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October 31, 2012 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2012-10-31

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News

2A - Wednesday October 31, 2012

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

40

. ..... ........

PLATES AND POLITICS BRINGS OPPOSING OPINIONS TOGETHER
Students enjoy food, debate

+ tol#idg 0aiIy
420 Maynard St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1327
www.michigandaily.com
JOSEPH.LICHTERMAN RACHEL GREINETZ
EditorinChief Business Manager
734-418-4115 ext. 1252 734-418-4115 ext. 1241
lichtern, njmichigandailycom rgrin@michigandaily.com

Plates and Politics seeks
to merge politics with
food, a combination that
yields fruitful discussion,
LSA sophomore Samantha
Schmitz, the group's presi-
dent, said.
With Election Day just
around the corner, the group
'seeks to educate its members
about prominent issues and
policies in an attempt to cul-
tivate informed student vot-
ers leading into the election
on Tuesday. Schmitz said
as the club's president she
works to establish a com-
fortable atmosphere to talk
about political views and
explore civic engagement

through sharing meals.
"It is a place where stu-
dents can share thoughts on
a particular political topic
in a safe and welcoming
environment while enjoy-
ing a home cooked meal,"
Schmitz said.
Schmitz said she finds
that food brings together
disparate opinions no matter.
how polarized the national
political discourse is.
"Politics can definitely be
a dividing factor between
people," Schmitz said. "We
judge others based on their
political stance on an issue
rather than discussing why
they feel the way they do

about a topic. Food is a great
way to bridge those differ-
ences in feelings about poli-
tics. Who can really get mad
at someone else over a bowl
of chicken noodle soup?"
This year, most of the
group's monthly meetings
have been dominated by
election conversations, but
the group plans to share
their knowledge with other
students outside of the orga-
nization.
"The best way we've been
able to help other students
learn about the upcom-
ing election is by word of
mouth," Schmitz said.
-MOLLYBLOCK

Nesrosm
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Art and Design freshman Vasilisa Dyakonova picks out yarn on a trip
organized by Art and Design Senior Morgan Beckett. Ann Arbor art
store closings have made buying supplies difficult.

CRIME NOTES
Dine, dent and
ditch

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES
Port Huron Film showing

WHERE: University Golf
Course
WHEN: Monday at about
11:35 p.m.
WHAT: A truck damaged a
parked vehicle at a tailgating
area, University Police
reported. The offender drove
away before identification.
Aching for a
laptop
WHERE: University
Hospital
WHEN: Monday at about
12:25 p.m.
WHAT: A University-owned
laptop was taken from the
first level of the hospital
between Oct.12 and 14,
University Police reported.

The scent of
the pot
WHERE: Northwood IV
WHEN: Monday at about
8:05 p.m.
WHAT: There was a smell
of smoke reported that was
determined to originate
from apot left on a stove,
University Police reported.
The resident shut off the
stove upon returning home.
No damaged reported.

Statement
Conference
WHAT: "A New Insur-
gency: ThePort Huron
Statement in its Time and
Ours is a three-day confer-
ence that marks the 50th
anniversary of The Port
Huron Statement, a historic
1962 manifesto of Students
for a Democratic Society
(SDS, and an inspiration for
the name of The Michgian
Daily's newsmagazine, The
Statement. Keynote peakers
include Jounrnalist Ruth
Rosen, a professor emerita
at the University of Cali-
fornia at Davis and Activist
Tom Hayden, a Daily alum
and SDS founder.
WHO: Teaching and
Technology Collaborative
WHEN: Today through
Friday
WHERE: Various locations
on campus

WHAT: Author Mina Shin
will dicuss the representa-
tion of ethnic minorities in
South Korean cinema, and
how demographic changes
are represented in film.
WHO: Nam Center for
Korean Studies
WHEN: Today at 4 p.m.
WHERE: School of Social
Work Building room 1636
CORRECTIONS
" An Oct.26 article in the
Daily ("CSG contemplates
altered policies in wake of
election") misrepresented
the maximum amount
of funds a student can
contribute to a Central
Student Government
campaign. The maximum
is $150 per student; a
single student could not
donate $950 to campaigns
as suggested in the article.

