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November 30, 2011 - Image 2

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chigan Daily - michigandailv.com

2A - Wednesday, November 30, 2011

The Mic

2A - Wednesday, November 30, 2011 The Mi

I

WINTER WONDERLAND

Tele iihlgan Daily
420 Maynard St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1327
www.michigandaily.com
STEPHANIE STEINBERG ZACH YANCER
Editor in Chief Business Manager
734-418-4115 ext. 1251 734-418-4115 ext. 1241
steinberg@michigandaily.com zyancer@michigandaily.com

Check, mate?

Fifteen University
students in the Ann
Arbor Chess Club are
aiming to revitalize
the perceived drab
game and generate
exciting opportunities
for new members.
The organization
held competitions
between its members
this fall and plans to
enter intercollegiate
tournaments during
the winter semester.
Business School
junior Diana Tabak,
president of the club,
is passionate about
the game and the

club's future potential.
Tabak's parents play
chess so she learned
as a child, and the
campus group offered
her the opportunity to
continue playing.
Tabak said despite
general public opinion,
the game of chess is a
lot of fun.
"No matter how
long you play chess
you can never really
get tired of it because
there's always some-
thing new," she said.
"You can always
improve."
Tabak emphasized

the club's desire to
recruit new members
and the many oppor-
tunities available for
players of all skill lev-
els.
"No matter how
much experience.
you've had with chess
before, you'll be fine,"
Tabak said. "You'll
find somebody who's
at your level, and you'll
be able to win. And if
you want to find some-
body who you'll be los-
ing to, you can do that
too."
-ERINFORSYTHE

Newsroom
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tonnections
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Arts Section
arts@michigandaily.com
Sports Section
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News Tips
news@michigandaily.com
Lettes tothe Editon
tothedaily@michiandaily.com
Editorial Page
opinion@michigandaily.com
Photography Section
photo@michigandaily.com
Classified Sales
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Finance
finance@michigandaily.com

LSA sophomore Lorne Carter appreciates one of Ann Arbor's first snow fal
Rackham Auditorium yesterday.
CRIME NOTES

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES

Chair not there Purse snuck

WHERE: C.S. Mott
Children's and Von
Voigtlander Women's
Hospital
WHEN: Monday at about
5:15 p.m.
WHAT: An office chair has
been stolen and missing
since Nov. 1, University
Police reported.
Smoking is
destructive
WHERE: Medical Science
Unit I
WHEN: Tuesday at about
3:10 a.m.
WHAT: The Ann
Arbor Fire Department
extinguished a small
fire on the north side of
the building, University
Police reported. The fire is

from stafter
WHERE: South Quad
Residence Hall
WHEN: Monday at about
7:40 a.m.
WHAT: A purse was stolen
from a staff member on Nov.
27 between 5:30 p.m. and
6:05 p.m., University Police
reported.
Bumping it
WHERE: 1600 East
Medical Center, M-18
Carport
WHEN: Monday at about
4:55 p.m.
WHAT: A vehicle reversed
into another vehicle
and caused damage to
the bumper of the car,
University Police reported.
No injuries were sustained

Stress and
study talk
WHAT: Students are
invited to a session on how
to manage stress as the end
of the semester approaches.
WHO: Counseling and
Psychological Services
WHEN: Today at 4:15 p.m.
WHERE: Pierpont
Commons, Valley Room
Photoshop
workshop
WHAT: Students will have
the opportunity to become
aquainted with the Adobe
program Photoshop during
a hands-on demonstration
showing how to use
the software to create
animations.
WHO: Living Arts
Programming Board
WHEN: Today at 7 p.m.
WHERE: Duderstadt
Center, Windows Training
Rooms

CORRECTIONS
* A Nov.29 article in
The Michigan Daily
("Students support
Egyptian protesters
in rally on Diag")
misidentified Daniel Hast.
He is an LSA junior.
" A Nov.22 article in
The Michigan Daily
("MSA election turnout
fais3percent from
last year") incorrectly
stated the percentage of
students who voted in
the Michigan Student
Assembly election. A
previous headline of the
article also incorrectly
stated the percentage
the turnout fell from
last year. The election
turnout was 7 percent.
" Please report any
error in the Daily
to corrections@
michigandaily.com.

Soccer ball heading
may cause brain
trauma, similar to the
damage caused by football
concussions, CNN reported.
Excessive heading of soccer
balls are related to impaired
memory and cognitive
processing speed.
About 800 Univer-
sity students use the
online dating website
DateMySchool.com. Stu-
dents say online dating can
be better than the bars for
finding a significant other.
" FOR MORE, SEE THE STATEMENT,
INSIDE
Studies revealed that
coffee and espresso can
block the absorption or
increase the effects of certain
medications, The New York
Times reported. The cause
may be other compounds
that exist in coffee beside
caffeine.

