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March 23, 2012 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2012-03-23

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beFidligan, MIih2j
Friday, March 23, 2012

Ann Arbor, Michigan

michigandaily.com

HEARINGS DELAY CSG RESULTS

As of 4 a.m., student
government election
winners yet to be
announced
By GIACOMO BOLOGNA
Daily StaffReporter
As of 4 a.m, a group of about 20 peo-
ple filled the single-room LSA student
government offices where the fate of
yesterday's highly contested Central
Student Government presidential elec-
tion - receiving the highest voter turn-
out in recent history with 19 percent
- rested in a hearing of the University
Elections Committee to determine the
eligibility of multiple candidates.
No results had been determined as
of 4 a.m., following nearly eight hours
of deliberation on a case filed by LSA
junior Robert Bowen on behalf of
OurMichigan and youMICH against
Business junior Manish Parikh, an

independent candidate for CSG presi-
dent, regarding misuse of an e-mail
listserv for campaigning purposes, a
violation of student government elec-
tion policy. New accusations also arose
early this morning against the Our-
Michigan party for engaging in similar
acts of listserv exploitation, spurring
further investigations by the UEC.
A candidate can be individually dis-
qualified from the election with a total
of five demerits and an entire party
can become ineligible with a total of
10 demerits among party members.
Numerous. members of several campus
political parties continually filed in an
out of the CSG offices on the third floor
of the Michigan Union yesterday for
hearing-related matters until adjourn-
ing to LSA-SG offices when the Union
closed at 2 a.m.
The hearing was still ongoing early
this morning as the UEC continued to
determine if Parikh and his running
mate, LSA sophomore Omar Hashwi,
had warranted enough demerits for
disqualification from the election, and

For updated election results
visit
michigandaily.com
began further examinations against
OurMichigan.
CSG President DeAndree Watson
said this spectacle was unparalleled.
"I have never seen anything like this
since I have been involved in student
government," Watson said. "I'm con-
cerned with the time it's going to take
to sort through all the complaints that
have been filed and I hope we can get
through this as quickly as possible."
Watson added that these hear-
ings could reflect badly on the people
involved, noting that he believes more
complaints may be filed before the
results are released. The polls officially
closed at midnight yesterday, and offi-
cial results can't be released until the
hearings have been completed.
"Depending on what the outcome
See HEARING, Page 3

Business junior Manish Parikh and LSA sophomore Omar Hashwi, indpenedent candidates for
CSG president and vice president, at a University Elections Commission hearing yesterday.

STUDENT GOVERNMENT
Canning
wins LSA-SG
presidency

SPEAKERS ON CAMPUS
New Republic
editor discusses
new Obama book

15.
u

By GI
andA
Afte
posed
Caroli
junior
elected
presid
govern
Afte
15.4 p
dents
LSA-S
and vi
kin sa
s "very,
the tu
compe

Tunout at helped increase numbers,
but that advertising done
4 percent in by LSA-SG also helped.
"We did a ton and it real-
ncontested ly paid off," Larkin said.
In addition to presiden-
tial elections, LSA stu-
dents elected freshmen
ACOMO BOLOGNA Carly Manes, Lauren Roth,
LUSTEN HUFFORD Corey Walsh, Natasha
aily Staff Reporters Dabrowski, Patrick Larkin
and Kevin Malerman, and
errunninginanunop- sophomores Joshua Dean,
election, LSA junior Andrew Craft and JoHan-
ne Canning and LSA na Rothseid to the nine
Melissa Burns were representative positions
d president and vice contested in this election.
ent of LSA student In total, 18 LSA students
nment yesterday. ran for the nine representa-
er two days of voting, tive positions.
ercent of LSA stu- Canning, who has been
cast ballots online, an LSA-SG representative
G election director since her freshman year,
ce president Jeff Lar- said she is prepared to take
id. Larkin said he was on the new role as head of
very happy," with a student government rep-
rnout. He added the resenting more than 17,000
titive CSG elections See CANNING, Page 3