TH REE THINGS YOU
SHOULD KNOW TODAY
A Fla. mother is suing
her daughter's daycare
after determining that
a used condom that the
3-year old girl placed in her
mouth tested postive for
Gonorrhea, The Huffington
Post reported. The young
girl found the condom on the
daycare's playground.
Author of the Port
Huron Statement Tom
Hayden, musing on
Mitt Romney and atrip
to a gun range in rural
Pa in a special elections issue.
>> FOR MORE, SEE
THE STATEMENT INSIDE
3 A 14-year-old
reportedly died of a
caffeine overdose after
she drank two cans of
Monster, Popular Science
reported. The Journal of
Caffeine Research says
overdose for adults is roughly
10 grams of caffeine. There is
usually 1 to 2 mg of caffeine
per drink.

EDITORIALSTAFF
AndrewWeiner Managing Editor anweiner@michigandailycom
BethtanytBimn ManagngewsErediton biron@michigandailycm
SENIORN EITORS:aeyGlaEton, HaleyGoldberRay I hGodmit,h
Pe earyenAdam enire,
ASSISTA NEWsED I 1ORS: Katie Burke, Anna Rozenberg, Peter Shahin, Taylor
Wzner
Timothy Rabb and opinioneditors@michiandaily.com
Adrienne Roberts Editorial Page Editors
SENIOR EDITORIALPAGE EDITORS:MelanieKruvelis,Harsha Nahata,VanessaRychlinski
ASSISTANT EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS: Jesse Klein, Sarah Skaluba
Stephen Nesbitt Managing SportstEditor nesbitt@mikhigandaity.com
SENIOR SPORTS EDITORS: Everett Cook, Ben Estes, Zach Helfand, Luke Pasch
NealRothschild,MattSlovin
ASSSTA NTSPORTSEDITORS:StevnBraMchaelLaurila, MattSpelich,
ColleenThomasLiz.'Vuklih,el Wsemaen
Leah Burgin Managing Arts Editor burgin@michigandaily.eom
SENIOR ARTS EDITORS: Elliot Alpern, DavidTao,Kayla Upadhyaya
AssIsTANT ARTS EDITORS:JacobAxelrad, LarenCaserta, Matt Easton, Kelly Etz,
Erin Kirkland and photo@michigandailyaom
Alden Reiss Managing Photo Editors
SENIORPHOTO EDITORS;TerraMolengraff,ToddNeedle
ASSISTANTPHOTO EDITORS: AdamGlanzman, Austen Hufford, Allison Kruske
MareneLacasse,AdamSchnitzer
Alicia Kovalcheckand design@michigandaily.com
Amy Mackens Managing Design Editors
DylantCintiand statement@michigandaily.com
Jennifer Xu Magazine Editors
DEPUTY MAGAZINE EDITOR: Zach Bergson, Kaitlin Wiliams
HannahPoindexter copy chief copydesk@michigandaily.com
SENIOR COPY EDITORS: Josephine Adams, Beth Coplowitz
BUSINESSSTAFF
AshleyKaradsheh Associate Eusiness Manager
Sean Jackson Sales Manager
Sophie Greenbaum Production Manager
ConnorByrd Finance Manager
Meryl Hulteng National Account Manager
The Michigan Daily(ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday duringthe fall and
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$yria activists report 23 dead outside Damascus

A
dea

BEI
by Syr
tanks 1
a resti
Damas
18 peoj
fighter
with
said.
The
Douma
left res
huge e
their h
bodies,
eos pos
Scen
those I
have g
rebels
dent B

bout 150 daily gains on the ground, and Assad's
forces have responded with
ths reported in overwhelming air power.
In the past weeks, anti-regime
recent weeks activists say about 150 people
have been killed a day in fighting.
of uprising Since the uprising against Assad
began in March 2011, they say
RUT (AP) - Airstrikes 35,000 have died.
ian jets and shells from Tuesday's airstrikes came a
eveled a neighborhood in dayafterwhatactivistscalledthe
ve city near the capital of heaviest and most widespread
cus on Tuesday, killing bombing campaign nationwide,
ple, and at least five rebel on what was to be the final day
s died nearby in clashes of an internationally sanctioned
regime troops, activists truce that never took hold.
The death toll for what was
airstrikes on the city of supposed to be a four-day cease-
a, northeast of the capital, fire ending Monday exceeded
idents scampering over a 500.
xpanse of rubble andusing Activists speculated that the
sands to dig up mangled government's heavy reliance on
according to activist vid- air power reflected its inability to
ted online. roll back rebel gains, especially
es of vast destruction like in the north of the country near
from Douma on Tuesday the border with Turkey, where
rown more common as rebels have control of swathes of
seeking to topple Presi- territory.
ashar Assad have made The international community

