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September 13, 2012 - Image 2

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2A- Thursday, September 13, 2012

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

2A- Thursday, September13, 2012 The Michigan Daily - michigandailycom

420 Maynard St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1327
www.michigandaily.com
JOSEPH LICHTERMAN RACHEL GREINETZ
Editor in Chief Business Manager
734-418-4115 ext. 1252 734-418-4115 ext. 1241
lichterman@michigandaily.com rmgrein@michigandaily.com

SISTER SISTER
_ KY :-

Facebook for scholars

Which course are you teach-
ing this semester and what
kind of material does it cover?
This semester I'm teaching
"Introduction to Information."
This course is about the incred-
ible role that information plays
in our lives, from how we under-
stand society (to) the economy
and social relationships. Infor-
mation is pervasive, and we've
all become not just consumers
of information, but producers as
well. In the course of this class,
we look at things like human-
computer interaction, social
media in collective action, infor-
mation economics, intellectual
property policy, information
visualization and more.

How would you describe
your teaching style?
I think in a word, I'd describe
it as playful. I want the top-
ics I teach to be engaging and
relevant, and for the students
to think about the process by
which information is delivered
in the classroom, not just outside
of it.
What do you think about
the prevalence of social media
in today's culture?
It's my primary research
area, and I've published many
papers and given many talks on
the subject. My (thought) on the
subject is that there's an inter-
esting intersection between

social systems and the technical
systems that currently are medi-
ating them. Social media and
related technologies are reduc-
ing the cost of creating, sharing,
and consuming huge amounts of
information, and that's likely to
affect us as a species over time.
What do you enjoy doing in
your free time?
As my students can tell you,
I'm a huge nerd. I dig comic
books, video games, science fic-
tion in all formats and Dungeons
& Dragons. I also like lifting
weights and spending time with
my wife. We're expecting our
first kid soon!
- HALEYGLATTHORN
I HRT THINGS YOU
tjf31 P1m k'NOfW TCIP1AY

Newsronm
734-418-4115 op.I
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finante
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Rushees stand outside the Delta Delta Delta sorority
while they wait to go in on Wednesday evening.
CRIME NOTES
Time for the Missing
iPhone5 Mongoose

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES

WHERE: Shapiro Under-
graduate Library
WHEN: Tuesday at about
9:25 a.m.
WHAT: An iPhone was
taken from a study area on
the first floor, University
Police reported. There are
no suspects.
Sushi on the go
WHERE: University Hos-
pital
WHEN: Tuesday at about
2:25 p.m.
WHAT: A female subject
left the cafeteria without
paying for $12 worth of
sushi, University Police
reported. The suspect was
identified and a warrant
request has been issued by
Washtenaw County.

WHERE: Couzens Resi-
dence Hall
WHEN: Tuesday at about
9:40 a.m.
WHAT: A pink-purple
Mongoose bike was taken
from a bike rack sometime
in August, University Police
reported. There are no sus-
pects.
Bag on the run
WHERE: Baits II Resi-
dence Hall
WHEN: Tuesday at 4:30
p.m.
WHAT: A female student's
bag was taken from her
room between 6 a.m. Satur-
day and 6p.m. Sunday, Uni-
versity Police reported. Her
laptop is also missing.

MFarmers' Zell visiting
t t McDonald's plans to dis-
market writers series play calorie information
for each menu item at
WHAT: The courtyard WHAT: Award-winning 14,000 of its U.S. restaurants,
patio will be filled with poet Carrie Fountain will Reuters reported. Two years
fresh fruits and vegetables read her works and sign ago, Panera Bread Co. was
from local farms. books afterward. the first restaurant to post
WHO: University Unions WHO: University of Michi- calorie information on its
and Central Student Gov- gan Museum of Art
WSSN.'P--.I+nsAA menus.

EDITORIAL STAFF
Andrew Weiner Managing Editor anweiner@michigandaily.com
BethanylirnManagn e s Editor bihon@nhchigandailyecon
SEIOS EDITORS:HaeyGnlathHaleyGoldbergRayzGonl dsiy,
PASITANT EWSEDITORS: Giacomo Bologna, Anna Rozenberg, Andrew Schulman,
Petershahin K.C. Wassman
TimothyRabb and opinioneditors@michigandaily.com
AdrienneRoberts Editorial Page Editors
SENIOR EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS: Harsha Nahata,Vanessa Rychlinski
ASSISTANT EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS: Jesse Klein, Sarah Skaluba
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Leah Burgin ManagingArts Editor burgin@michigandaily.com
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BUSINESS STAFF
Ashley Karadsheh Associate Business Manager
Sean Jackson sales Manager
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Sean Jackson Special Projects Manager
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Meryl Hulteng National Account Manager
te MichinDlsytiS Ntt4-96t)is iublished ondaythrough Friday dring the fl ad
to all readers. Additionaltopies may be picked up at the Daily's office for $2. Subscriptions for
fal term, starting in September, via U.S. mail are $110. inter term(Januarythrough April) is
$ii, yearlong (September through April) is $195.University affiliates are subject to areduced
subscription rate.On-campussubscriptionsifor falterm ares3.Subscriptionsmustbeprepaid.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and The Associated Collegiate Press.

ernment
WHEN: Today from 11 a.m.
to 3 p.m.
WHERE: Michigan Union

WHEN: Tonight at 5:10
p.m.
WHERE: Helmut Stern
Auditorium

President's Jazzy jams

open house
WHAT: University Presi-
dent Mary Sue Coleman
invites students to a meet-
and-greet at her home.
Refreshments will be avail-
able.
WHO: Office of the Presi-
dent
WHEN: Today from 4 p.m.
to 5 p.m.
WHERE: 815 South Uni-
veresity Ave.

