100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 14, 2012 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2012-11-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

bA - Wednesday, November 14, 2012

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

6A - Wednesday, November 14, 2012 The Michigan Daily - michigandailycom

Prosecutors request
death penalty in
Afghan murder case

t'

Accused killer was
an Army sergeant,
killed 16 villagers
JOINT BASE LEWIS-
McCHORD, Wash. (AP) - Army
prosecutors on Tuesday asked an
investigative officer to recom-
mend a death penalty court-mar-
tial for a staff sergeant accused
of killing 16 Afghan villagers in
a predawn rampage, saying that
Staff Sgt. Robert Bales com-
mitted "heinous and despicable
crimes."
Prosecutors.made their closing
arguments after a week of testi-
mony in the preliminary hearing.
Prosecutors say Bales, 39, slipped
away from his remote base at
Camp Belambay in southern
Afghanistan to attack two villag-
es early on March 11. Among the
dead were nine children.
The slayings drew such angry
protests that the U.S. temporar-
ily halted combat operations in
Afghanistan, and it was three
weeks before American inves-
tigators could reach the crime
scenes.
"Terrible, terrible things hap-
pened," said prosecutor Maj. Rob
Stelle. "That is clear."
Stelle cited statements Bales
made after he was apprehended,
saying that they demonstrated
"a clear memory of what he
had done, and consciousness of
wrong-doing."
Several soldiers testified that
Bales returned to the base alone
just before dawn, covered in
blood, and that he made incrimi-
nating statements such as, "I
thought I was doing the right
thing."
An attorney for Bales argued
there's not enough information
to move forward with the court-
martial..
"There are a number of
questions that have not been
answered so far in this investi-
gation," attorney Emma Scan-
lan told the investigating officer

overseeing the preliminary hear-
ing.
Scanlan said that it's still
unknown what Bales' state of
mind was the evening of the kill-
ings.
An Army criminal investiga-
tions command special agent
had testified last week that Bales
tested positive for steroids three
days after the killings, and other
soldiers testified that Bales had
been drinking the evening of the
massacre.
"We've heard that Sgt. Bales
was lucid, coherent and respon-
sive," Scanlan said in her closing
argument. "We don't know what
it means to be on alcohol, ste-
roids and sleeping aids."
The investigating officer said
Tuesday that he would have a
written recommendation by the
end of the week, but that is just
the start of the process. That
recommendation goes next to
the brigade command, and the
ultimate decision would be made
by the three-star general on the
base. There's no clear sense of
how long that could take before
a decision is reached on whether
to proceed to a court-martial
trial.
If a court-martial takes place,
it will be held at Joint Base Lew-
is-McChord, the Washington
state base south of Seattle, and
witnesses will be flown in from
Afghanistan.
The military hasn't executed
a service member since 1961, and'
none of the six men on death row
at Fort Leavenworth, Kan., today
were convicted for atrocities
against foreign civilians. All of
their crimes involved the killing
of U.S. civilians or fellow service
members.
In the most recent high-
profile case at Joint Base Lew-
is-McChord before Bales, the
Army did not seek a death pen-
alty court-martial against five
soldiers accused of killing three
Afghan civilians for sport. In
that case, the ringleader was sen-
tenced to life in prison with pos-

sibility of parole.
Bales faces 16 counts of pre-
meditated murder and six counts
of attempted murder. The pre-
liminary hearing, which began
Nov. 5, included nighttime ses-
sions on Friday, Saturday and
Sunday for the convenience of
the Afghan witnesses. Bales did
not testify.
The witnesses included a
7-year-old girl, who described
how she hid behind her father
when a gunman came to their vil-
lage that night, how the stranger
fired, and how her father died,
cursing in pain and anger.
None of the Afghan witnesses
were able to identify Bales as
the shooter, but other evidence,
includingtests of the blood on his
clothes, implicated him, accord-
ing to testimony from a DNA
expert.
After the hearing concluded,
Scanlan spoke with report-
ers, saying that in addition to
questions about Bales' state of
mind, there are still questions of
whether there were more people
involved.
During testimony, a special
agent testified that months after
the killings, she was able to inter-
view the wife of one of the vic-
tims, who recounted having seen
two U.S. soldiers. Later, however,
the woman's brother-in-law,
Mullah Baraan, who was not
presentat the shootings, testified
that the woman says there was
only one shooter. The woman

