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January 30, 2012 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2012-01-30

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SUNDANCE CELEBRATED ICE IN THE DESERT
Premieringfm a Good Time, Call .Luke Moffatt's trail from Arizona to
ws met by an enthusiastic crowd. college hockey was far from standard.
PAGE 5A INSIDE
U iie A*}_. 'icJt~ . .y* dF9d..1 , .. . .i 1an,k\..J40a C~I'iIO j

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Monday, January 30, 2012

michigandaily.com

New ed.
policies
cause
doubts
0 Officials, experts
worry federal gov't
could overstep role
By JOSEPH LICHTERMAN
Editor in Chief
Though President Barack Obama's
remarks Friday morning were met
with unbridled enthusiasm from a
majority of the 4,000 people who
packed Al Glick Field House to see
him, the higher education policies he
unveiled in the speech faced scrutiny
and trepidation from higher educa-
tion leaders and experts.
During his address, the president
unveiled a handful of policies aimed
at making college more affordable.
These projects include an expan-
sion of federal aid to universities that
would be tied to tuition costs, a Race
to the Top competition for states
to earn federal dollars and a higher
education report card that would
require universities to release more
information about their financial aid
offerings.
Several public university presi-
dents across the country, includ-
ing University President Mary Sue
Coleman, expressed concern that
the Obama administration was
tying federal aid to tuition levels as
states continue to cut higher educa-
tion appropriations, creating budget
shortfalls for many public institu-
tions.
After Obama's speech, Coleman
said she supported the president's
See DOUBTS, Page 3A

ALDEN REISS/Daily
President Barack Obama address a crowd of 4,000 at Al Glick Field House on Friday.
Obama advocates for
financial aid reform

Opinion
on pres.
varies
greatly
Outside event,
protesters rally for
several issues
By HALEY GOLDBERG and
AUSTEN HUFFORD
Daily News Editor and For the Daily
Despite the 20 degree weather,
members of the University com-
munity, Ann Arbor and Michigan
residents joined the capacity crowd
of 4,000 people that slowly passed
through security and filed into
Al Glick Field House early Friday
morning to hear President Barack
Obama present his plan for financial
aid reform.
Attendees expressed a variety
of perceptions about his address
and the president's overall perfor-
mance as a leader thus far, some
demonstrating strong support, oth-
ers expressing feelings of disillu-
sion. In addition to the students who
waited eagerly outside, clutching
tickets they had waited all-night to
receive, a group of protesters also
formed outside the event, dispelling
the president's stance on issues from
abortion to the Israeli-Palestinian
conflict.
Before the speech, LSA senior Jon
Hornstein said he looked forward
to hearing Obama's plans for high-
er education, particularly since he
intends to work in higher education
consulting after graduation. After
the speech, Hornstein said he felt
Obama's address was well delivered.
See OPINION, Page 6A

4,000 pack Al
Glick Field House
on Friday
By BETHANY BIRON and
JOSEPH LICHTERMAN
Managing News Editor and
Editor in Chief
Speaking before a bleary-
eyed capacity crowd of 4,000
who waited in the wee hours
of the morning Friday to
secure a prime spot, President
Barack Obama stressed the
importance of higher educa-

tion by announcing a handful
of new proposals to combat
student debt.
During his address at Al
Glick Field House, the Michi-
gan football team's indoor
practice facility, Obama
unveiled a plan that would
allocate $10 billion in federal
aid each year to colleges and
universities that limit tuition
increases. Ann Arbor was
Obama's last stop on a three-
day, five-state, trip following
his State of the Union address
on Tuesday.
"We are putting colleges on
notice - you can't keep - you

can't assume that you'll just
jack up tuition every single
year," Obama said. "If you
can't stop tuition from going
up, then the funding you get
from taxpayers each year will
go down."
Obama also proposed a
$1 billion Race to the Top
program that would award
funding to states that make
an effort to continue to fund
higher education and limit
tuition hikes.
"We're telling the states,
if you can find new ways to
bring down the cost of col-
lege and make it easier for

we'll help you do it," Obama
said. "We will give you addi-
tional federal support if you
are doing a good job of mak-
ing sure that all of you aren't
loaded up with debt when you
graduate from college."
In an interview with The
Michigan Daily, Secretary of
Education Arne Duncan said
the administration is working
to make more resources avail-
able to students. The presi-
See OBAMA, Page 8A

