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March 06, 2012 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2012-03-06

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THE KID GUPTILL
C Michigan's standout freshman haner-bngwrtedAndewsteddhed
had a big birthday yesterday. hsps uia ~ peiy
PAGE 8 PAGEw7
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Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tuesday, March 6, 2012

michigandaily.com

V .. _. J.

SENATE ASSEMBLY
SACUA calls
* for policy on
misconduct

STUDY GAMES

Committee crafts
resolution to
audit reporting
procedure
By KATIE BURKE
Daily Staff Reporter
In the wake of the Universi-
ty of Michigan Health System's
six-month delay in reporting to
police that a former University
Health System resident pos-
sessed child pornography, the
Senate Advisory Committee
on University Affairs drafted a
resolution yesterday to investi-
gate the University's process of
reporting suspected criminal
activity between professionals
and vulnerable individuals.
The resolution calls for a
University-wide audit of poli-
cies regarding the official pro-
cess of reporting professional
misconduct among doctors,
nurses, social workers and
teachers in their relation-
ships with minors and the
elderly. SACUA also motioned
to include daycare providers
and physical therapists in the
policy.
SACUA member John
Lehman, a professor of ecology

and evolutionary biology, said
the resolution should include
rights to both the informer
and the accused, noting that
reporters should feel confident
in divulging information with-
out consequences and accused
parties should have the right to
defend themselves.
"The policies should safe-
guard the reporter from
retaliation ... (and) ensure
appropriate supervision and
sanctions where necessary
with rights for meaningful
appeal for sanctioned indi-
viduals," Lehman said at the
meeting.
Lehman said victims should
have an opportunity to face the
accused with the assistance
of an advocate, though the
committee expressed concern
about allowing such contact
due to the vulnerability of the
victims.
Instead of direct communi-
cation between the victim and
accused, the committee agreed
to allow for the opportunity of
a fair hearing for the accused.
SACUA member Ed Roth-
man, a professor of statistics,
said the wording of the reso-
lution could deter potential
reporters of criminal activity
from approaching officials.
See POLICY, Page 5

LSA junior Amy Evron studies in the Michigan League neara stack of board games yesterday.
ANN ARBOR CITY COUNCIL
Council passes
transit0proposal

CAMPUS COMMUNITY
Technical
problems
delay gym
TV usagen
Though installed four
months ago, screens
still not functioning
By AARON GUGGENHEIM
Da ily StaffReporter
During a recent run on the
treadmill at the Central Campus
Recreational Building, LSA junior
Olivia Mariani watched the moni-
tors mounted on the wall above her
playing advertisements for pro-
grams and activities sponsored by
the University's Department of Rec-
reational Sports.
The screens did not, however,
deliver the long-awaited television
programming for which they were
intended since their installation four
months ago.
Last year, the University spent
$1.6 million to renovate fitness facil-
ities on campus as part of a project
spearheaded by E. Royster Harper,
the University's Vice President for
Student Affairs. In order to deter-
mine how to best utilize the funds,
studies were conducted to discover
which upgrades would most appeal
to students, including the instal-
lation of television screens last
See GYM, Page 5

I

[n vote, members between Ann Arbor, Ypsilanti,
Washtenaw County and the
vote in favor of Ann Arbor Transportation
Authority to
four-party plan provide mass 6
transit for the
By TAYLOR WIZNER next 30 years
Daily StaffReporter - establishes d
that the city
After hours of deliberation, will adhere to
e Ann Arbor City Council City Act 195,
proved a four-party mass an ordinance that calls for a
ansit agreement in a seven- countywide mass transit sys-
-four vote yesterday. tem as opposed to city-man-
The agreement - a pact aged transportation.