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Appeals Court Judge Catherine McCabe speaks about careers in environmenal law
in Hutchins Hall on Monday.
Careers ln environmental
law focus of EPAjudge's talk

Catherine McCabe
is a pioneer in
environmental law
By JEANNETTE HINKLE
DailyStaffReporters.

to advise students on their
future.
"One of my favorite things
to do now that I am in the later
stages of my career is to talk to
those who are in the early, grow-
ing up stages and seeing what's
on your mind and where you
think you might want to go,"

herself did not testify.
"We need to know
than one person was ou
wire," Scanlan said.
Scanlan also raised
of post-traumatic stre
der and brain injury, n
Bales had received a scr
the traumatic brain inji
at Madigan Army Med
ter during a period of1
the center is under invr
for reversing hundreds
diagnoses of soldiers sit
"We're in the procesr
tigating that," she said.

U.S. Environmental Protec- McCabe said.V
if more tion Agency Appeals Court McCabe didn't only practice
tside that Judge Catherine McCabe was environmental law - she actu-
the most recent guest in the ally helped create the field.
the issue Environmental Law and Policy "I went to law school back in
ss disor- Program's speaker series, which the 1970s to be an environmen-
oting that focuses on careers in environ- tal lawyer," McCabe said of her
eening at mental law. time at Columbia University
ury clinic McCabe discussed her career Law School. "The only problem
ical Cen- as a pioneer in the field of envi- was, when I got there, there
time that ronmental law, beginning in the was only one course on environ-
estigation 1970s, just as environmental mental law. It had hardly been
of PTSD laws were first being enacted. invented."
nce 2007. McCabe used her experience, After gaining experience
s of inves- first as a private lawyer and later in other areas of law, McCabe
as a federal attorney and judge, worked on a landmark environ-
Call:#734-418-4115
Email: dailydisplay@gmail.com

e
ri
r
y
ri
e
ri
e
e

RELEASE DATE- Wednesday, November 14, 2012
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
ACROSS DOWN 35 Serious hostilities 46 Many a low-
1 Harebrained 1 Winterwear 37 Dissuaded budget film
prank 2"You said it, 38 Racketor rocket 47 Totally square
6 Casino freebie sister!" extension 48 Low, moist area
10 Slow-cooked 3 Crop threat 39 Booty 51 Leafy veggie
entree 4 It might need a 41 Gambling town 52 Correspond
14 End of a series boost on I-80 53 Manya high-
15 Away from the 5 Andre 3000, for 42Schemed budgetfilm
breeze one 43 Convertible sofa 54 Gameof world
16 The gallbladder is 6 Beckon 44 Castle and Cara domination
shaped likeone 7 Pats on 45 "Whether _ 55 Skills
17 Noted pancakes, maybe nobler...": 59 Cut from the
storyteller 8Arrayofchoices Hamlet staff
15 Circulate, as 9 Dog's breeding ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
library books history
19 Like some 10Impact sounds A L UM I R A M U L C H
borrowed library 11 Result of a sad H E R A D I N E E M I L E
books story? A I N T G O N N A H A P P E N
20 Blasttause 1I 2nitatinon a A S T R G O G O I S M
2r Goad name for a fitional take
Gateway City gun 13 Take forcibly H E F T L E A R Y
dealer? 22 Place for a price NOW A Y J O S E V E N T S
24Sluggingpc.,e.g. 23Appeartobe E S A U O N T M O S C B
25sBe readyfor) 24fRead qickly A IC8R 1D R E ti M 0N I R E
26Goodnamefora 26Pullanall-nighter, T A P P E D T E C S N A P
BindyCitynudist maybe 0 R F 0 E Y E A H R I G H T
festival? 27 Contain A
31 Air traffic control 28 One put on a M C S THA A T E
device pedestal
3Thing 2 itt"mnon o F A T C H A N C E 0 F T H A T
33'"Holy Toledo!" 30Off-td. coneyance A L 01H A GO ADI 0 A R a
36 The Bard's river 33 User-editedsite B E R E T T D S P I N K
37 Dig dinto l 34 Broken mirror, say xwordeditor@aot.com 11/14/12
39 Andean capital 1 2 3 a 5 s 7 8 9 112 3
40ActressHarrisof , 2 0 a o e 0 t t ar 1s
4hirtysomething" 14 15 16
4t Stink
42 WodSeries 17 18t19,
game
43 Good name fora w0 a,2m91s
Motor City 04 2
butcher shop?
4it Certiable te or at as 3m
49 Civildistrban2e
50 Good name for 31 32 5 34 35
an Empire City
mdytclab? as 7 58 59
53 Geologictime 41 42
frame.
56 Colorless s 44 4s
57 Fall from above
58 Swinelike beast 46 47 4s49
60 Justositting 5051 St3 045
around
61 Hamburg's river 7 5 St
62 Are
63 Didn't letout of 0 or s2
one's sight
64 They're below s t5
average
65 Floors By tanScha s.hoh 11/14/12
(c20TrbuneiaMediaStrvic eIn. 1/41

