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November 06, 2012 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 2012-11-06

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The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

Tuesday, November 6, 2012 - 3

Enthusiasm for election
wanes in light of 2008
Experts: Students Heaney said many college in national programs like Teach
students look at what Obama has for America help make it a unique
less inspired four done as president and see-a lot of place where political activism
later things they like in comparison to thrives just as strongly in 2012 as
years lRepublican presidential candidate it did in past decades.
Mitt Romney, particularly in "Although we're not in the
By STEVE ZOSKI regards to affordable health care, streets, the things that students
Daily StaffReporter marriage equality and support for do on Michigan's campus impact
the DREAMAct. policy and impact the world
On the night of President "Obama's done a lot of things around them," Styer said. "(it)
Barack Obama's historic victory that appeal to college-age is just as important and just as
in 2008, shouts of celebration students, it's just that people powerful as it was back in the
rang out throughout Ann Arbor aren't angry. The Republicans sixties."
as thousands of students united have not been delivering the goods LSA senior Nora Stephens, an
together on the Diag. to young people, the Democrats intern for the Obama campaign
Though many students remain have, Obama has," Heany said. who runs the Facebook page
supportive of the president this Heaney said the high "Wolverines for Obama,"
year, a victory for Obama on expectations for Obama's first volunteered for the Obama
Election Day might not lead to term, coupled with realistic campaign in 2008 while she was a
quite as rowdy of a celebration in achievements of a typical senior in high school. She wrote in
2008, according to officials. president, have generated some an e-mail interview that she does
Political Science Prof. Michael disappointment. not feel students are less excited
Heaney said the decreased "Obama just hasn't been the about Obama this election cycle,
enthusiasm for the election is same inspiring speaker he was "I think now, more than last
partly due to the special nature of four years ago," Heaney said. "And time, students have proof that
the 2008 election, in which many we had kind of made Obama out to President Obama has done things
voters desired major changes in be something, a 'superman-like' that benefit them," Stephens
the direction of the country. character, a real hero. And what's wrote. "Through enacting the
"People, especially on college turned out, the truth of the matter Affordable Care Act that allows
campuses, were very unhappy is, four years later what we know young people to stay on their
with President George W. Bush - is Obama is a regular politician, parent's insurance plan until they
the Iraq War in particular, (that just like the rest of them. He's are 26, doublingPell grantfunding
was) something that a lot of young not superman, and he's also not and establishing a college tax
people were against, and so there Doctor Evil either." credit so that students of all levels
were years of frustration and University alum Nathaniel of affluence can attend college,
anger about that," Heaney said. Eli Coats Styer, who served as President Obama has consistently
Heaney said the college the chair of the University's stood up for issues that affect us
voters of 2008 were part of a chapter of College Democrats in students and young people."
generation that had experienced 2008, said jubilations could be Stephens added that students
Sept. 11 at a young age, and grew heard across campus each time who fell this election is less
up with resentment toward the Obama won a state, leading to a important should research
Iraq War. He added that the spontaneous victory march across Obama's policies and take note of
"articulate and inspiring" Obama campus. However, he said 2012 is his interest in advancing causes
- who promised to eventually a different kind of election. important to young people, such
end combat operations in Iraq - "I don't think you can as higher education funding, and
offered a chance to make history necessarily compare the compare them to the plans of
and spur change. enthusiasm of electing the first Romney.
Heaney said for students, black president, and also the first "I would hope that after
the prospect of electing Obama president after the Bush years ... thorough research, fellow
instilled "a sense that all things because this year the mission is Wolverines would see the stark
are possible" which generated a so much more about continuing differences between , the two
strongsense of excitement. the path that Obama has put us candidates in terms of their
According to Heaney, college on and what that has done for records and where they plan to
students may be less enthused our economy and our education take the country," Stephens wrote.
for the election this year because system .... it's a different kind of "I hope they will find, like I have,
they don't have the same desire to enthusiasm," Styer said. that President Obama has fought
remove the incumbent from office He added that the University's for young people on every issue
and are generally move favorable academic programs, student that matters to us."
toward Obama than Bush organizations and strong presence
11th annualFast-A-Thon event
raises awareness on food issues

51 EVEN SENNE/Ar
Democratic candidate for the U.S. Senate Elizabeth Warren, center, hugs a supporter at the conclusion of a campaign rally
at a high school in Braintree, Mass.
Mass. Senate candidates
-make last -minute appeal