EDITORIALSTAFF
Nick Spar Managing Editor nickspar@michigandaily.co
Nicole Aber Managing News Editor aber@michigandaity.con6
S ONEWSEDITORS:BethanyBiron,DylanCinti,CaitlinHuston,JosephLichterman
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITORS: Haley Glatthorn, Claire Goscicki, Suzanne Jacobs, Sabira
Kahn, Michele Narov, Paige Pearcy, AdamRubenfire, Kaitin Williams
MichelleDewittand opinioneditors@michigandaily.comt
Emily Orley Editorial Page Editors
SENIOR EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS: Aida Ali, Ashley Griesshammer, Andrew Weiner
ASSISTANT EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS: Harsha Nahata, Timothy Rabb
StephenJ.Nesbittand sportseditors@michigandaily.com
Tim Rohan Managing SportstEditors
SENIOR SPORTS EDITORS: Ben Estes, Michael Florek, Zach Helfand, Luke Pasch, Kevin
Raftery,Nl Rotschild
SSISNe ORSEDITORS: Everett Cook, Matt Rudnitsky, Matt Slovin, Liz
Vukelich,DanielWasserman
SharonJacobs ManagingArtsEditor jacobs@michigandaily.com
SENIOR ARTS EDITORS: Leah Burgin, Kavi Pandey, Jennifer Xu
ASSISTANT ARTS EDITORS: Jacob Axelrad, Cassie Balfour, Joe Cadagin, Emma Gase,
Proma Khosa, David Tao
Marissa McClain and photo@michigandaily.com
Jed Moch Managing Photo Editors
ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITORS: Erin Kirkland, Allison Kruske, Terra Molengraff,
Zach Bergson and design@michigandaily.com
Helen Lieblich Managing Design Editors
SENIOR DESIGN EDITOR: Anna Lein-Zielinski
ASSISTANT DESIGN EDITORS:Kristi Begonja, Corinn Lewis
Carolyn Klarecki Magazine Editor klarecki@michigandaily.com
DEPUTY MAGAZINEEDITORS: Stephen Ostrowski, Devon Thorsby, Elyana Twiggs
JoshHealy copyChief copydesk@michigandaily.com
SENIOR COPY EDITORS: Christine Chun, Hannah Poindexter
Sarah Squire WebDevelopment Manager squire@michigandaily.com
BUSINESS STAFF
Julianna Crim Associate usiness Manager
Rachel Greinetz sales Manager
Alexis Newton Production Manager
Mehan Rooneyc ayounaer
Connor Byrd nance anager
QUy Vo Circulation Manager
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fa and
winter terms by students at the University of Michigan. one copy is available free of charge
to llredes ddtolcopemaybe pckedupat the Dalyt'sofie or$2 Sbscrptons for
$115,s yeons tember through Aprilsis$195sUniversitya ates are subject to educed
The Mchigneals:,amnmb eoe ociatedraesad Thes soatedColeatePess

4

} B 1 SC $
L
g "
$4 i*ll i*on Peru gol
" "
y s mine project sus ended
P

Mining co. hopes
to restore order
after protests and
escalating violence
LIMA, Peru (AP) - The own-
ers of a $4.8 billion gold and cop-
per mining project, the biggest
such investment in Peru, said
yesterday they were suspending
it at the government's insistence
following increasingly violent
protests by highlands peasants
who fear for their water supply.
Newmont Mining Corp.
spokesman Omar Jabara told
The Associated Press via email
that the aim is to help restore
public order.
Denver-based Newmont is
the majority owner of the Conga

project, which was to begin
production in 2015 and is an
extension of Yanacocha, Latin
America's biggest gold mine.
Political leaders in Peru's
northern state of Cajamarca
began an open-ended general
strike against the project last
Thursday and violence has been
escalating, including vandalism
and clashes with police.
The Yanacocha consortium,
which includes the Peruvian
company Buenaventura Min-
ing Co. and the International
Finance Corporation, said in a
statement that the suspension
was "required by the Govern-
ment of Peru for the sake of
re-establishing tranquility and
social peace."
Yesterday, at least 20 people
were injured, including eight by
gunfire, in clashes between pro-

testers and police, the region-
al health director, Reynaldo
Nunez, told Canal N. He said
one was in critical condition.
Police said protesters sacked
Conga offices in the town of
Celendin.
Protest leaders said police
fired tear gas and shotgun blasts
at them
Before the suspension
announcement, government
officials continued to insist the
protests did not enjoy wide-
spread support.
"We regret the intransigence
of the leaders who do not want
to engage in dialogue," Inte-
rior Minister Oscar Valdes told
reporters. "We regret that they
are against their own popula-
tion, children who aren't going
to school, dairy farmers who are
losing their milk."