WHAT: Paul VornHagen
will sing and playa variety
of jazz classics on the saxo-
phone and flute.
WHO: Gifts of Art
WHEN: Today at noon
WHERE: University Hos-
pital
CORRECTIONS
* Please report any
error in the Daily to
corrections@michi-
gandaily.com.

Looking for some
fresh ideas on healthy,
sustainable eating?
Check out the second annual
MFarmers market, and don't
forget to bring cloth grocery
bags for the local produce.
y FOR MORE, SEETHE B-SIDE, INSIDE
A new business called
Rushbiddies offers pro-
fessional image con-
sulting services for women
rushing sororities, ABC
News reported. For $300 an
hour, customers can learn
what to wear, say and how to
act during rush.

MORE ONLINE Love Crime Notes? Share them with your
followers on Twitter @CrimeNotes or find them on their new blog.

0

LOVE TO WORK HARD, PLAY HARD?
COME TO A MASS MEETING TONIGHT @ 7:30 P.M.
JOIN THE DAILY STAFF AT 420 MAYNARD ST.

Nev. air race goes on one year
after deadly crash killed 11

Race adopted safety
czar, changes in
training pilots
RENO, Nev. (AP) - The vin-
tage World War II fighters roar-
ing out of the Valley of Speed
are as loud as ever, their colorful
paint jobs as bright as the enthu-
siasm of the loyal aviation buffs
who fill the grandstands in Reno.
But it's not exactly business as
usual at the 49th annual National
Championship Air Races, which
kick off this week. The element of
danger persists despite new safety
measures put in place after a P-51
Mustang took a deadly plunge
into spectators last year. Pilots
will still be flying souped-up
muscle planes wingtip to wingtip,
sometimes exceeding500 mph.
"We never thought this would
happen, but we know it's not
knitting," said Marilyn Dash, a
biplane pilot from the San Fran-
cisco Bay area. "It's not bowling.
"Nobody ever was killed bowl-
ing, were they?"

Race organizers adopted a half
dozen changes recommended by
theNational TransportationSafe-
ty Board following the crash last
September that killed 11 people,
including pilot Jimmy Leeward,
and injured more than 70 others.
A reminder of the danger
came Tuesday during qualifying
heats for the fastest planes when
the pilot of a vintage Hawker
Sea Fury was forced to make an
emergency landing. He escaped
uninjured after the hard landing
kicked up a cloud of dust visible
from the grandstands.
The qualifying heat resumed in
the unlimited class, where two-
time national champion Steve
Hinton Jr. posted the top speed of
493 mph earlier in the day.
But there are differences from
last year. The course is now more
than 1,000 feet from the grand-
stand, instead of 850; fuel trucks
are set away from the landing
strip; and the final turn of the race
is less sharp.
Some changes are more notice-
able than others. The impact cra-
ter from last year's crash on the

edge of the tarmac that has been
paved over with asphalt, and the
race officially changed its name
to "TravelNevada.com National
Championship Air Races and Air
Show presented by Breitling."
The new name is the result of a
one-time, $600,000 sponsorship
the state tourism commission
extended as necessary to keeping
the event alive in the face of soar-
ing insurance premiums.
Race organizers hope the
most significant changes will be
behind-the-scenes, in training
classes intended to better prepare
pilots for intense gravitational
pull and wake turbulence, and
along pit row, where mechanics
will be subject to a new inspection
process that requires follow-up
confirmation that ordered repairs
actually get done - a possible
contributor to Leeward's demise.
"It really seems about the
same," Eric Zine, a pilot from Van
Nuys, Calif. "There's increased
focus on safety. But we're doing
stuff people don't do. It's not nor-
mal to try to make a plane go fast-
er than it's designed to go."

Human stem cells restore hearing
in groundbreaking gerbil study

Scie
unco
NEW
the firs
improve
mals by
stem cel
for some
certain I
"It's
a signifi
one exr
work, D
the Univ
Francisc
TheE
uncomm

ntists treat an that affects fewer than 1 percent
torperhaps 15 percent of hearing-
mmon form of impaired people. And the treat-
ment wouldn't necessarily apply
deafness to all cases of that disorder. Sci-
entists hope the approach can
YORK (AP) - For be expanded to help with more
t time, scientists have common forms of deafness. But
d hearing in deaf ani- in any case, it will be years before
using human embryonic human patients might benefit.
lls, an encouraging step Results of the work, done in
day treating people with gerbils, were reported online
hearing disorders. Wednesday in the journal Nature
a dynamite study (and) by a team led by Dr. Marcelo Riv-
cant leap forward," said olta of the University of Sheffield
pert familiar with the in England.
fr. Lawrence Lustig of To make the gerbils deaf in one
versity of California, San ear, scientists killed nerve cells
o. that transmit information from
experiment involved an the ear to the brain. The experi-
son form of deafness, one ment was aimed at replacing

those cells.
Human embryonic stem cells
can be manipulated to produce
any type of cell. Using them is
controversial because they are
initially obtained by destroy-
ing embryos. Once recovered,
stem cells can be grown and
maintained in a lab and the
experiment used cells from lab
cultures.
The stem cells were used to
make immature nerve cells.
Those were then transplanted
into the deaf ears of 18 gerbils.
Ten weeks later, the rodents'
hearing ability had improved by
an average of 46 percent, with
recovery ranging from modest to
almost complete, the researchers
reported.

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