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September 20, 2012 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2012-09-20

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Ann Arbor, Michigan

Thursday, September 20, 2012

michigandaily.com
CENTRAL STUDENT GOVERNMENT
CSJ: College
GOP chair
can keep job

SAMANiHARGI/Daily
Members of the Medical School community hold a vigil in Rackham Auditorium in honor of families whose loved ones made the decision to donate their bodies
to science on Wednesday.
STATE BUDGET
'U' gets bonus state funding
$1.1 million more lion in additional state funding, smaller the increase in tuition Central Michigan University
the third highest of the state's from the previous academic received the highest amount
allocated for 15 public universities. year, the larger the funding of state funding, accruing $1.8
Each of Michigan's public allocation becomes. million for raising tuition by 2
keeping tuition universities received funding Earlier this month in a percent, the smallest margin of
for preventing tuition increases memorandum released by the the 15 schools. Ferris State Uni-
costs in check as part of Republican Gov. Rick State House Fiscal Agency - a versity came in second at $1.3
Snyder's restructured higher nonpartisan group that pro- million, a Detroit Free Press
By SAM GRINGLAS education budget formula. The vides fiscal advice to the state article reported.
For the Daily policy rewards public univer- House - explained how the According to University
sities that adhere to perfor- breakdown of the $9.1 million spokesman Rick Fitzgerald, the
By limiting the amount it mance standards and tuition set aside by the state for the funding was not unexpected. In
increased tuition, the Univer- restraints that keep annual tuition restraint funding would order to keep tuition increases
sity is being rewarded $1.1 mil- increases below 4 percent. The be rewarded. See FUNDING, Page 5A

Dean of students
still must approve
judiciary's ruling
By GIACOMO BOLOGNA and
ANDREW SCHULMAN
Daily StaffReporters
More than five months after
impeachment charges were
filed, the Central Student Judi-
ciary decided on the fate of the
leadership of the University's
chapter of College Republicans
early Wednesday morning. How-
ever, the decision is still pending
review by the University's Dean
of Students as the organization's
internal struggle.continues.
In a document obtained by
The Michigan Daily, the CSJ
decision explained that the chair
and the executive board made
some convincing arguments,
while others fell short. Eventu-
ally, CSJ ruled that the executive
board did not have the grounds
to impeach its chair, LSA senior
Rachel Jankowski. However, it
found credence in the executive
board's argument that Jankows-
ki did not give sufficient notice
to the group's membership when
she instituted constitutional
changes that made it more diffi-
cult to impeach her.
Maintaining Jankowski as

chair and invalidating the con-
stitutional changes she made
allows her to make alterations
again in the future as long as
she gives ample notice, and also
allows the executive board to file
for impeachment again as long
as they have sufficient proof that
she violated the bounds of her
position.
"In many ways, the College
Republicans' board has received
real-life lessons in the machi-
nations of politics and the con-
sequences of constitutional
brinksmanship," the decision
read. "We hope they will consid-
er that a lesson learned and use it
to further the organization and
principles they purport to repre-
sent."
In a written statement to The
Michigan Daily, Jankowski cel-
ebrated CSJ's decision, reiterat-
ing that the executive board's
accusations against her were
"baseless" and that its attempted
impeachment of her was "noth-
ing short of a petty attempt to
score cheap political points."
"Whether the board was
attempting to settle some politi-
cal or personal vendetta against
me, or whether they had ulterior
motives for attempting to remove
me from power, CSJ made the
correct recommendation in rein-
stating me as chair and deter-
See CSJ, Page SA

ELECTION 2012
Economy, jobs
focus for young
Republicans

BLUE BIKES

Social issues less
important than
fiscal matters
By CHANNING ROBINSON
Daily Staff Reporter
While some young conserva-
tives disagree with the Republi-
can Party's stance on marriage
equality and abortion rights,
students identifying with the
GOP said they are more focused
on voting for the'candidate they
think is best suited to stabilize
the economy.
Members of the University's
chapter of College Republicans
said while- many college-aged
Republicans may not share the
same social values as Rom-
ney, his platform - focused on
reducing taxes, government
programs, spending and regu-
lation, while increasing trade,
energy production and labor
market flexibility - is critical to
fostering a stronger nation.
LSA senior Jared Boot, the
chair of Students for Romney at
the University and a member of
* College Republicans, said stu-

dents should make the economy
a priority in choosing a candi-
date to vote for in November.
"In this election cycle, the
economic crisis should be the
thing that students are voting
on - it's what I'm voting on,"
Boot said.
Boot recently spoke out in
support of gay students sup-
porting the GOP during the first
appearance
of the College
Republicans 1
at Gayz Craze
on Sept. 2, an 111111
annual event
held at the
beginning of the year by the
LGBT Issues Commission of
Central Student Government.
"I've had people come up to
me on campus and say, 'I'm fis-
cally conservative and I lean
toward being a hawk on foreign
policy issues, but I'm gay,"' Boot
said earlier in the month. "For
me, that's really discouraging
that people would be turned
away because of that."
LSA senior Rachel Jankowski,
the chair of the College Repub-
licans, echoed Boot's sentiments
See REPUBLICANS, Page SA

AUSTEN HUFFORD/Daily
Brad Stark, manager of the Blue Bike rental program demonstrates how to use the bike on Wednesday.
UNIVERSITY RESEARCH
Study shows disparities in counseling

ACADEMIC FUNDING
Nursing
program
gets $1.5m
grant
Program
aims to assist
underrepresented
students
By LIANA ROSENBLOOM
Daily StaffReporter
Prospective University nurs-
ingstudentsfromdisadvantaged
backgrounds will continue to
receive guidance and support
through Gaining Excellence in
Nursing Education: Strength in
the Sciences, a School of Nurs-
ing program that was recently
granted $L5 million from the
U.S. Department of Health and
Human Services over a three-
year period to continue award-
ing scholarships and mentoring
students.
Nursing Prof. Patricia Cole-
man-Burns, the director of
GENESIS, said the program
focuses on preparing high
school students for the Univer-
sity's nursing curriculums and
providing financial support and
See NURSING, Page 5A

Parents of sickle
cell patients get
less guidance
By RENUKA
SANTHANAGOPALAN
For theDaily
University researchers pub-
lished a study this month illus-
trating their findings on the
disparity between counseling
received by parents with new-
borns that had the sickle cell

trait, agene thatcan cause sickle
cell anemia, and newborns who
were carriers of cystic fibrosis.
The study, published in the
Journal of Genetic Counseling,
foundthat20 percentofparents
with newborns carrying the
sickle cell trait did not receive
genetic counseling, while only
8 percent of parents with new-
borns carrying the cystic fibro-
sis gene lacked counseling.
Sickle cell anemia and cys-
tic fibrosis are two recessive
genetic disorders, the former
common in African Americans

and the latter in Caucasians.
Kathryn Moseley, an assis-
tant professor of Pediatrics
and Communicable Diseases
at the Medical School and a
researcher who conducted the
study, said there are no medical
problems associated with car-
rying the cystic fibrosis gene,
while carriers of the sickle cell
trait have risks that must be
addressed, such as the possi-
bility of heart stroke or muscle
breakdown.
"In certain environmental
See COUNSELING, Page SA

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