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October 17, 2012 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

Wednesday, October 17, 2012 - 5A

The Michigan Daily - michigandailycom Wednesday, October17, 2012 - 5A

the extreme measure of replacing
elected officials with an appoint-
ed manager from the governor's
office, there should be objective
criteria ... rather than subjective
criteria."
Irwin added that it is difficult
to predict voter support of such
a measure, stating that the aver-
age constituent typically doesn't
closely follow municipal finance.
Still, he noted there are many peo-
ple in districts with financial man-
agers who have expressed concern
about how public services will be
affected by the change.
In a video statement released
on Oct. 10, Lt. Governor Brian Cal-
ley called on voters to consider the
necessity of financial organization
in troubled municipalities.
"This is a tool that is in place
in order to give an early warning
indicator to provide for additional
help and security for schools and
cities that fall into financial dis-
tress." Calley said. "This is a criti-
cal part of the reinvention of the
state of Michigan."
In a panel discussion at the Uni-
versity last year, Howard Ryan,
the director of legislative affairs
in the Michigan Department of
Treasury, said though munici-
palities oppose having Lansing-
appointed officials, dire financial
situations within certain districts
have made it necessary.
"(The) provisions (are) there to
allow flexibility for local units of
government," Ryan said lastyear.
LSA senior Rachel Jankowski,
chair of the University's chapter
of College Republicans, said the
group does not have an official
stance on Public Act 4 given the
fact that it isn't a decisively parti-
san issue.
However, speaking personally,
she said she understands Snyder's
push for intervention when situa-
tions are dismal.
"If there's a failing institution
we need someone to come in and
kind of revamp it," Jankowski
said.
The University's chapter
of College Democrats did not
return requests for comment as
of Tuesday afternoon.

MISCONDUCT
From Page 1A
Fitzgerald said the University
could propagate an investigation
regardless.
. The Department of Educa-
tion also suggested universities
use the "preponderance of the
evidence" standard to evaluate
the situation rather than the
"clear and convincing evidence"
standard. Under the preponder-
ance standard, less evidence is
required to validate an accusa-
tion than under the clear and
convincing standard.
These changes were first
REGENTS
From Page 1A
program. The existing struc-
ture would be demolished and
replaced with a 10,000 square-
foot facility with modernized
equipment.
"The proposed 10,000-gross-
square-foot Softball Center will
include locker rooms for play-
ers and coaches, staff offices,
a team meeting room, athletic
medicine and fitness spaces,
and support space," Brandon
and Slottow wrote.
No start or completion date
was included in the communi-
cation.
REGENTS TO CONSIDER
POWER CENTER
RENOVATIONS
The regents will also consid-
er upgrades to the University's
Power Center for the Perform-
ing Arts. According to a com-
munication, the $2-million
proposed upgrade will focus
solely on upgrades to the build-
ing's original 1971 electrical
system.
"This project will upgrade
the substation and a number of
electrical motor control cen-
ters, switchboards, and recep-
tacle and lighting panels to
meet current code and safety
requirements," Slottow wrote.
The project will also be bud-
geted to include upgrades to the
adjacent Fletcher Street Park-
ing Structure. If the regents
approve the motion, Slottow
estimated that the project
would be completed by winter
of 2014.
HONORARY DEGREE
RECIPIENTS TO BE
APPROVED
Following Monday's
announcement of the winter
2012 commencement speakers,