Hassan Saleh, 9, who has a heart muscle disease known as cardiomyopathy and is awaiting a transplant, gets a visit from
Brian Mundell, captain of the Valencia High School baseball team, at Children's Hospital Los Angeles on Nov. 22.
Study: Fewer children in
U. S. lack health insurance

4

Number of uninsured
children decreases
due to expansion of
Medicaid program
MIAMI (AP) - Even with
more children living in poverty
because of the rough economy,
the number of children without
health insurance in the U.S. has
dropped by 1 million in the past
three years, according to a report
released yesterday by George-
town University.
Many states have expanded
eligibility for, and simplified
access to, the children's Med-
icaid program. This has helped
shrink the number of uninsured
children from 6.9 million in 2008
to 5.9 million in 2010. Experts
say the Affordable Care Act, the
federal health care overhaul
that requires states to maintain
income eligibility levels and dis-
courages other barriers to cover-
age, has played a key role in the
improvement.
Overall, 34 states had a signifi-
cant decrease in the rate of unin-
sured children.
Florida made the most prog-

ress, dropping from 667,758 to
506,934 during that time period,
although the state still has one
of the highest rates of uninsured
children in the nation.
Minnesota, Kansas and Wis-
consin saw an increase in the
number of uninsured children.
Nevada has the highest rate of
uninsured children while Massa-
chusetts has the lowest, accord-
ing to the report.
The findings are based on an
analysis of new health insurance
data from the Census Bureau. It
was done by the Georgetown Uni-
versity Health Policy Institute's
Center for Children and Families.
The news comes as the number
of uninsured adults has risen in
the past few years.
High unemployment rates and
the increasing cost of private
insurance are driving more fami-
lies to the federal-state Medicaid
and Children's Health Insurance
Programs, also known as CHIP.
Both programs provide health
insurance for children, but come
from different funding streams
and allow states more flexibility
in how they run their programs.
President Barack Obama
signed an extension of CHIP
and provided $87 billion to help

states pay for Medicaid in the
2009 economic stimulus, and
experts say a bipartisan national
commitment aimed at cover-
ing children has given states
new tools and incentives to fol-
low through. For example, some
states once required face-to-face
interviews; now many states
have online applications.
The Affordable Care Act
should also help preserve these
gains going forward, said Joan
Alker, co-executive director
of the Georgetown University
research center
"We will move to a culture
of coverage. The presumption
is everyone has insurance," she
said. "Families will feel there's
an option out there for them."
The Supreme Court has
agreed to hear arguments chal-
lenging the constitutionality of
the historic health care overhaul
next year.
Floridaled the nation in reduc-
ing the number of uninsured
children, in part because the
state's Medicaid rolls swelled as
the economy soured. But legisla-
tion passed in 2009 has also sim-
plified the process and reduced
penalties for those who don't pay
premiums.

Ivory Coast's ex-president
Gbagbo en route to Hague

4

Former president headed to The Hague. "He's in
the plane," Katinan said. The
under house arrest public prosecutor's office in
Ivory Coast said Gbagbo changed
extradicted planes in Bouake, the regional
capital, before continuing to the
ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast (AP) - Netherlands.
Ivory Coast's former strongman, "I can confirm that he left
who nearly dragged his country Korhogo at 6:31 p.m. GMT. He is
into civil war in a bid to retain passing through Bouake, because
power, is being extradited to the the landing strip in Korhogo can
International Criminal Court fol- only accommodate a small plane."
lowing the issue of a warrant for Gbagbo's Paris-based lawyer
his arrest, his spokesman said Emmanuel Altit said he had filed
yesterday. an appeal to stop the interna-
The ex-president has been tional arrest warrant issued yes-
under house arrest in the tiny vil- terday through Ivory Coast state
lage of Korhogo over 300 miles prosecutors, but acknowledged
(500 kilometers) north of Abi- that if it's not granted, the ex-
djan since being ousted by inter- president would be transferred
nationally backed forces seven overnight.
months ago. The development, which
In Abidjan, Gbagbo's spokes- comes almost exactly a year to
man Kone Katinan confirmed the day after Ivory Coast's dis-
that the former ruler had left the puted presidential election, was
remote village on a special flight applauded by victims of Gbag-

bo's regime and by rights groups
because of the signal it sends
against impunity.
Once he arrives in The Hague,
Gbagbo will become the first
former head of state to be taken
into custody by the tribunal since
its founding in 2002. Sudanese
President Omar al-Bashir has
been indicted, though he refuses
to surrender, while former Libe-
rian warlord Charles Taylor and
Yugoslav leader Slobodan Milos-
evic have been tried there by spe-
cial ad hoc tribunals, rather than
the international court.
The move could further stoke 4
tension in Ivory Coast, however,
because it gives the appearance of
victor's justice, since grave abus-
es were also committed by forces
loyal to the country's democrati-
cally elected leader, Alassane
Ouattara, who enlisted the help
of a former rebel group in order to
force Gbagbo from office.

I

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