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November 08, 2012 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2012-11-08

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2A - Thursday, November 8, 2012

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com
ltie Midijgan ail
420 Maynard St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1327
www.michigandaily.com
JOSEPH LICHTERMAN 'RACHEL GREINETZ
Editor in Chief eaBsiness Manager
734-410-4115 ex. 1252 734-415-4115 en". 1241
lichterman@michigandaily.com rmgrein@michigandaily.com

SLAM DUNK

The mechanics of memory

Why did you choose to
come to the University of
Michigan?
First and foremost it was
the people. I really love the
energy and engagement of
the people here, both faculty
and students. There is also an
amazing amount of research
thathappens here, across a lot
of different departments and
schools, yet despite the size
of the University of Michigan,
there is still a great sense of
collaboration and community.

This semester I am teachin
a seminar entitled Neurobiol
ogy of Learned Fear. The goa
is to focus on one type of mem
ory task - fear conditioning -
and discuss how the research
on this task has advanced ou
understanding of learning an
memory.
How did you becom,
interested in researchini
learning and memory? Haw
you been able to incorporat(
any of your research result
into your teaching?

g research that was happening
- at my undergraduate depart-
.1 ment, particularly in my men-
- tor's lab. I stayed interested
- because learning is an expe-
h rience we all have - we are
x always learning. Memory is
d fundamental to how we view
ourselves, how we think of
the past, how we behave in the
e future, and how we feel. But
g what we don't know is how
e the brain stores memory, what
e causes abnormal memories,
s and how so we can remember
so much.
n -HALEY GLATTHORN
t This interview was Students p
e conducted via e-mail. Campus In
CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES

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4

4

What classes are you I became interested i
teaching this semester? learning and memory
first because that was th
CRIME NOTES
Library looting Phony call

it
a,
U

perform ata poetry slam sponsored by the Center for
nvolvement at the Michigan Union on Wednesday.

WHERE: Shapiro
Undergraduate Library
WHEN: Wednesday at
about 3:40 p.m.
WHAT: A Bert's Cafe
register was apparently
missing $122, University
Police reported. There
is a potential suspect,
however the investigation
is currently pending.

WHERE:C.S. Mott
Children's and Von
Voigtlander Women's
Hospital
WHEN: Wednesday at
10:20 a.m.
WHAT: A woman recieved
a harassing phone call from
an acquaintence, University
Police reported. She was
given appropriate guidance.

Ridin' dirty Pulled it off

Flu shots
offered
WHAT: Students will be
able to recieve flu shots for
$25 without insurance or
for free with certain accept-
ed insurance.
WHO: Michigan Visiting
Care
WHEN: Today at 6 p.m.
WHERE: North Campus
Recreation Building
Learn how to
negotiate
WHAT: A workshop will
introduce women to skills
they can use to combat
gender gap in wages and the
working world.
WHO: The Career Center
WHEN: Today from 3 p.m.
to 5 p.m.
WHERE: Student Activities
Building

Penny Stamps
lecture
WHAT: Graphic designer
Stephan Sagmeister will
discuss his art and how to
be happy as a designer.
WHO: Penny W. Stamps
School of Art & Design
WHEN: 5:10 p.m. to 6:30
p.m.
WHERE: Michigan The-
ater
CORRECTIONS
* An article puhlished
in the Nov. 7 edition
of The Michigan Daily
("Students react to
President's victory")
incorrectly stated that
Proposal 1 was approved.
It was voted down.
* Please report any
error in the Daily to
corrections@michi-
gandaily.com.

Five Harvard Univer-
sity students became
the first to send a
hamburger into space
when local burger restaurant
b.good sponsored the project
for about $1,000, Boston.com
reported. The burger hit an
altitude of 98,000 ft.
Masters student Jon
Brown and his girl-
fiend, Sarah Chabot,
make chamber music
more accessible by hosting
free concerts in their living
room. n FOR MORE, SEE
NYC startup BioLite,
is selling campstoves
that double as a power
outlet and USB port for
charging ihones, The New
York Times reported. It has
been marketing its product to
those still without power in
the wake of Hurricane Sandy.