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rmer Gov. Weld agenda.
Weld recalled being with
en. Kerry make Brown on the final weekend
in 2010 before Brown won
appearances the special election to fill the
Senate seat left vacant by the
AINTREE, Mass. (AP) death of longtime Democratic
epublican U.S. Sen. Scott Sen. Edward Kennedy.
tn and Democratic rival "It was man versus machine
beth Warren were joined then and it's still man versus
ay on the campaign trail machine today. The reason
vo former political rivals as that doesn't change is that
scrapped for votes in the the machine never rests, the
nghoursofMassachusetts' machine never sleeps," Weld
ing U.S. Senate race. said Sunday. "All it does is say,
rmer Republican Gov. 'I want some more automatic
am Weld campaigned votes for higher taxes."'
Brown at a rally Sunday Brown, speaking to the
iston's Faneuil Hall, while cheering crowd packed into
ocratic Sen. John Kerry the historic venue, cast himself
d Warren at a campaign as he has throughout the
at Braintree High School. campaign, as an independent
eld characterized the voice who puts people over
n and Warren race as party and weighs each bill
versus machine," while to see how it will effect
y said he needed Warren Massachusetts residents before
partner in the Senate to voting.
push President Obama's He also portrayed Warren

as a' lockstep Democrat who
will push for higher taxes and
bigger government at a time
when the nation is struggling
with soaring deficits.
"People are hurting. They
want to work," Brown said. "My
answer is to work together, find
that common ground, try to
push back against the extremes
on both sides and actually solve
problems."
Kerry, speaking later to
a packed crowd at a school
auditorium in Braintree,
whipped up Warren supporters
by offering a harsh critique of
Mitt Romney and calling the
{ Massachusetts Senate race
pivotal for the future of the
country.
"We can decide who controls
the United States Senate. This
race is about that," Kerry said.
"I need a partner in the United
States Senate who's going
to stand up and fight for the
agenda of Barack Obama."

380 students unite
to shed light on local
food challenges
By ASHWINI NATARAJAN
Daily StaffReporter
Though students weren't
pitted against each other in a
televised fight to the death, they
experienced their own version of
the Hunger Games on Monday.
At the University's Muslim
Student Association's 11th
annual Fast-A-Thon event, titled
"The Real Hunger Games,"
members worked to fundraise
and raise awareness of global
and local hunger on campus
and in the Ann Arbor area.
At 4:45 p.m., about 380
students broke their fast that
lasted from sunrise to sunset
on Monday with a feast of
traditional Mediterranean
food. Throughout the meal,
ravenous participants engaged
in lively table discussions on
hunger and food equity issues
while food , justice activist
Sheelah Muhammad delivered
an address about hunger in'
Chicago and spoken-word
artist Zain Shamoon performed
at the Rackham Amphitheater.
MSA president Zeinab
Khalil, an LSA junior, said the
event was designed to educate
members of the University
community about food
disparities.
"This year our goal is to raise
awareness about the issues of

hunger and food justice, which
are pressing problems in the
metro-Detroit community, but
don't receive much awareness,"
Khalil said. "We hope to bring
together the campus community
to discuss these issues because
we believe, all people should
have easy, consistent access to
wholesome and affordable food.
Khalil added that the
experience of fasting for an
entire day serves as an eye-
opening, enlightening glimpse
into the greater issues of the
community.
"Fast-A-Thon is a way to bring
together people from all across
campus to humble ourselves
for a day and break out of our
routines. It's a way to remind us
of our common humanity and
connections to others," Khalil
said.
In the spirit of raising local
awareness about hunger, MSA
donated all proceeds of Fast-A-
Thon to Forgotten Harvest, an
organization that aims to reduce
hunger in metro Detroit by
obtaining surplus prepared and
perishable food and reallocating
it to emergency food providers.
LSA sophomore Betul
Tatar, the MSA community
service co-chair, said she chose
Forgotten Harvest as the event's
charity to further educate
the community about the
imminence of hunger in its own
backyard.
"This year, we chose
Forgotten Harvest because
hunger is a big issue that we
don't really realize in our own

metro-Detroit area," Tatar said.
"One in five are hungry in the
Detroit area, which is a huge
number."
LSA freshman Syed Ferdous,
a member of MSA's Community
Service Committee, said he
believes the act of fasting is a
humbling experience.
"It's just getting back to
my roots; it instills a sense of
solidarity with the Detroit-area
poor, and it also renews a sense
of humility within me," Ferdous
said. "I'm given everything
pretty much. These people, they
struggle to put a plate of food on
the table every day."
University students who
aren't members of MSA also
participated in Fast-A-Thon and
they said they also gained vast
perspective from the fasting
experience.
LSA junior Eryn Smith said
though she has traveled to India
and Nicaragua and seen poverty
firsthand, being part of Fast-A-
Thon gave her a new perspective
of her experiences.
"I feel more compassion to
people who are facing hunger,
and (I want) to do more to help,"
Smith said.
LSA junior Katie Brill echoed
Smith's sentiments, and said
it made her grateful for her
personal opportunities and
abilities.
"Whenever I'm fasting, it's a
really good time to reflect and
think about day-to-day life and
how lucky I am that I can get
access to food every day," Brill
said.

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