MCKENZIE BEREZIN/Daily
Carl Weinman lectures about teaching methods in the Ross School of Buins yesterday.
Hands-on learning lauded

Noam Scheiber
shares how he
examined the
financial crisis
ByALICIAADAMCZYK
Daily StaffReporter
Though President
Barack Obama's efforts to
solve the 2008 economic
crisis were extensively
covered by the media,
author and journalist
Noam Scheiber searched to
find the less widely known
individuals who played an
influential role in advising
the president in his fiscal
decisions.
The Ford School of Pub-
lic Policy held a special
public lecture and book
signing yesterday after-
noon with Scheiber as
part of the school's Distin-
guished Speakers Series.

At the event, Scheiber, a
senior editor for The New
Republic magazine based
in Washington, D.C., dis-
cussed his recently pub-
lished book, "The Escape
Artists: How Obama's
Team Fumbled the Recov-
ery" to an audience com-
prised of Ann Arbor
residents, students and
faculty.
In an interview before
the event, Scheiber saidbhe
decided to write the book
after he realized the enor-
mity of the economic crisis
of September 2008.
"It became clear that it
wasn't going to be a gar-
den-variety recession,"
Scheiber said. "It was
really sort of a deep, pain-
ful thing that had some
dramatic possibilities and
some room for ... critiqu-
ing the way (the financial
team) handled it."
Though the book does
See NEW REPUBLIC, Page 3

Nobel laureate Carl
Weiman shares
teaching experiences at
event at Ross School
By AARON GUGGENHEIM
DailyStaff Reporter
At a lecture crowded with University
faculty and students at the Ross School
of Business yesterday, Nobel laureate
Carl Wieman spoke about improvingsci-

ence and engineeringeducation by mov-
ing away from traditional lecturing, and
implementing more interactive learning
techniques at the collegiate level.
With an economy becoming increas-
ingly based on scientific research,
Wieman - who won the Nobel Prize
in Physics in 2001 - emphasized the
importance of a scientifically literate
population, noting that establishing
stronger science and engineering pro-
grams is crucial to fostering internation-
al growth.
"Education is so important in the
See LEARNING, Page 3

UNIVERSITY RESEARCH REMEMBERING TRAYVON
Drug may cause healthier cells

Researchers synthesize
chemicals to increase
calcium flow to cells
By JOSH QIAN
Daily StaffReporter
University researchers may have
discovered a modern-day fountain of
youth with the recent development of
a potential drug that may aid cellular
recycling and slow the aging process.
The research team - headed by
Haoxing Xu, an assistant professor of
molecular, cellular and developmen-
tal biology, and composed of Andrew
Lieberman, an associate professor
of pathology, and Hollis Showalter, a
medicinal chemistry research profes-
sor - synthesized a collection of chem-

icals that increase calcium flow to cell
lysosomes, which serve as recycling
centers for cellular waste.
"The importance will be similar to
the trash-removal system in our daily
lives that includes trash bins and jani-
tors," Xu said. "Increased cellular-
recycling activities could provide
a treatment for diseased cells with
excessive accumulation in the lyso-
some and/or slow trafficking."
The research is currently funded by
the National Institutes of Health and
the ML4 Foundation - a non-profit
corporation founded by families of
individual affected by the genetic dis-
ease mucolipidosis type IV.
Xu said the research results demon-
strate that the drug has the potential to
treat unique metabolic disorders such
as Niemann-Pick disease and mucolip-
See DRUG, Page 3

Students protest the death of Florida teenager Trayvon Martin in the Law Quadrangle yesterday afternoon.

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INDEX N E W S.............. 2
Vol. CXXII,No.114 AP NEW S ................... 3
©2012 The Michigan Daily O P I N I O N . ........ 4
michigondoilyrcom

A RT S ............................5
CLASSIFIEDS.............6
SPO RTS.............. ....6

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