While the plan was passed,
the finances of the system were
not officially ratified. Members
of the plan's financial task
force in attendance issued a
statement in which they said
though they could not present-
ly submit a conclusive agree-
ment, council should still pass
the agreement.
There was opposition to the
agreement as some council-
members expressed discontent
to the framework of the transit
See TRANSIT, Page 5

th
ap
tr
to

ELECTION 2012
Kal Penn to visit in
support of Obama
re-election campaign
Famous actor part Penn, Stephanie Cutter, Obama's
deputy campaign manager, and
of national tour to Broderick Johnson, senior cam-
paign adviser, will also be in
promote yattendance.
In an e-mail interview with
By STEVE ZOSKI The Michigan Daily, Penn
Daily Staff Reporter wrote that Obama offers college
students much more than his
Best known for playing Kumar Republican opponents. Specifi-
Patel in "Harold and Kumar Go callyhe credited the repeal of the
to White Castle" and Dr. Law- military's
rence Kutner in "House," actor "don't ask
Kal Penn now plays a more seri- don't tell"
ous role - campaigning for Presi- policy, the
dent Barack Obama's re-election. end of the
As part of the campaign, war in Iraq,
Penn will visit the University on the passage
Thursday night in collaboration of Obama's
with Obama for America's Young healthcare reform law and more
Americans' Greater Togeth- as reasons why the president
er Summit Tour - a series of deserves another four years in
events held on college campuses office.
throughout the country during "The contrast here couldn't be
February and March designed more clear," Penn wrote. "All of
to promote Obama's re-election the president's opponents have
campaign and encourage stu- made pledges to roll back his key
dents to register to vote. The accomplishments for young peo-
event is sponsored bythe Univer- ple. All of the president's oppo-
sity's chapter of College Demo- nents have made it clear that if
crats and is taking place in the elected, they would undo many
Michigan Union Ballroom. of those accomplishments. We
During his visit at the Uni- can't let that happen."
versity, Penn will lead students Penn noted that theyouthvote
in a panel discussion regarding was pivotal to the president's
various national issues that have 2008 campaign, and urged stu-
been central to the 2012 presi- dents to be politically active in
dential election. In addition to See PENN, PageS5

Emergency reponders work to put out a fire at Broadway Auto Care on Broadway Street last night.
Fire severely damages Broadway Auto Care

Cause of blaze
unknown, no
injuries reported
By AUSTEN HUFFORD
Daily StaffReporter
Ann Arbor Fire Department
crews from all five of the city's
stations responded shortly
after 6:30 p.m. after a fire broke
out at Broadway Auto Care at
1026 Broadway Street, near the
University's Kellogg Eye Cen-
ter.
In an interview at the scene

of the fire, Assistant Fire Chief
Steven Lowe said AAFD fire-
fighters were able to extinguish
the blaze before it spread to
other buildings. There were
no injuries reported by either
employees or firefighters
and the cause was unknown,
according to Lowe.
Ann Arbor Police officers
blocked eastbound traffic on
Broadway Street from Maiden
Lane to the junction of North
Division Street and Beakes
Street. Two ambulances were
also on scene.
According to Lowe, AAFD
received a call from bystanders

who witnessed the fire. When
crews arrived, Lowe said they
witnessed "heavy fire" coming
from two of the shop's three
repair bays, as flames crawled
up the back of the store and the
windows.
DTE Energy employees also
shut off the store's natural gas
and electric lines. Lowe said
the utilities were turned off to
prevent further harm to the
building or responding fire-
fighters.
Once visible fires were extin-
guished, firefighters punctured
the building's walls to ensure
that no flames remained. The

building suffered serious dam-
age and three cars that were
located inside the bays at the
time of the fire appear to be
destroyed.
Lowe said the AAFD will be
investigating the cause of the
fire.
"One of our fire investiga-
tors will follow up with an
investigation to try to pinpoint
what exactly happened," Lowe
said.
Store employees declined to
comment about the fire.
- Online Editor Zach Bergson
contributed to this report

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INDEX NEW S .......................2 CLASSIFIEDS...............6
Vol.CXXIl, No.102 OPINION .....................4 ARTS................ 7
©2012TheMichiganlDaily S U D O K U .....................5 SPORTS............
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