ATTORNEY NEAR CAMPUS
Free consultation
Daniel Meisels Esq. 734.277.8814
THESIS EDITING. LANGUAGE,
organization, format. All disciplines.
734/996-0566 or writeon@iserv.net
HELP WANTED
STUDENTPAYOUTS.COM
Paid survey takers need in A2.
100% FREE to join. Click on Surveys.

CAMPUS MANAGEMENT, INC.
invites you to visit
www.CampusMgt.com
the best local website for a wide selec-
tion of apartments and houses. We spe-
cialize in houses and apartments very
close to central campus. All are attrac-
tively priced, most include parking,
many are furnished and some include
utilities. Contact us for details. Com-
plete listing for Fall 2013 available
now! Or call and speak with our
Leasing Consultant, Pat at
734-663-4101.
CENTRAL CAMPUS
6 and 7 bedroom houses
great furniture/decor
ethernet and wireless
free laundry and parking
for rent NOW for May 2013
horvathproperties.com or call
(734) 972-7368
AVAIL FALL '13: 5 & 6 bdrm houses
www.joycea2.com or (610) 952-5269
or email louisbreskman@gmail.com
AWESOME NEWER 6- Bedrm furn.
apts. Rent 1-6 bdrms, individual leases
for F 13,Walk to Central Campus. 734-
418-2050. www.828greenapts.com
ARBOR PROPERTIES
Award-Winning Rentals in Kerrytown,
Central Campus, Old West Side,
Burns Park. Now Rentitng for 2013.
734-994-3157. www.arhorprops.com
6 BEDROOM APTS. Central A/C.
819 S. State #2. May lease.
734-332-6000. carlsonproperties.com
811 S. DIVISION 4 bedrooms, 1 bath,
parking, laundry, $1900/month. Avail
Fall 2013. dklemptner@comcast.net
WE ARE TAKING
RESERVATIONS for 2013/2014
You've seen all the rest, NOW rent
with the BEST!
This is where U belong
UNIVERSITY TOWERS
Affordable ON Campus Apartments
SOLD OUT IN MAY LAST YEAR,
DON'T WAIT UNTIL IT'S TOO
LATE.
Visit us at
www.universitytowers-mi.com
536 S. Forest Ave.
Ann Arbor, MI 48104
734-761-2680

