at about
12:55 p.m.
WHAT: There was a
potential marijuana
transgression, University
Police reported. The
situation will be handled by
internal staff.

C
S
m
th
N
M
a;
W
W
WT
S

Baseball
ecture
WHAT: Brad Lefton, a
ilingual journalist, will
iscuss the differences of
eporting baseball in the
inited States and Japan as
part of the CJS Noon Lec-
ure Series.
WHO: Center for Japanese
tudies
WHEN: Today at noon
WHERE: School of Social
Nork Building, room1636
Culture
-eminar
WHAT: A discussion of
he ritual mutuality among
orth African Jews and
Muslims. Harvey Goldberg,
Frankel Institute Fellow,
'ill speak on the subject.
VHO: Judaic Studies
WHEN: Today at noon
VHERE: 202S. Thayer
treet, room 2022

pa a Recent studies show the
workshop heart strain of running
in older athletes may
WHAT: A class for those cancel its benefits, The
interested in learning Pho= Wall Street Journal reported.
toshop skills for their daily Older runners who go 20 to
life including useful saving 25 miles a week had the same
and editing techniques. mortality rate as non-run-
WHO: Teaching and ners, one study found.
Technology Collaborative
WHEN: Today at 1p.m.T
WHERE: Harlan Hatcher Thirty-six hours spent
Graduate Library, Faculty exploring downtown's
Exploratory Main Street highlight
known haunts for stu-
M arxism dents in the final weeks of the
term. >FOR MORE, SEE THE B-SIDE
reading group INSIDE

Photnshon

EDITORIAL STAFF
Andrew Weiner ManagingEditor anweiner@michigandailycom
Bethanyeiron ManagingNews Editor bShe@mihigandaiy.om
SENOR N E STEDInORS:aeyGatt ,HaleyGoldberg, Rayzosith,
"ndrew Schulman,AdamRubenfire
ASSISTANT nEWS EDITORS: Alicia Adamczyk, Katie Burke, Anna Rozenberg, Peter
Sbahin,TaylorWizner
Timothy Rabb and opinioneditors@michigandaily.com
Adrienne Roberts Editorial Page Editors
SENIOREDITORIALPAGEEDITORS:Melanie ruvelis,HarshaNahata,VanessaRychlinski
ASSISTANT EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS: Jesse Klein, Sarah Skaluba
Stephen Nesbitt Managing sports Editor nesbitt@michigandaily.com
SENIOR SPORTS EDITORS: Everett Cook, Ben Estes, Zach Helfand, Luke Pasch,
Neal Rothschild, Matt Slovin
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITORS: Steven Braid, Michael Laurila, Matt Spelich,
ColleenThomas,LizVukelich,oDanielWasserman
Leah Burgin ManagingArts Editor burgin@michigandaily.com
SENIOR ARTS EDITORS: Elliot Alpern, Matt Easton, Kayla Upadhyaya
ASSISTANT ARTSEDITORS:JacobAxeirad,LarenCaserta,KellyEtz,Anna
Sadovskaya, Chloe Stachowiak
Erin Kirkland and photoomichigandaily.com
Alder Reiss MsnagingePhotoEcditors
S IROOEDTOSn s rra engraff, Todd Needle
ASSISTANTPHOTOEDITORS:AdamGlanzman,Austen Hufford, AllisonKruske
Marlene Lacasse, Adam Schnitzer
Alicia Kovalcheck.and design@michigandaily.com
Amy Mackens Managing Design Editors
Dylan Cinti and statement@michigandaily.com
JenniterXa MagazinEditers
Hannah Poindexter Copychief copydesk@michigandaily.com
SENIORCOPYEDITORS:JosephineAdams,BethCoplowitz
BUSINESS STAFF
Ashley Karadsheh Associate Business Manager
SeanlJackson Setesnagee
Sophie Greenbaum Production Manager
Connor Byrd Finance Manager
Meryl Hulteng National Account Manager
The Michigan Daily (IsSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and
win tr erms by students at the University of Michigan,O One copy is available free of charge
to al readers. Additional copies may be picked up at the Daily's office for $2.Subscriptions for
fall term, starting in September, via U.S. mail are $110. Winter term (January through April) is
$itt, yearlong (SeptemberthroughtApri) is $19s.University affiliates are subject to a reeduel
subscriptionrate.On-campus subscriptionsforaltermare$35.Subscriptionsmustbeepaid.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and The Associated Collegiate Press.

WHAT: A conversation on
Robert Heilbroner's book
"Marxism: For and Against."
WHO: College Socialists
WHEN: Tonight at 7 p.m.
WHERE: Michigan League,
Room A
CORRECTIONS
" Please report any error
in the Daily to correc-
tions@michigandaily.com.

The Powerball Jackpot
reached a record-
breaking $550 million
Wednesday, The Boston
Globe reported. Tickets in
Massachussets have been
selling at a rate of $14,800 per
minute in a "national ticket
sales frenzy."

