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March 26, 2012 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2012-03-26

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GAME. SET. MATCH.
'Hunger Games' sets the bar for
young-adult film adaptations.
> PAGE 7A

EARLY EXIT
Michigan dropped its first-round
game to Cornell in Green Bay.
INSIDE

(NB 11lNI)lI)7 T\\INTY-TWvO rlt \YIAS (IF ED)ITOIUAIL FR1EEf)OM
Monday, March 26, 2012

Ann Arbor Michigan

michigandaily.com

UEC to consider
revisions to code

After lengthy
hearings, Parikh
declared next CSG
president
By GIACOMO BOLOGNA
Daily Staff Reporter
In the wake of a series of
lengthy hearings in relation to
last week's controversial Central
Student Government presidential
election, members of the Univer-
sity Elections Commission called
for a review of the election code

to prevent similar occurrences in
the future.
The five-person commit-
tee voted 3-2 to issue only four
demerits to recently elected CSG
President and Business junior
Manish Parikh, just one short
of the five demerits that consti-
tute disqualification. The deci-
sion came following a marathon
hearing, which began Thursday
at 7:30 p.m. and ended on Friday
at 7 a.m.
The hearing proved crucial
in determining the eligibility of
Parikh after the election results
were tabulated and showed he
had won.

Parikh, and his running mate
LSA sophomore Omar Hashwi,
garnered 31.54 percent of the
vote. YouMICH candidates Busi-
ness junior Shreya Singh and LSA
junior Ethan Hahn finished sec-
ond with 29.7 percent of the vote.
The MForward and OurMichi-
gan candidates finished a distant
third and fourth.
Election director Peter Borock
wrote the commission's opinion
from the hearing and voiced his
thoughts of the election code.
"The Central Student Govern-
ment Compiled Code article on
elections is poorly constructed,
See UEC, Page 2A

SIDNEY KRANDALL/Daly
Dance Marathon participants dance through the last hour of the 15th annual event this weekend.
15th annualM
raises over $500,000

Money raised at
Dance Marathon
to aid local
children
By YOUNJOO SANG and
EMILY KASTL
Daily Staff Reporters
As 1,000 weary partici-
pants completed 30 hours of
non-stop dancing at the 15th
annual Dance Marathon at
the University of Michigan
this weekend, they found sol-
ace in knowing that they had
cumulatively helped raise a

record-breaking $510,325.76
for pediatric therapy.
To commemorate 15 years
on campus, DMUM gave more
than $500,000 to North Star
Reach - a camp in Pinckney,
Mich. that provides free year-
round camping opportunities
for children with illnesses
- and formally presented a
check to the organization at
the marathon's closing cer-
emony yesterday at the Indoor
Track Building.
In an interview before the
event, LSA senior Amanda
Koons, DMUM community
outreach chair, said the orga-
nization sought to expand
their proceeds to areas

beyond just the University of
Michigan Health System.
"It's our 15th year, and we
were looking for a way to fur-
ther our cause, not only at our
two hospitals, but in the sur-
rounding community," Koons
said. "We thought this was a
good way to expand our reach
into the community."
The more than half-million
dollars raised this year will
support non-traditional ther-
apies for children with cere-
bral palsy, hearing loss and
autism.
Alex Ham-Kucharski, a
child with autism, was one
of many children who were
See DMUM, Page 3A

UNIVERSITY RESEARCH
Policy to aid 'U'
business efforts

STATE STREET SUN BATHING

SPEAKERS ON CAMPUS
NPR's Harris speaks
on science reporting

Pr
n
*lic
p
Un
and 1
oppo
close
lished
An
the
busin
versi
licen
tual
from
the s
Previ
proce
resew
final
Ste
versit
reseaa
proac
it h
betw
ners a
ers in
partn
"W
in an

