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April 12, 2012 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2012-04-12

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Ann Arbor, Michigan

Thursday, April 12, 2012

michigandaily.com

STATE LEGISLATURE
Immediate
effect policy
stirs debate
State Legislature effect 90 days after the final
adjournment of the legisla-
* divided on bill tive session, and a two-thirds
majority is necessary to pass
implementation legislation under immediate
du effect. Voting on the usage
of immediate effect has
typically been done using a
By KATIE BURKE rising vote, where those in
Daily StaffReporter favor show their support for
passage by standing, but the
To express growing frus- House also has the option of
tration with the methodol- using a recorded roll call vote
ogy of determining the use to catalogue each represen-
of immediate effect policy on tative's vote. Currently, the
state-level legislation, Demo- 110-member House is com-
crats in the Michigan House prised of 47 Democrats and
of Representatives recently 63 Republicans.
filed a lawsuit against the According to Rep. Jeff
state Speaker of the House, Irwin (D-Ann Arbor), 546
Jase Bolger (R-Marshall). of the 566 bills passed by
The suit, filed on March 27, the House this term have
questions the use of immedi- been passed under immedi-
ate effect in the state Legis- ate effect, including the bill
lature, a tactic introduced banning the unionization of
to the state constitution in graduate student research
1963 that activates laws as assistants and the state's
soon as they are signed into emergency financial man-
law, The policy has been ager law, which grants the
employed frequently by the state government the abil-
House since Republican Gov. ity to intervene by manag-
Rick Snyder took office in ing cities that are struggling
2011, and was used in previ- financially.
ous House terms by Repub- Irwin said, in reality, votes
licans and Democrats alike. are not fully counted in the
However, some Democrats rising vote, and, in many
claim the system has become cases, there is not a two-
increasingly abused. thirds majority in favor of
Under standard proce- the bill.
dure, a signed bill goes into See POLICY, Page 5A

MEN'S BASKETBALL
Coleman:
Banners
shouldn't
go back up

University can
reassociate with
'Fab Five' in 2013
By STEPHENJ. NESBITT
Daily SportsEditor
For the past decade, four
banners have lain dormant,
wrapped in plastic and placed
among the columns of card-
board boxes in the archives of
the Bentley Historical Library.
The banners represent one of
the pinnacles of the Michigan
men's basketball team's success.
Their resting place represents
the program's darkesthours.
And if the decision is left up
to University President Mary
Sue Coleman, that's where the
banners will remain.
"What happened was not
good, and I don't think they'll
ever go back up. I don't," Cole-
man said in her fireside chat
with students on Tuesday.
"Some day, I won't be presi-
dent anymore, and maybesome-
one else will have a different
view. But I think you have to

reflect on the larger meaning
and that we want to hold our-
selves to a higher standard."
On Nov. 7,2002,three months
into her presidency, Coleman
ordered the removal of four
banners representing two Final
Four appearances, a Big Ten
Tournament championship and
an NIT championship from the
rafters at Crisler Arena as part
of the University's self-imposed
sanctions following the biggest
scandal in the program's his-
tory.
"To me, taking down those
banners was like a dagger in my
heart," then-Athletic Director
Bill Martin told reporters that
afternoon.
The sanctions were in
response to an ongoing legal
case regarding former basket-
ball team booster Ed Martin,
who had admitted to running an
illegal gambling operation from
which he laundered money to
members of the Michigan bas-
ketball team.
The four indicted players
were headlined by legendary
"Fab Five" member Chris Web-
See BANNERS, Page 7A

MCKtNZIt BtRtZIN/Daily
Iota Phi Theta fraternity members perform in the National Pan-Hellenic Council's
annual Work it Out step show at Hill Auditorium yesterday.

ACADEMIC TOOLS
Students
to launch
note-share
program
* With 3,330 users,
Fetchnotes goes
live tomorrow
By KAITLIN WILLIAMS
Daily StaffReporter
With 3,300 users already,
Fetchnotes, a smartphone and
web application conceived by
Business juniors Alex Schiff and
Chase Lee, will go live to the pub-
lic tomorrow.
Fetchnotes, which is currently
in the beta stage, is an application
that compiles notes and memos
from smart phones and comput-
ers. The program organizes notes
using "@ tags" to make notes
easily identifiable and transfer-
rable, and will be accessible from
Androids and iPhones via mes-
saging programs.
Schiff, a former The Michigan
Daily columnist, and LSA junior
Alex Horak, Fetchnotes devel-
oper, are two members of the
Fetchnotes team - comprised of
14 University students studying
computer science and informat-
ics. The group has a space in the
University's TechArb student
See PROGRAM, Page SA

DICIN' IT UP

ELECTION 2012
Grad student
hopes to take
on Dingell
Marcin to focus have to answer to," Marcin
said. "It's not a monarchy."
on environment Marcm pointed to the
economy, climate change,
in Democratic federal tax code and same-
prmsex marriage as failings he
primary believes are critical for Ding-
ell to address in the August
By ANDREW SCHULMAN primary. He primarily criti-
DailyStaffReporter cized Dingell's performance
on envi-
For weeks last Decem- ron-
ber, Rackham student Dan- mental
iel Marcin browsed through issues,
newspapers and brooded over accus- 1
the deteriorating condition of ing the * ' f
the climate and increases in former
pollution. Then, one morning, chair of
he decided to do something the House Energy and Com-
about it. merce Committee of delay-
In March, Marcinlaunched ing bills with gas mileage
his campaign to unseat U.S. requirements in order to cod-
Rep. John Dingell (D-Mich.), dle the automakers.
who will seek to extend his "I had enough of reading
tenure as the longest-serving about Democrats who aren't
member in the House of Rep- going to take any action on
resentatives with a 30th term pollution or climate change or
this fall. If he gets on the bal- energy issues," Marcin said.
lot, Marcin will be Dingell's "John Dingell's one of them,
first primary challenger since and I want to take him down."
2002. Though Marcin is a can-
"I think it's been long didate for a doctorate in eco-
enough that he had a prima- nomics at the University,
ry challenger that he should See DINGELL, Page 5A

Chef Shih-Wen Wu prepares a meal for the Meishi-Chinese cooking series at the Mosher Jordan Residence Hall yesterday.
UNIVERSITY RESEARCH
Rare birds join museum collection

G

B3
Th
Newe
aquat
When
from

'U' acquires ian Island of Kaua'i for their first
flights, they face many man-
specimens for made obstacles that distract and
disorient them, causing them to
research crash into electric wires, build-
ings and trees.
y AUSTEN HUFFORD Though their lives ended per-
Daily StaffReporter manently, their bodies are now
being collected for research and
e lives of some newborn study by the University's Muse-
Il's Shearwaters, a type of um of Zoology.
ic bird, often end quickly. The Museumrecentlyreceived
they launch themselves a shipment of 15 rare Newell's
high cliffs on the Hawai- Shearwaters from the Hawaiian

division of the Fish and Wildlife
Service. The bodies were found
in 2004 by a member of the public
and brought to the wildlife ser-
vice where they were frozen for
preservation. Samples from the
University's recent acquisition
will also be sent to other institu-
tions for study, such as Michigan
State University and the Smith-
sonian Institute in Washington,
D.C., for study.
Zoology Prof. Diarmaid
See BIRDS, Page SA

WEATHER HI: 62
TOMORROW LO 47

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