EDITORIAL STAFF
AndrewWeiner ManagingEditor . anweiner@michigandaily.com
Bethanp Bion ManaingN sEt r H biron@nGhigandaily.com
SNIOsRNES EDOnRoS:naeGattorsn,t ale oeraaoldsmith,
Paige Pearcy, Adam Rubenfire
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITORS: Giacomo Bologna, Anna Rozenberg Andrew Schulman,
PeterShahin,,K.C.Wassan
Timothy Rabb and opinioneditors@michigandaily.com
Adrienne Roberts Editorial PagetEditors
SENIOR EDITORIALPAGEEDITORS:MelanieKruvelis,HarshaNahata,VanessaRychlinski
ASSISTANTEDITORIAL PAGEEDITORS:Jesse Klein,Sarah Skaluba
Stephen Nesbitt Managing Sports Editor nesbitt@michigandaily.com
SENIOR SPORTS EDITORS: Everett Cook, Ben Estes, Zach Helfand, Luke Pasch,
Neal Rothschild, Matt Slovin
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITORS Steven Braid, MichaeltLaurila, Matt Spelich,
Colleen Thomas,LizVukelich,DanielWasserman
Leah Bargin ManagingArtsEditor burgin@michigandaily.com
SENIOR ARTS EDITORS:^Elliot Alpern, David Tao,Kayla Upadhyaya
ASSISTANTARTSEDITORS:JacobAxelrad,LarenCaserta,MattEaston,KellyEtz,
^"naaSadovskaya,ChloeStachowiak
Erin Kirkland and photo@michigandaily.com
Alden Reiss Mannging PhononEditors
SNIOR P O EDSTerraMoengraffToddNeedle
ASSISTANT PHOTOEDITORS:AdamGlanzman,Austen Hufford, Allison Kruske
MarleneLacasse,AdamSchnitzer
Alicia KOvalcheck and design@michigandaily.com
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DeUTY MA aIEITORZachaBergson,KaitlinWilliams
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BUSINESS STAFF
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SeanJackson salesManager
SophieiGreenbaum Production Manager
Connor Byrd Finance Manager
Meryl HultengNational Account Manager
The Michigan aly (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and
winterterms by students at the University of Michigan. One copy is available free of charge
to all readers. Additional copies may be picked up at the Daily's office for $2. Subscriptions for
fall term,starting in September, via UsS. mail are$110. Winter term (January through April) is
$115, yearlong(eptember through April)is $19. University affiliatesare subject to areduced
subscriptionrate.On-campssubscriptionsforfalIltermare$5.Subscriptionsmustbeprepaid.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The AssociatedPress and The Associated CollegiatePress.

0

4

WHERE: Depot Street
WHEN: Tuesday at about
8:20 p.m.
WHAT: A driver was
arrested, cited twice then
later released after he was
found to be driving with
a suspended license and
not having registration,
University Police reported.

WHERE: Thayer
Administrative Building
WHEN: Tuesday at about
11:45 an.
WHAT: Fabric was torn
from the walls in the lobby
sometime between Nov.
2 and Nov. 6, University
Police reported. There are
no suspects.

LA County voters mandate
condom use on porn sets

Industry plans to B passed 56 percent to 44 percent
in Tuesday's election.
sue in response to The measure requires adult
film producers to apply for A per-
decision mit from the county Department
of Public Health to shoot sex
LOS ANGELES (AP) - Los scenes. Permit fees will finance
Angeles County voters have periodic inspections of film sets
approved a measure requiring to enforce compliance.
porn performers to wear con- The AIDS Healthcare Founda-
doms while filming sex scenes, tion, which sponsored the-initia-
prompting a pledge by the adult tive, says the measure will help
entertainment industry to sue to safeguard the public, ap well as
overturn the measure. porn workers, from sexually
With 100 percent of the corn- transmitted infections.
ty's precincts reporting, Measure But the adult film industry,
THE NEW LINE CHINESE CUISINE
dCARRYOUT AND n
SPECIALIZING INH NONG KONG,TAIWANESE,
SZECNUAN & NUNAN STYLES
WE SERVE A LCOHOL
734-995-1786
116 S. MAIN STREET OPEN 7 DAYS
(BETWEEN W. HURON AND WASHTENAW) I
DOWNTOWN ANN ARBOR FRI& SAT 11-11
WWW.KAIGARDEN.COM SUN 12-10
H,.,

