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April 05, 2012 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2012-04-05

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DO N? MAIZE BLAZE
Reports indicate that Trey Burke will A look at the dense history of
avMichiganfrtheADraft Ann Arbor's Hash Bash culture.
PAGE 6A INSIDE
() EI \t LI X\L IN '\ \IS I 1)1frIL 1

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Thursday, April 5, 2012

michigandaily.com

UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATION KICK IT
'U' expenses
impacted by
compliance

Officials expect
to spend an
additional $1
million
By PETER SHAHIN
Daily StaffReporter
Various federal regulations
covering topics ranging from
privacy of academic records to
safety procedures for medical
experiments and faculty train-
ing, will continue to increase
University expenses in the next
year as additional regulations
are introduced.
According to Martha Pol-
lack,theUniversityviceprovost
for academic and budgetary
affairs, the University expects
to spend between $750,000
and $1 million more on compli-
ance than last year due to new
regulations from the National
Institutes of Health and other
government agencies in the
next fiscal year. The increase is
just the latest in a yearly cycle
of spending more to meet new
compliance standards.
According to a rough
estimate provided by the
University, the University cur-
rently spends between $22 mil-

lion and $24 million annually
on compliance issues - a figure
that does not include athlet-
ics or the University of Michi-
gan Health System, which are
funded separately.
"No one ever wants to spend
money on compliance," Pollack
said. "It's not an area where you
have to push us to be efficient.
We will naturally be as efficient
as we possibly can be."
Pollack said other new com-
pliance costa, such as augment-
ed infection control systems in
the Health Services Building,
were accreditation compliance
costs rather than research-
related costs.
In a March 22 interview,
University Provost Philip
Hanlon said the new disclo-
sure requirement from NIH
would require the University to
assemble an "elaborate" elec-
tronic database tracking con-
flicts of interest at a recurring
cost of $700,000 annually. He
also cited new mandatory eth-
icstrainingfor researchers who
work with human subjects as
an additional compliance cost.
"We do north of a half-billion
dollars in research for NIH,
and this is a very big deal," Pol-
lack said. "They've changed
the reporting requirements,
See COMPLIANCE, Page 5A

LSA sophomore Hillary Bedeian practice self defense techniques in the Central Campus Recreation Building as part of a self-defense workshop yesterday.
STUDENT H EALTH
'U' offers mental health aid

If needed, students
are encouraged
to utilize campus
programs
By ADAM RUBENFIRE
Daily Staff Reporter
In light of the recent off-cam-
pus deaths of two University stu-
dents, and as finals season fast
approaches, mental health pro-

fessionals from across campus,
in interviews with The Michigan
Daily, urged students who are
struggling to utilize the variety
of services offered to students
with psychological difficulties.
One of the most visible men-
tal health resources on campus
is Counseling and Psychological
Services. CAPS provides a wide
array of services to students seek-
ing help with psychological and
behavioral issues. In addition to
CAPS, the University also offers
immediate guidance to students

at the University Health Service
and at the University Hospital
through its University of Michi-
gan Health System Psychiatric
Emergency Service program.
CAPS AIDS WITH
PREVENTATIVE AND
PROACTIVE SERVICES
CAPS Director Todd Sevig,
the campus lead for student men-
tal health, emphasized the role
of CAPS in identifying mental
health problems in students, fac-

ulty and staff.
"We know, the sooner you
catch things and the earlier you
intervene, you have a better
outcome," Sevig said. "So with
mental health care, what we're
talking about is the whole host
of wellness services, of online
quick things that you can look at
... and we know that that prevents
things from getting worse."
Sevig chairs the University's
Mental Health Workgroup - a
group of medical professionals,
See MENTAL HEALTH, Page 5A

CAMPUS EVENTS
Event aims to make
positive change

Mt
dents
found
ard o
scree
the D
an in
um at
Th
welin
cation
throu
a ser
shops
Th
put oi
a nat
tion
to cr
throu
tion.
at the
Vegas
now
II re
event
sity H
throu
Pepsi
grant
event
comm