introduced into the interim pol-
icy cases the University institut-
ed in August 2011. The interim
policy was intended to pave the
way for a permanent system that
deters such behaviors and pro-
motes the safety of all students.
Fitzgerald says the draft process
is, for the most part, "consistent
with the interim process."
Fitzgerald added that nei-
ther the interim nor the new
policy will have any impact on
criminal investigations into
sexual misconduct.
The team of officials aims to
keep the University community
involved in the process. The
project's facilitator, Jennifer
the regents will also consider
awarding honorary degrees to
the speakers and other distin-
guished individuals.
Raynard Kington, the presi-
dent of Grinnell College and the
keynote speaker, will be con-
sidered for an honorary Doc-
tor of Laws. Kington received
his undergraduate degree and
M.D..from the University, and
completed an MBA and Ph.D.
with a concentration in health
policy and economics at the
Wharton School of Business at
the University of Pennsylvania,
respectively. In 2003, he was
appointed as a deputy direc-
tor at the National Institutes
of Health and briefly served
as the agency's acting direc-
tor from 2008-2009. In 2010,
he assumed the presidency of
Grinnell College in Iowa.
Michael Boyd - the former
artistic director of the Royal
Shakespeare Company, who
has maintained a long relation-
ship with the University - will
be considered for a Doctor of
Humane Letters. Boyd and
English Prof. Ralph Williams
have previously coordinated the
Royal Shakespeare Company's
creative residence at the Uni-
versity of Michigan. The Royal
Shakespeare Company's past
endeavors have included full
performances at the University,
and more recently, workshops to
demonstrate the development of
a major production.
Dee Dee Bridgewater - a
singer-songwriter who has won
numerous awards, including a
Tony Award and three Grammy
Awards -'is nominated for a
Doctor of Fine Arts honorary
degree.
Molly Dobson, a community
service volunteer and Univer-
sity alum, is nominated for a
Doctor of Laws. Her philan-
thropy work has been based
in Ann Arbor and in 2007 she
won the Community Founda-
tion Award from the Council of

Meyer Schrage, said in a press
release that input from the
community is paramount.
"All through this review our
goal has been to engage a large
part of the University com-
munity to get the best think-
ing possible on this important
topic," Schrage said. "This is
the next step in that process."
There will be two three-
hour sessions for students and
two additional sessions for fac-
ulty and staff to raise questions
about the policy, according to
Schrage. The first session will
take place on Wednesday at 5
p.m. in the Northwood Com-
munity Center.
Michigan Foundations.
Joschka Fischer, a German
Green party politician and the
German foreign minister from
1998-2005, will be considered
for a Doctor of Laws for his
political work. He previously
taught at the University.
Cornelia Kennedy is the first
woman to serve a chief judge
of a U.S. district court, and is
nominated for a Doctor of Laws
for her work in the 6th circuit
U.S. Court of Appeals.
REGENTS TO
AUTHORIZE ALCOHOL
FOR WINTER CLASSIC
The regents' agenda will
also include the authorization
of University officials to seek
a temporary liquor license for
the National Hockey League's
Winter Classic. The Winter
Classic is the NHL's flagship
outdoor game, and is planned
for Jan. 1, 2013 at Michigan
Stadium. This year's matchup
will pit the Detroit Red Wings
against the Toronto Maple
Leafs. Michigan's hosting of
the Winter Classic will depend
upon the resolution of the NHL
lockout, which has resulted in
the cancellation of regularly
scheduled games.
Due to a change to the Mich-
igan Liquor Control Code, the
regents must now directly issue
temporary liquor licenses for
special events at Michigan Sta-
dium, Slottow wrote in a com-
munication to the regents.
"Under the Michigan Liquor
Control Code, the Board of
Regents must provide local
government approval for the
concessionaire's application
for the liquor license," Slottow
wrote.
According to Slottow's com-
munication, Sodexo Manage-
ment Inc. will provide catering
and beverage services at the
event, pending regental approv-
al.

month by the Center for Local,
State and Urban Policy at the Ford
School of Public Policy found that
38 percent of local leaders sup-
port the law, 30 percent are in
opposition, 21 percent are indif-
ferent and 11 percent are unde-
cided.
State Rep. Jeff Irwin (D-Ann
Arbor) said the 2011 expansion of
UAW
From Page 1A
Motors, an exchange that drew
perhaps the sharpest reaction
from the pro-Obama crowd here.
After Qbama said Romney
would have let the automakers go
bankrupt - which elicited taunts
against Romney from the crowd
- the Republican presidential
nominee responded that Obama
did in fact let the automakers go
bankrupt.
As Obama responded that
Romney would have let Detroit go
bankrupt without a way for them
to survive, loud cheers rang out
from the crowd.
The state of the economy was
also a major focus of the disagree-
ments between the candidates,
with the contenders again offer-
ing distinct visions of the "job
market. When a student began
the town hall-style debate by ask-
ing how the candidates would
improve the job prospects of col-
lege graduates, Obama described
a growing economy, while Rom-
ney reiterated that the "middle
class has been crushed in the last
four years."
"The policies he's put in place ...
have not let this economy take off
and grow like it could have," Rom-
OHIO
From Page 1A
LSA sophomore Jacob Light,
the press chair for the College
Democrats, said the club chose to
canvass in Ohio because it is the
site of some of the country's clos-
est races.
"(The congressional election) is
now one of the most heated races
in the nation and we want to show
some support and show that even
though it's a different state, the
issues that people are facing in
that race are issues that we're fac-
ing all over the nation," Light said.
Light said the College Demo-
crats contacted 3,000 Ohio vot-
ers via door-to-door canvassing
or phone calls, adding that some
voters responded positively to the
solicitations for Sutton and Obama
andexpressed appreciation for the
efforts of the students.
"Ohio residents really respond-
ed to the fact that we came from
such a great distance to support
issues that transcend state bor-
ders," Light said.
Light added that Michigan