Obama: 'I'll do whatever it
takes' to get a deal on taxes

Democrats,
Republicans both
hint at concessions
WASHINGTON (AP) - The
White House and a key congres-
sional Democrat hinted at fresh
concessions on taxes and cuts to
Medicare and other government
benefit programs Wednesday as
bargaining with Republicans
lurched ahead to avoid the year-
end "fiscal cliff" that threatens

to send the economy into a tail-
spin.
Increasing numbers of rank-
and-file Republicans also said
they were ready to give ground,
a boost for House Speaker John
Boehner and other party lead-
ers who say they will agree to
higher tax revenues as part of a
deal if it also curbs benefit pro-
grams as a way to rein in federal
deficits.
"I'll go anywhere and I'll do
whatever it takes to get this
done," President Barack Obama

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WWW.KAIGARDEN.COM
H-U.D

said as he sought to build pres-
sure on Republicans to accept
his terms - a swift renewal of
expiring tax cuts for all but the
highest income earners. "It's
too important for Washington
to screw this up," he declared.
For all the talk, there was no
sign of tangible progress on an
issue that marks a first test for
divided government since elec-
tions that assured Obama a sec-
ond term in the White House
while renewing Republican
control in the House.
"It's time for the president
and Democrats to get serious
about the spending problem
that our country has," Boehner
said at a news conference in
the Capitol. He, like Obama,
expressed optimism that a deal
could be reached.
At the same time, he publicly
disagreed with one GOP law-
maker, Rep. Tom Cole of Okla-
homa; who said he was ready
to go along with Obama's plan
to renew most but not all of the
expiring income tax cuts. "It'll
hurt the economy" to raise rates
for anyone, said Boehner.
Separately, at a closed-door
meeting with the rank and file,
the speaker told fellow Repub-
licans they are on solid politi-
cal ground in refusing to let tax
rates rise. He circulated polling
data showing the public favors
closing loopholes to raise rev-
enue far more than it supports
raising rates on incomes over
$250,000.
There were no face-to-face
talks between the administra-
tion and lawmakers during the
day, although the White House
is dispatching Treasury Sec-
retary Tim Geithner and top
legislative aide Rob Nabors to a
series of sessions with congres-
sional leaders on Thursday.
On Wednesday, a group of
corporate CEOs pushing for a
deal met separately with top
Democratic and Republican
leaders in the House, joined by
Erskine Bowles, who was co-
chairman of a deficit commis-
sion Obama appointed earlier in
his term.

Protesters storm an office of Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood Freedom and Justice party and
set fires in the Mediterranean port city of Alexandria, Egypt, Friday, Nov. 23, 2012.
Egypt crisis raises fears
of 'second revolution'

Draft of new
constitution
expected this week
CAIRO (AP) - Faced with
an unprecedented strike by the
courts and massive opposition
protests, Egypt's Islamist presi-
dent is not backing down in the
showdown over decrees granting
him near-absolute powers.
Activists warn that his actions
threaten a "second revolution,"
but Mohammed Morsi faces a
different situation than his oust-
ed predecessor, Hosni Mubarak:
He was democratically elected
and enjoys the support of the
nation's most powerful political
movement.
Already, Morsi is rushing the
work of an Islamist-dominated
constitutional assembly at the
heart of the power struggle, with
a draft of the charter expected
as early as Thursday, despite a
walkout by liberal and Christian
members that has raised ques-
tions about the panel's legiti-
macy.
The next step would be for
Morsi to call a nationwide ref-

erendum on the document. If
adopted, parliamentary elec-
tions would be held by the
spring.
Wednesday brought a last-
minute scramble to seize the
momentum over Egypt's politi-
cal transition. Morsi's camp
announced that his Muslim
Brotherhood and other Islamists
will stage a massive rally in
Cairo's Tahrir Square, the plaza
where more than 200,000 oppo-
sition supporters gathered a day
earlier.
The Islamists' choice of the
square for Saturday's rally raises
the possibility of clashes. Several
hundred Morsi opponents are
camped out there, and another
group is fighting the police on a
nearby street.
"It is tantamount to a dec-
laration of war," said liberal
politician Mustafa al-Naggar,
speaking on the private Al-Tah-
rir TV station.
Morsi remains adamant that
his decrees, which place him
above oversight of any kind,
including by the courts, are in
the interest of the nation's transi-
tion to democratic rule.
Backing down may not be an

option for the 60-year-old U.S.-
educated engineer.
Doing so would significantly
weaken him and the Brother-
hood at a time when their image
has been battered by widespread
charges that they are too preoc-
cupied with tightening their grip
onpower to effectivelytackle the
country's many pressing prob-
lems.
Morsi's pride is also a key
factor in a country where most
people look to their leader as an
invincible figure.
He may not be ready to stom-
ach another public humilia-
tion after backing down twice
since taking office in June. His
attempt to reinstate parliament's
Islamist-dominated lower cham-
ber after it was disbanded in July
by the Supreme Constitutional
Court was overturned by that
same court. Last month, Morsi
was forced to reinstate the coun-
try's top prosecutor just days
after firing him when the judi-
ciary ruled it was not within his
powers to do so.
Among Morsi's first acts after
seizing near-absolute powers last
week was to fire the prosecutor
again.

'I

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