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October 22, 2012 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 2012-10-22

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The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

Monday, October 22, 2012 - 3A

The Michigan Daily - michigandailycom Monday, October 22, 2012 - 3A

NEWS BRIEFS
WIXOM, Mich.
Police release
sketch of shooting
spree suspect
Authorities have released a
drawing of a man suspected in
a series of shootings in the past
week over a three-county area of
southeastern Michigan.
Wixom police say in a release
that the sketch was obtained from
a witness to a shooting Thursday
in Ingham County.
That witness also described the
suspect's vehicle as resembling a
dark 1998 Oldsmobile Alero or a
1998 Toyota Camry.
A task force of local and state
police agencies was formed Fri-
day to investigate the 16 or more
shootings in Livingston, Oakland,
and Ingham counties. Most of the
shootings involved cars on busy
roads Tuesday through Thursday.
YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK, Calif.
Great Gray Owls
to be studied less
disruptively
Scientists working in Yosemite
National Park are eavesdropping
on forest creatures, hoping to gain
a greater understanding of a rare
subspecies of Great Gray Owls.
The raptors number fewer than
200 in and around the park, and
even the slightest human inter-
vention can disrupt their breeding
and feeding cycles.
Scientists are using data-com-
pression digital audio recorders
to capture forests sounds. They
developed software to discern
the low-frequency owl calls from
other noises in an effort to deter-
mine their numbers and rates of
reproduction.
The raptors were cut off from
their plentiful Canadian counter-
parts during the ice age 30,000
years ago. Since then scientists
have been looking for ways to pro-
tect them and better understand
their habitat-specific evolution.
KINSHASA, Congo
Three Catholic
priests abducted
from monastery
Congolese civic leaders say
that three Roman Catholic priests
were kidnapped in eastern Congo.
The three priests were taken
captive from their monastery by
about 10 gunmen Saturday night.
Omar Kavota, the Vice Presi-
dent of the North Kivu civil soci-
ety, said the abductions took place
in Beni, north of Goma, in North
Kivu province.
The three, indentified as Wasu-
kudi Anselm, 41, Jean Ndulani, 52,
and Edmond Kisughu, 53, were
tied up and taken away by the
armed men, who witnesses say
spoke Swahili.
More than a year ago, in the
same area, Dr. Paluku Mukongo-
ma, medical director of the Gener-
al Hospital Oicha, was kidnapped

and nothing has been heard of him
or of his abductors.
. BISSAU, Guinea-Bissau
Six killed after
attempted military
mutiny attack
Military sources said six people
were killed when a group of Guin-
ean soldiers attempted to seize
control of a military airbase near
the capital, Bissau.
The fighting went on for about
two hours early Sunday before the
mutineers were defeated by mili-
tary loyal to the Chief of General
Staff of the Armed Forces, Antonio
Indjai, said an army officer who
spoke at the military headquarters
on condition of anonymity. There
is no indication if any senior offi-
cers were involved in the uprising.
The apparent attempted coup
was against the military junta that
itself seized power in April.
No leader in nearly 40 years
of independence has finished his
time in office in Guinea-Bissau, a
former Portuguese colony on Afri-
ca's western coast that has long
been plagued by coups.
-Compiled from
Daily wire reports

Wisc. man shoots
seven, kills three

Syrian men hose down damaged cars at the site after a car bomb attack in Bab Touma neighborhood, a popular shopping
district largely inhabited by Syria's Christian minority in Damascus, Syria, Sunday, Oct. 21, 2012.
Bomb-riged taxi leaves 13
dead, 29 wounded in Syria

Shooter terrorized
mall spa after
slashing wife's tires
BROOKFIELD, Wis. (AP) - A
Wisconsin man who had been
accused of domestic violence
and slashing his wife's tires took
a gun into the spa where she
worked Sunday and shot seven
women, three fatally, before kill-
ing himself, a police chief said.
The shootings set off a con-
fusing, six-hour search for the
gunman that locked down a
nearby mall, a country club
adjacent to the spa and the hos-
pital where the survivors were
taken. The search froze activity
in a commercial area in Brook-
field, a middle-to-upper class
community west of Milwaukee,
for much of the day. Ultimately,
he was found dead in the spa.
Authorities said it would take
time to sort out exactly what
happened, and emphasized they
were still interviewing witness-
es and rescuers and did not have
a firm timeline of events. At a
news conference Sunday night,
Mayor Steve Ponto called the
shootings "a senseless act on
the part of one person."
The chaos started around
11 a.m. at the Azana Day Spa, a
two-story, 9,000-square-foot
building across from a major
shopping mall. The first officers
on the scene found the build-
ing filled with smoke from a fire