which is largely centered in the
San Fernando Valley in suburban
Los Angeles, says the requirement
is unnecessary since the industry
already polices itself by requiring
performers to undergo monthly
tests for HIV and other infections.
The industry also says porn
viewers will not watch sex scenes
with condoms, forcing adult film
producers to relocate to where
they can make movies that will
sell.
On Wednesday, the Free
Speech Coalition, a trade group
representing the adult entertain-
ment industry, said it plans to file
a lawsuit to overturn the condom
requirement on constitutional
grounds.
"We believe in the calm, seri-
ous deliberations of the legal sys-
tem, we will find that Measure B
is in fact unconstitutional," Diane
Duke, the coalition's executive
director, said in a statement."The
adult film industry will not just
stand by and let it destroy our
business."
In a letter sent to the county
BoardofSupervisors,theindustry
also requested that it be involved
in discussions as to how the coun-
ty will implement the require-
ments. It will also explore moves
to neighboring states as soon as
possible, the coalition said.
"While the AIDS Healthcare
Foundation has tried to portray
any move of jobs outside of L.A.
County as unrealistic, the hard
truth of the matter is that is exact-
ly what this industry plans on
doing now," said James Lee, com-
munications director for the No
on Government Waste Commit-
tee, which opposed the measure.
Michael Weinstein, president
of the AIDS Healthcare Founda-
tion, said he is not fazed by threats
of a lawsuit or of relocation. The
issue is one of public health and
safety for workers who run a high
risk for sexually transmitted ill-
nesses, he said.
The industry argument did
not convince voters, he said.
"There was a very high degree
of awareness about this proposi-
tion," he said. "Voters were edu-
cated about it."

s6
JASON MINICK/AP
Former Penn State University President Graham Spanier and his wife Sandra enter Harrisburg, Pa. District Judge William Wenner's office on
Wednesday.
Former Penn State president
arraigned, no plea entere

Spanier released
on bail for charges
related to cover-up
of Sandusky scandal
HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) -
Former Penn State president
Graham Spanier was arraigned
and released on bail at a brief
court appearance Wednesday on
charges he lied about and con-
cealed child sex abuse allega-
tions involving former assistant
football coach Jerry Sandusky.
Spanier, accompanied by his
wife, signed paperwork after his
bail was set at $125,000, but he
was not required to post any of
that amount. He was ordered to
forfeit his passport and be finger-
printed. He didn't enter a plea.
Afterward, defense attorney
Elizabeth Ainslie told reporters
her client is "not guilty, abso-
lutely" and disputed prosecu-
tors' claims Spanier conspired
with university athletic director
Tim Curley and vice president
Gary Schultz. She said Spanier,
who testified before agrand jury
in the matter, has not been given

the opportunity to present his
side of the story.
"This wasn't a conspiracy of
silence," she said, echoing the
charge made last week by state
Attorney General Linda Kelly.
"That is ridiculous."
Spanier, 64, was charged last
week with perjury, obstruction,
endangering the welfare of chil-
dren, failure to properly report
suspected abuse and conspir-
acy for his actions in response
to complaints about Sandusky
showering with children.
Spanier has claimed he is being
framed for political purposes.
He served as Penn State's
president for 16 years but was
forced out a year ago after San-
dusky was charged along with
Curley and Schultz, who were
two of Spanier's top underlings.
Spanier is on paid leave as a
member of the faculty.
Along with the charges
against Spanier, prosecutors
added counts against Curley and
Schultz. They were arraigned
Thursday. District judge Wil-
liam Wenner told Spanier and
his lawyers the Nov. 16 prelimi-
nary hearing date would likely
be delayed a month or two.

Curley, the athletic director
on leave until the final year of
his contract expires, and Schul-
tz, now retired, await trial early
next year on charges of failure to
report suspected abuse and per-
jury. Like Spanier, they deny the
allegations.
On Monday, state prosecutors
filed paperwork telling the judge
in the earlier Curley and Schultz
case they did not object to their
request to delay the planned Jan.
7 start of that trial. The attorney
general's office said it would seek
to combine those charges, the
new charges, and Spanier's case.
The latest charges came
almost exactly a year after
details of the case against San-
dusky sent a maelstrom through
State College, toppling long-
time head coach Joe Paterno
and eventually leading to severe
NCAA sanctions against the
football team.
Sandusky, 68, vigorously
contested the charges but was
convicted in June of 45 counts
of abuse of boys, including vio-
lent sexual attacks inside cam-
pus facilities. He was sentenced
last month to 30 to 60 years in
prison.

We

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