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September 17, 2012 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2012-09-17

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1 e 1117tc4igan4,.3at 1! j

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Monday, September 17, 2012

michigandailycom

CITY GOVERNMENT
Millage
may fund
new forms
of local art

ERIN KIRKLA ND/Daily
Senior quarterback Denard Robinson greets a Minuteman tight end after Michigan completed its 63-13 rout of Massachusetts on Saturday.
Bihg score doesn't mean much

Proposal would
provide money to
peformance art
programs
By TAYLOR WIZNER
Daily StaffReporter
Every April Fool's Day, giant
papier-mache puppets parade
down Main Street as part of Fes-
tifools, the annual festival that
unites University artists and
Ann Arbor residents. Though
the program currently receives
support from a number of small
donors, it may be eligible for city
funding if a new arts millage
passes this fall.
The public art millage on the
ballot for November aims to
restructure the funding model for
public art in Ann Arbor. Public art
administrator Aaron Seagraves
said if the millage is passed, it
would eliminate strict restric-
tions and open funding to tempo-
rary work and performance art,
including Festifools.
The millage would also take
the place of Percent for Art, the

current program that yields 1
percent of city-sponsored con-
struction project funding into a
permanent art display.
Seagraves said Percent for Art
requires public art installations to
be constructed on all citygovern-
ment developments in relation to
the purpose of the department.
"Because the Percent for Art
program was attached to those
specific projects, those projects
have particular funding sources,"
Seagraves said. "So, in turn, the
public art project that develops
from the funding has to relate
to the purpose of the funding
source, so it's kind of a complex
scheme."
For example, the water-
themed sculpture in front of Ann
Arbor's Municipal Center was
funded by the Water andSewage
Department, Seagraves said.
Rather than taking funding
from specific departments, Sea-
graves said the newly-proposed
funding will come directly from
a tax that would last three years,
bringing in $459,273 each year
and costing households about
$11 annually.
Mark Tucker - the Lloyd Hall
See MILLAGE, Page 8A

enard Robinson looked
across the field, scan-
ning the sea of maroon
and white jerseys heading up
the Michigan Stadium tunnel.
Robinson took off on a jog. He
had somebody to track down.
Robinson caught up to
Michael Cox, the starting Mas-
sachusetts running back, at the
30-yard line and they greeted
each other like brothers; their
elaborate handshake included
a few windmill gestures and
ended with a bear hug. Roy
Roundtree followed right
behind, a grin splashed across

his face as he hugged Cox - his
classmate and teammate for
four years at Michigan.
The final
seconds_
had just
ticked off
the clock,
closing
Michigan's.
convincing
63-13 rout
of Massa- STEPHEN J.
chusetts on NESBITT
Saturday.
Robinson and Roundtree
finally parted ways with Cox

and raced to the north end
zone to sing "The Victors" with
the student section.
Cox turned the other way,
smiling all the while. None of
his teammates were left on the
field. He shook hands with a
pair of Michigan coaches, the
ones that were on his sideline
just nine months ago, and
started up the tunnel.
Everything was off-kilter for
Cox. He felt like he'd taken a
wrong turn or two in his final
visit to the Big House. He was
in the wrong locker room, on
the wrong sideline and on the

wrong end of a blowout.
But as he took his first step
up the runway, maize-clad fans
reached down for a high-five.
Maybe they remembered him,
maybe'not. Codxobliged; slap-
ping hands as the darkness of
the tunnel quickly enveloped
him for the final time in his
career.
Just like that, the man
whose return to Ann Arbor
made something of a game that
meant absolutely nothing was
gone.
And by nothing, I'm serious.
See SCORE, Page 7A

CENTRAL STUDENT GOVERNMENT
President of
CSG speaks out
against RSG's
secession plans

Parikh says divided
government is
threat to student
unity
By GIACOMO BOLOGNA
Daily StaffReporter
After Rackham Student Gov-
ernment proposed seceding
from Central Student Govern-
ment last week - a move that
could result in the loss of more
than $200,000 in annual rev-
enue for the organization -
CSG members are speaking out
against the potential schism.
Manish Parikh, CSG presi-
dent and Business senior, said
CSG serves as one of few student
organizations that represents
both graduates and undergrad-
uates, and is an important rela-
tionship to maintain.
"It has been this way for a
reason, and it will be this way

for a reason," Parikh said.
He continued, arguing that
separate student governments
bodies would lessen the power
of the student.
"When our voice is together,
we have one singular unified
powerful voice," Parikh said.
"But if we split up into separate
factions ... our voice becomes
divided."
But RSG presidenthMichael
Benson has argued that CSG
and RSG have different inter-
ests and priorities.
According to Benson's pre-
liminary plan, the secession
would increase funding to the
student governments of the
individual schools and colleges,
and would fund a new unilat-
eral graduate student govern-
ment.
CSG would no longer collect
the $7.19 fee from every gradu-
ate student each semester, but
a similar fee would be split
between a graduate student's
See CSG, Page 8A

V TRANSPORTATION
Three new
hybrid
buses join
fleet
'U' meets goal
for sustainable
transportation
practices
By MICHAEL MASS
For the Daily
With the addition ofthree new
hybrid buses to the campus bus
fleet, the University has reached
its goal for sustainable transpor-
tation.
The recent implementation
brings the total of hybrid buses
to seven - joining the four added
last year - meeting University
President Mary Sue Coleman's
goal announced in her sustain-
ability pledge last September.
Keith Johnson, the Univer-
sity's associate director of trans-
portation operations, said the
money for the three buses, as
well as further bus purchases, is
derived from the general fund of
the University budget. He noted
there has also been a cost-shar-
ing program with the Univer-
sity of Michigan Health System,
See HYBRID BUSES, Page 7A

Member of the Ann Arbor Gamelan Ensemble perform in the Nichols Arboretum on Sunday.
Tim Hortons, men's shop
among new A businesses

Stores add to cise culinary prowess and a
fashion-forward attitude. Now,
established with four new businesses in the
mix, residents will get a taste of
markets in city what they've been missing.

Jimmy Curtiss, a manager at
Elixir Vitae Coffee and Tea
on Maynard St., the coffee
shop formerly known as Caf6
Ambrosia. Curtiss said Ann
Arbor residents's sophisticated
taste in coffee is one of reasons
the shop's owners are opening
a second location at 117 E. Lib-
erty St.
"I wouldn't say that we're
See BUSINESSES, Page 7A

By ALICIA ADAMCZYK
Daily StaffReporter
In a city brimming with
restaurants, coffee shops and
boutiques, it's hard not to exer-

ELIXIR VITAE COFFEE
AND TEA JOINS E.
LIBERTY ST.
Ann Arbor citizens know
good coffee, according to

WEATHER HI: 62 GOT A NEWS TIP? NEW ON MICHIGANOAILY.COM
TM RO __ 40 Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail A first take on 'Cruel Summer'
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INDEX NEWS ......................
Vol. CXXII, No.10 AP NEWS................
02012TheMichiganDaily OPINION-..............
michigandoilccom

..2A ARTS... ..........A
..3A CLASSIFIEDS...............6A
..4A SPORTSMONDAY.........1B

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