authorities believe was set by
the suspect, Radcliffe Franklin
Haughton, 45, of Brown Deer,
Brookfield Police Chief Dan
Tushaus said.
They also found a 1-pound
propane tank they initially
thought might be an improvised
explosive device, Tushhaus
said. That slowed the search of
the building as law enforcement
agents waited for a bomb squad
to clear the scene.
Tushaus said later that police
didn't know whether the gun-
man broughtthe propane tank to
the spa or it was leftby a contrac-
tor.
The search also was com-
plicated by the layout of the
building, with numerous small
treatment rooms and several
locked areas, Tushaus said.
While officers initially thought
the gunman had fled the build-
ing, they later found his body in
one of the locked areas, he said.
The bodies of the victims
were also found in the spa.
Tushaus said investigators were
still working to identify them.
He said the four survivors were
between the ages of 22 and 40.
He didn't know if they were
employees at the spa or custom-
ers, and it wasn't clear if the
man's wife was among the vic-
tims.
Haughton had recently been
arrested after witnesses iden-
tified him as the person who
slashed his wife's tires, police
said.

Le
dis
AM
taxi p
up nee
ian ca
ple as
endin
pushe
in tal
Assad
Th
ed 29
pingc
oversl
Syria
Leban
Hu
protes
govern
capita
the F]
Leban
accusi
far tot
For m
Leban

banese violence military and political domina-
tion.
stracts from car In Syria, two government offi-
cials speaking from the scene of
bomb attack the blast said the taxi exploded
50 meters (yards) from the main
OMAN, Jordan (AP) - A police station in Bab Touma, a
acked with explosives blew neighborhood in Damascus' Old
ar a police station in the Syr- City. They insisted on anonymity
pital Sunday, killing13 peo- because they were not allowed to
the U.N. envoy tasked with brief the media.
g the country's civil war An Associated Press reporter
d his call for a cease-fire at the site said blood stained the
ks with President Bashar street and sidewalks, shards of
1. glass littered the pavement from
e blast, which also wound- shattered shop windows, and the
people in the popular shop- charred hulks of at least four cars
district of Bab Touma, was littered the street.
hadowed however by anti- State news agency SANA put
violence in neighboring the death toll at 13, while the
non. anti-regime Syrian Observatory
ndreds of angry Lebanese for Human Rights said at least 10
sters tried to storm the people were killed.
nment headquarters in the Bab Touma is mainly inhabited
l, Beirut, blaming Syria for by Syria's Christian minority.
riday assassination of a top Damascus has been a frequent
tese intelligence official and target of bombings in recent
ing the government of being months, although it was once
o close to the Assad regime. largely immune to the violence
such of the past 30 years, spreading across the country
on has lived under Syrian since the anti-Assad revolt began

in March 2011.
There was no immediate claim
of responsibility for Sunday's
blast, but Islamist groups fight-
ing alongside the rebels have in
the past said they target security
installations in the capital.
In another part of the city,
U.N. and Arab League envoy
Lakhdar Brahimi met with
Assad to push for a cease-fire
between rebels and government
forces for the four-day Muslim
holiday of Eid al-Adha, which
begins Oct. 26.
Brahimi said that he met earli-
er with Syrian opposition groups
inside and outside the country to
discuss his truce plan. He said
he received "promises" but "not
a commitment" from them to
honor the cease-fire.
Syrian authorities blame the
anti-government uprising on a
foreign conspiracy and accuse
Saudi Arabia and Qatar, along
with the U.S, other Western
countries and Turkey, of funding,
training and arming the rebels,
whom they describe as "terror-
ists."