remains at a loss about how to
stop the Syria violence. The U.S.
and other Western and Arab
nations have called on Assad to
step down, while Russia, China
and Iran continue to back him.
In the latest fighting after
nightfall Tuesday, the 'Britain-
based Syrian Observatory for
Human Rights said 18 civilians
were killed in an airstrike and
tank fire Tuesday in the Hajari-
yeh neighborhood in the suburb
of Douma, northeast of Damas-
cus.
The dead included four
women and five children, the
group said, adding that the toll
could rise as residents were still
searching through the rubble.
Five rebel fighters were also
killed in clashes with regime
forces elsewhere in Douma, the
group said.
Amateur videos posted online
showed a deep, rubble-filled
crater in the middle of what
appeared to be a poor neighbor-
hood, with many walls collapsed

in the blast.
Men were seen chanting "God
is great!" while pulling a man-
gled body from the rubble in one
video. They used their hands to
dig through cinder blocks and
cement dust in another to uncov-
er another dead body.
In yet another video, a man
standing in the destruction yells
at the camera, "These are the
accomplishments of Lakhdar
Brahimi," referring to the inter-
national envoy who proposed the
recent, failed cease-fire.
Regime airstrikes also col-
lapsed buildings in the rebel-
held northern city of Maaret
al-Numan, which straddles a key
supply route from the capital to
Aleppo, Syria's largest city and a
main front in the civil war:
Assad's regime has been
hammering away at Maaret al-
Numan, 80 kilometers (50 miles)
southwest of Aleppo, with heavy
airstrikes since it fell to rebels on
Oct. 10.
One amateur video purport-

ing to show the aftermath of an
airstrike on Tuesday showed a
man holding up the dead body
of a small girl in a red and white
shirt and baby blue pants. Other
videos showed men carrying
bloodied women and children
from destroyed buildings.
The Observatory said the day's
airstrikes on the city killed at
least seven people, four of them
children.
One video showed the bodies
of three girls wrapped in white
shrouds. Nearby, a man dripped
water on the face of a dead older
man with a white beard, saying:
"Go to heaven, dad. May God
take revenge."
The Observatory said at least
one rebel fighter was also killed
in clashes south of the city, and
regime forces were trying to
bring in reinforcements from
further south.
Activist claims and videos
could not be independently veri-
fied because of restrictions on
reporting in Syria, but the vid-

eos appeared genuine and cor-
responded with other Associated
Press reporting on the events
depicted.
Violence also flared elsewhere
in and around Damascus. The
Observatory said missiles fired
from a fighter jet struck the
capital's Jobar neighborhood -,a
rare hit in the capital's munici-
pal area. Most of the fighting
around Damascus for the past
few months has been in sub-
urbs and outskirts, where rebels
have managed to challenge the
regime.
Syria's state news agency
said an "armed terrorist group"
assassinated a high-ranking air
force general. Maj. Gen. Abdul-
lah Mahmoud al-Khalidi was
gunned down while getting out
of his car in the mostly Kurdish
neighborhood of Rukn Eddine in
Damascus.
The government views the
rebels as terrorists and accuses
them of being foot soldiers in a
foreign plot to destroy Syria.

I

GO NLI N BEFORE
STAND
IN LINE
DON'T WAIT UNTIL ELECTION DAY, TUESDAY, NOV. 6,
TO FIND OUT WHERE YOU SHOULD BE VOTING...

GO ONLINE: WWW.
MICHIGANwOV/VOTE
THE MICHIGAN.GOV/VOTE WEBSITE WILLTELL
YOU WHERE YOUR POLLING PLACE IS LOCATED
AND YOUR REGISTRATION STATUS. YOU CAN
ALSO VIEW A SAMPLE BALLOT SPECIFIC TO THE
PRECINCT IN WHICH YOU CURRENTLY RESIDE.
WHY GO ONLINE BEFORE ELECTION DAY?
" YOU MAY NOT BE REGISTERED IN ANN ARBOR
" YOU MOVED SINCE YOU LAST VOTED
GO ONLINE OR SCAN THIS OR CODE TO CHECK
YOUR POLLING PLACE ON A MOBILE DEVICE.

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