rogram allows the table for research, they'll
know exactly what rights
iegotiation of they'll have to that research,"
Forrest said. "That was
ensing early in always ambiguous, but now
they can figure it out on day
partnernship one."
According to Forrest, the
By JOSH QIAN new policy is one of many
Daily Staff Reporter that have been put in place to
allow the University to work
niversity researchers more closely with industry.
businesses will have the "We are interested in
rtunity to work more bringing the best programs
ly under a newly estab- and problems into the Uni-
d licensing policy. versity for research," For-
tnounced last Monday, rest said. "And we also want
new program allows to make sure the state and
tesses that sponsor Uni- the nation benefit from the
ty research to negotiate research. And one of the real
se rights for any intellec- vehicles is through the indus-
property that may result trial sector."
the research before The policy is only applica-
tart of the partnership. ble to agreements that involve
iously, the negotiation at least $250,000 in annual
ess occurred after the funding and would last at
rch project was in its least three years, according
stages. to a University press release
ephen Forrest, the Uni- announcing the new policy.
ty's vice president of The principal research facul-
rch, said the policy is ty members will also have the
tive in nature since option to opt out of the policy
elps prevent conflicts under their sole discretion.
een the business part- Daryl Weinert, director
and University research- of the University's Business
n the later stages of the Engagement Center, said the
tership. BEC worked with the Office
hen a company comes of the Vice President for
d puts a lot of money on See BUSINESS, Page 3A

SIDNEY KRANDALL/Daily
A student basks under a blossoming tree outside of the Michigan Union yesterday.
CAMPUS GROUPS
Students seek to unite
four Gredek com-mittees

Journalist shares
difficulties of
engaging the public
By TAYLOR WIZNER
Daily StaffRepoter
When the Deepwater Hori-
zon exploded in April 2010,
spewing into the Gulf of Mex-
ico, one journalist sought to
investigate beyond the surface
to uncover the hidden enor-
mity of the disaster.
At the 125th anniversary
celebration of the Environ-
mental Health Sciences
Department on Friday, Rich-
ard Harris, a science reporter
for National Public Radio,
discussed his experiences as
a reporter in the field. Dur-
ing his keynote address at the
event, hosted by the School of
Public Health, Harris shared
his account of covering the
Gulf oil spill of 2010 and
uncovering the extent of the
oil leakage from the Deepwa-
ter Horizon pipe.
In an interview after the
speech, Harris said his expe-
rience working with a team of
scientists that discovered the
oil spill was more severe than
initially reported, inspired his
desire to continue to pursue
environmental journalism.

"I found some scientists
that could analyze the flow
(from a video of the oil leak-
age) and they realized there
was as much as 10 times the
oil coming out of there as
the official estimate," Harris
said. "The government had to
change the estimate of how
much oil was coming out, and
BP was in a position of figur-
ing outa different way of cop-
ing with this volume of oil. It
was one of those times you
think, 'I can make a difference
as a reporter."'
Harris - who has severed
as a science reporter for NPR
for 26 years and broadcasts
on the "Morning Edition,"
"All Things Considered" and
"Weekend Edition" programs
- covered the United Nations
climate negotiations in
December, the Gulf of Mexico
oil spill and was a contributor
to the NPR award winning
series, "Climate Connections,"
which addresses the various
aspects of climate change and
how it is changing the world.
Harris discussed the diffi-
culties in communicating the
realities of science to the pub-
lic, particularly in the areas
of global warming and radia-
tion, where news consumers
are often skeptical. He said
covering these stories is often
See NPR, Page 3A

Leaders of Greek Life
hesitant to merge
councils together
By LIANA ROSENBLOOM
Daily StaffReporter
As students in Greek Life recently
began discussions on an initiative to
unite the community's four councils,
their plan has been met with trepida-
tion by other Greek community lead-

ers.
Thestudentsare apartoftheCam-
paign to Integrate Greek Life, which
had its third meeting last Tuesday.
The Greek community is divided
into four councils - Panhellenic
Association, Interfraternity Coun-
cil, Multicultural Greek Council and
the National Pan-Hellenic Council.
Leaders of the campaign are rally-
ing for more cooperation and com-
munication between the four groups,
which they say are extremely divided
See GREEK, Page 3A

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