Uruguayan govt
legalizes abortion,
plans to sell pot

George McGovern dead at 90;
lost 1972 presidential election

Two dead, three with Eagleton in 2005. Noting
that Nixon and his runningmate,
injured after fatal Spiro Agnew, would both ulti-
mately resign, he joked, "If we
rampage had run in '74 instead of '72, it
would have been a piece of cake."
SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) - A proud liberal who had
George McGovern once joked argued fervently against the
that he had wanted to run for Vietnam War as a Democratic
president inthe worst way - and senator from South Dakota and
that he had done so. three-time candidate for presi-
It was a campaign in 1972 dis- dent, McGovern died at 5:15 a.m.
honored by Watergate, a scan- Sunday at a Sioux Falls hospice,
dal that fully unfurled too late family spokesman Steve Hildeb-
to knock Republican President rand told The Associated Press.
Richard M. Nixon from his place McGovern was 90.
as a commanding favorite for re- McGovern's family had said
election. The South Dakota sena- late last week that McGovern
nor tried to make an issue out of had become unresponsive while
the bungled attempt to wiretap in hospice care, and Hildebrand
the offices of the Democratic said he was surrounded by fam-
National Committee, calling ily and lifelong friends when he
Nixon the most corrupt presi- died.
dent in history. "We are blessed to know that
But the Democrat could not our father lived a long, successful
escape the embarrassing mis- and productive life advocating for
steps of his own campaign. The the hungry, being a progressive
most torturous was the selec-
tion of Missouri Sen. Thomas F.
Eagleton as the vice presidential
nominee and, 18 days later, fol-
lowingthe disclosure that Eagle-
ton had undergone electroshock
therapy for depression, the deci-
sion to drop him from the ticket
despite having pledged to back
him "1,000 percent."
It was at once the most memo-
rable and the most damaging
line of his campaign, and called
"possibly the most single dam-
aging faux pas ever made by a
presidential candidate" by the
late political writer Theodore H.
White.
After a hard day's campaign-
ing - Nixon did virtually none
- McGovern would complain to
those around him that nobody
was paying attention. With R.
Sargent Shriver as his running RKinance
mate, he went on to carry only
Massachusetts and the Dis-
trict of Columbia, winning just
38 percent of the popular vote
in one of the biggest losses in
American presidential history.
"Tom and I ran into a little
snag back in 1972 that in the light
of my much advanced wisdom i n M
ated," Z001/6%Annual Percenage Rate(AR applie
today, I think was vastly exagger-
ated," McGovern said at an event

voice for millions and fighting
for peace. He continued giving
speeches, writing and advising
all the way up to and past his 90th
birthday, which he celebrated
this summer," the family said in
the statement.
A public viewing is planned
Thursday at First United Meth-
odist Church in Sioux Falls.
Funeral services will be Friday
at Mary Sommervold Hall at the
Washington Pavilion of Arts and
Science in Sioux Falls.
A decorated World War II
bomber pilot, McGovern said he
learned to hate war by waging
it. In his disastrous race against
Nixon, he promised to end the
Vietnam War and cut defense
spending by billions of dollars.
He helped create the Food for
Peace program and spent much
of his career believing the Unit-
ed States should be more accom-
modating to the former Soviet
Union.

Citizens act out
against far-left
government's plans
MONTEVIDEO, Uruguay
(AP) - Uruguayans used to call
their country the Switzerland
of Latin America, but its faded
grey capital seems a bit more
like Amsterdam now that its
congress has legalized abortion
and is drawing up plans to sell
government-grown marijuana.
Both measures would be
unthinkable in many other
countries. Cuba is the only
other nation in the region that
makes first-trimester abortions
accessible to all women, and no
country in the world produces
and sells pot for drug users to
enjoy.
But President Jose "Pepe"
Mujica, a flower-farming for-
mer leftist guerrilla, vowed
to sign whatever bill congress
could settle on that can mini-
mize the 30,000 illegal abor-
tions his government says
Uruguayan women suffer annu-
ally.
And while lawmakers have
yet to debate pot sales, Mujica's
ruling Broad Front coalition

staked its ground in August by
openly declaring that the drug
war has failed. Smoking pot - if
not growing and selling it - is
already legal in Uruguay, and
supplyingthe weed is a $30 mil-
lion business, the government
said.
This is democracy "a la Uru-
guaya" - the Uruguayan way -
a phrase that reflects both the
pride and the unmet promises
of a society where finding com-
mon ground is a highly shared
value, in stark contrast to many
other countries where voters
are divided by us-and-them
politics.
Such outsized respect for
the democratic process has
enabled the country of 3.4 mil-
lion people wedged between
Argentina and Brazil to reach
consensus on many issues that
have stymied bigger and richer
nations, from reforming health
care to providing free univer-
sity educations, to setting ambi-
tious renewable energy goals.
By embracing compromises,
Uruguay has managed to hold
onto its middle class through
repeated economic crises, and
pass laws that have consistently
improved its citizens' quality of
life.

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