FINE ART FOCUS

In effort toward sustainability,
'U' constructs LEED buildings

Former MAIS employee Pat Smith recieves instruction trom Heather Accurso during an UMMA drawing class.
GRADUATE ST UDENT EMPLOYEES
Petition drafted to oppose union

Newly-opened
hospital to be
certified
By PETER SHAHIN
Daily StaffReporter
High ceilings, natural light-
ing and cork flooring may appear
to simply be the trappings of the
posh Ross School of Business.
However, those pleasing aesthet-
ics serve a different purpose - to
uphold the University's commit-
ment to sustainable building
practices.
Despite formalizing its com-
mitment to Leadership in Ener-
gy and Environmental Design
only a year ago, the University is
home to several LEED certified
buildings that are adhering to
more environmentally sustain-
able practices. The Ross School
of Business, the Samuel T. Dana
Building and the newly-opened
C.S. Mott Children's and Von
Voigtlander Women's Hospital
are among the first LEED certi-
fied buildings on campus.
The U.S. Green Building Coun-

cil oversees the LEED program,
with guidelines that provide a
framework for a host of building
types and projectsi LEED certi-
fication requires the use of recy-
clable and sustainable materials
in the building process, water
and energy conservation, avoid-
ing harsh or poisonous chemicals
in the construction and main-
tenance of the building, and the
creation of a positive atmosphere
for those who will occupy the
building.
Terry Alexander, executive
director of the Office of Cam-
pus Sustainability, said the first
building on campus to achieve
LEED certification was the Dana
building, fittingly the home of
the School of Natural Resources
and Environment, but the Uni-
versity formally adopted LEED
last January as a standard for
all new large-scale construction
projects.
"That was an actual formal
decision by the Environmental
Sustainability Executive Coun-
cil that (University) President
(Mary Sue) Coleman chairs to
adopt LEED as a design policy
for the campus," Alexander said.

CONTINUING SERIES
SUSTAINABILITY
ON CAMPUS
"At this time it's all new non-
clinical, non-medical buildings
over $10 million (must be LEED
certified)."
Along with implementing
LEED standards, USGBC also
evaluates buildings after their
construction to ensure obser-
vance of the guidelines.
According to Jaime Van
Mourik, director of higher edu-
cation for USGBC, LEED stan-
dards strive not only for energy
efficiency, but also for the use
of sustainable materials. Van
Mourik said that while the first
sustainability push in the 1970s
focused almost solely on energy
conservation, the focus was too
narrow, which led to the creation
of the LEED standards in 2000.
"At this time, higher education
is actually the leading market
sector of all the different mar-
ket sectors ..." Van Mourik said.
"There are over 4,700 LEED
See LEED, Page 3A

With hearing
nearing, Prof.
writes letter
By RAYZA GOLDSMITH
Daily News Editor
In the final days preceding
the hearing before an admin-
istrative judge on Wednesday,

students and faculty are orga-
nizing in opposition to the
unionization efforts Graduate
Student Research Assistant of
some.
A petition in the form of a
letter addressed to the Univer-
sity's Board of Regents, which
had 700 signatories as of mid-
night, launched on Thursday
night. Engineering Prof. Faw-
waz Ulaby, one of a number

of professors who started the
petition, publicized the peti-
tion on Friday with an e-mail
sent to an official College of
Engineering graduate student
listserv, according to Rackham
student Stephen Raiman, presi-
dent and founder of Students
Against GSRA Unionization.
While SAGU was unin-
volved in the petition's launch,
See PETITION, Page 8A

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INDEX NEWS............. 2A CLASSIFIEDS..............6A
Vol. CXXII, No.83 OPINION....................4A ARTS.. . .........7A
(2OtlTheMichiganDaily CROSSWORD ...............6A SPORTSMONDAY..........1B
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