Take Back the "The goal has evolved in the
years since it's inception in 2006
Campus hosts and has taken a bigger scope,"
Kohen said. "What we want is to
movie night create momentum for a positive
change movement."
By JOSH QIAN Kohen said the event is based
Daily Staff Reporter on the theory that if an individu-
al feels well mentally and physi-
ore than 450 University stu- cally, they have the ability to go
and Ann Arbor residents out and prompt positive change.
a way to get their wiz- "We have taken research in
n last night by attending a positive psychology, including
ning of "Harry Potter and the concept of mindfulness, to
eathly Hallows" along with create interactions and hopefully
teractive wellness continu- take people on a continuum to
the Michigan Theater. help them find something they
e event strived to encourage are personally passionate about,"
ess and healthy communi- Kohen said.
n in everyday interactions Kohen said the event will not
igh an inclusive concert and only bring people together, but
ies of ten reflective work- also help them to start think-
called Epitome. ing about how they can dedicate
is fourth-annual event was more of their time to doingthings
n by Take Back the Campus, they feel passionately about.
ional non-profit organiza- "The purpose of the event is
that encourages students to have people get in touch with
eate change for the better their well-being through reflect-
igh increased communica- ing," Kohen said. "We want to
TBTC was started in 2006 give people a break to think
University of Nevada, Las about where they are currently
s campus by Scott Kohen, in their lives and help them move
the hall director of Baits in the right direction with their
sidence hall. This year's journey."
was sponsored by Univer- Kohen added that they chose
lousing and funded mainly to screen Harry Potter and the
igh a $10,000 grant from tteathly Hallows at the event
's Refresh Project. The because Harry was able to
was given based on the change his adverse prophecy.
's potential impact on the "You can change ryour fate.
nunity. See CHANGE, Page 3A

ACADEMIC TESTING
Students
await MCAT
alterations
Upcoming changes
to test will take
effect in 2015
By JOSH QIAN
Daily StaffReporter
Members of the Univer-
sity's medical community have
expressed mixed emotions on
pending changes to the Medi-
cal College Admission Test,
which will be implemented in an
attempt to help medical schools
select more well-rounded candi-
dates who excel beyond the sci-
ences.
The MCAT is a standardized,
multiple-choice examination
administered by the Association
of American Medical Colleges
and required for admission by
most medical schools in the Unit-
ed States. The test is currently
composed of four sections: physi-
cal sciences, verbal reasoning,
writing sample and biological
sciences. However, in February,
the AAMC approved three major
changes to the exam, which will
go into effect in January 2015.
According to the preview
guide for MCAT2015 published
by the AAMC, the natural sci-
ences sections have been revised
to reflect recent changes in medi-
cal education. In addition, two
See MCAT, Page 3A

American Culture lecturer Bruce Conforth receives the Golden Apple Award at tackham Auditorium yesterday.
Confortli receives
Golden Apple award

American Culture
lecturer praises
fulfilled living
By MOLLY BLOCK
Daily StaffReporter
In honor of winning the
22nd annual Golden Apple
Award, American Culture lec-
turer Bruce Conforth delivered
his ideal last lecture, "Heed-

ing the Call," to an audience
of about 200 students, faculty
and community members in
Rackham Auditorium, utiliz-
ing his multitude of popular
culture references and person-
al anecdotes.
Conforth, who was among
about 100 nominees, was pre-
sented the Golden Apple for
his exceptional dedication to
teaching. He said receiving
the award was the most mem-
orable moment in his entire

career, which includes serving
as the director of curatorial
and educational affairs at the
Rock and Roll Hall of Fame
Museum in Cleveland.
On March 14, the Students
Honoring Outstanding Teach-
ing, a University of Michigan
Hillel student committee,
presented Conforth with the
Golden Apple Award - the
only student-bestowed award
for teaching at the University.
See CONFORTH, Page 3A

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INDEX
Vol. CXXII, No.122
®212 The Michigan Daily
michigondaily.com

N EW S ......................... 2A SPO RTS ......................6A
AP NEW S .................3A CLASSIFIEDS..............6A
OPINION - ............. ...4A TH E B-SIDE..........1......1B

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