the previously existing emergen-
cy financial manager law gave
a dangerous amount of power
to unelected officials while not
setting enough criteria for their
appointment.
"The Legislature went too far
when they amended the emer-
gency manager law last year,"
Irwin said. "If we're going to take

ney said. "The presidenthas tried,
but his policies haven't worked."
In an interview after the
debate, Dingell praised Obama's
aggressiveness in challenging
Romney.
"He was more direct in dealing
with Romney, which I thought
was not only good, but wise and
necessary and effective," Dingell
said.
Rory Gamble, the UAW Region
IA director, said Obama coun-
tered his sub-par performance in
the first presidential debate with a
strong rebuff of Romney Tuesday
night.
"He was a lot more force-
ful, and more factual and right-
to-the-point - he showed the
aggressiveness that we need in a
president," Gamble said. "I think
tonight we saw the real President
Obama."
Aaron Kall, the director of the
University's debate program, said
in a telephone interview that the
format of the face-off, Obama's
aggressiveness and the frequent
appearance of social issues that
favor Obama all added up to a win-
ning night for the president.
Still, Kall said that Obama's
concern should not be if he won
the debate, but whether his per-
formance will be enough to con-
vince independent voters to vote
State University's chapter of Col-
lege Democrats will travel to Ann
Arbor on Friday to help campaign
for Michigan House of Repre-
sentatives candidate Gretchen
Driskell.
LSA senior Yonah Lieberman
said the campaigners were wel-
comed as a fresh alternative to the
barrage of advertisements that
have been infiltrating the state.
"People (in Akron), more than
anywhere that we canvass, are
really sick of hearing ads," Lieber-
man, who is also a Michigan Daily
columnist, said. "Which makes us
coming to see them face-to-face
about issues that are relevant to
them all the more important."
Lieberman said decided and
undecided voters engaged the
students in discussions about the
issues within Sutton and Obama's
campaigns.
He added that he was satisfied
with his decision to canvass over
the break instead of spend his time
relaxing or studying.
"There are a lot of things I could
have done over fall break," Lieber-
man said. "But I'm really glad that
I went to Ohio and knocked on

for him after a swing in the polls
following his dismal first debate
performance.
"Therealquestionofthis-debate
is ... whether undecided voters in.
critical swing areas are going to be
affected by this," Kall said.
However, LSA senior Jared
Boot, the chair of the University's
chapter of Students for Romney,
said he thought Romney carried
the night, though the public might
beg to differ.
He said Romney maintained
his assertiveness while besting
Obama on questions involving
higher education, and inquiring
the candidates' stances on how
the killingoftheAmerican ambas-
sador to Libya reflected upon U.S.
foreign policy.
"Speaking as the voice of mod-
eration that's going to unite the
country is what he did the best,"
Boot said.
Boot referred to polls that
reveal Romney narrowing the
gap with Obama in critical swing
states, including Michigan, and
speculated that Romney would
hold his position in polls after the
debate.
"The first debate, Romney had
a decisive victory that changed
the map," he said. "This debate
was probably a draw ... although I
thought Romney did better."
doors for Congresswoman Sutton
and President Obama ... I think
that it will be a huge boost (to their
campaigns).

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