FALL 2013 HOUSES
# Beds Location Reri
7 1129 White St $4200
6 605 Catherine $3720
6 605 E.Hoover $3800
5 910 Greenwood $3600
4 505 Sauer (May) $2440
4 809 Sybil $2340
4 1010 Cedar Bend $2200
4 1037 Packard $2400
Tenants pay all utilities.
CAPPO/DEINCO
734-996-1991
FALL 2013. 1106 Michigan Ave. large
house w/6+ parking, $3400/mo, call
734-674-5192 realtcapital@gmail.com
HAVE YOU HEARD...?
We have BRAND NEW LUXURY
APARTMENTS ON
THE 2ND FLOOR
We are taking reservations for
2013/2014
The 2nd Floor apartments are
Right on Central Campus with the
Best
amenities,
the Bestservice and the Best prices!
Youve seen all the rest, NOW rent
with the BEST!
734-761-2680
The2ndfloorSU.COM
WWW.HOUSING.UMICH.EDU
(734)769-7520.
1 & 2 bdrm., modern, clean, quiet
5 mi. walk. Free Wi-Fi.
WIN
DOiTHE,

mental case involving chem-
cal dumping in the Love Canal
neighborhood in Niagara Falls,
N.Y. She also participated in the
creation of The Comprehensive
Environmental Response, Com-
pensation, and Liability Act - a
law passed by Congress in 1980
establishing regulations for
chemical and hazardous waste
management.
McCabe worked for 22 years
in the Environment and Natu-
ral Resources Division of the
U.S. Department of Justice,
and served as Deputy Chief of
the Environmental Enforce-
ment Section from 2001 to
2005.w
Starting in 2005, she served
for sevenyears as Principal Dep-
uty Assistant Administrator of
the EPA's Office of Enforcement
and Compliance Assurance. She
currently serves on the EPA's
Court of Appeals as one of three
judges.
"You are in all sorts of differ-
ent stages," McCabe said. "Won-
dering, A, whether you want a
career in environmental law,
and B, If you want one, how do
you get one."
After tracing her long career
path, McCabe opened the floor
up to questions from the audi-
ence, which included a mix of
first, second and third-year law
students.
Law student Mega Williams
said she came to the seminar to
hear about McCabe's rich expe-
rience in the field.
"I wanted to hear a little bit
more about careers in envi-
ronmental law and I know
that Catherine has had a really
amazing career, or careers, so
that's what I was hoping to hear
about," Williams said.
Because of the recent diffi-
culty law graduates have find-
ing employment, many students
attended to hear more about the
realities of obtaining a job in the
field of environmental law.
Law student Sam Ellingson,
who recently joined the law
school's Environmental Law
Society, said she is concerned
about the competitiveness of the
field.
"I feel like, there is a lim-
ited amount of jobs in the envi-
ronmental sphere in general,"
Ellingson said, adding that she
came to hear advice from
McCabe for law graduates who
want to work in environmental
law.
For students like Ellingson
who are worried about job pros-
pects, McCabe advised students
to create their own opportuni-
ties, as she did.
McCabe pointed out that
students now entering the field
might have more opportunities
since many of her colleagues are
nearing retirement.
"What you have to be is pro-
active," McCabe said. "To be out
there and finding those oppor-
tunities because you don't know
when and where they are going
to come up."

! NORTH CAMPUS 1-2 Bdrm. !
! Riverfront/Heat/Water/Parking. !
! wwwHRPAA~com 996-4992!t
! STERLING 411 LOFTS - Reserve
now for 2013 (Spring or fall). U-Ms
BEST housing sold out early 2012. Re-
serve your space for 2013 today. 2
blocks from Central Campus and down-
town. I to 4 bedroom, private baths
available. Rates from $665. 734-998-
4400 www.4elevetnlofts.com
!!!!NOW LEASING FALL 2013!!!!
Great Location! HOUSES, I and 2 br.
apts, studios. All properties across
from
East Quad. pkg, laundry.
www.churclhstreetrentals.coto
734-320-1244.
!!LARGE CENTRAL
CAMPUS HOMES!!
www.nancylat.com 734 663-1370
**3 BEDROOM HOUSE** Newly
renovated. Near Yost. Off-street park-
ing & laundry. Call: (734)223-7777,
**4 BEDROOM HOUSE** Beautiful
home. Near B-School. Off-street park-
ing &,laundry. Call: (734)223-7777

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan