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November 29, 2011 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2011-11-29

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ENEWA :CULT CLASSIC
" of U~ran 'Martha Marcy May Marlene'
explores the re-socialization of
An The Game.v a former cult member.
PAGE 7 PAGE 8
)N EB I l i )HLr VI EN T XV( Y) W EA1 S F 1 1211 To ( l \L F1 1 ,IA )N1
Tuesday, November 29, 2011

Ann Arbor, Michigan

michigandaily.com

COLLEGE EXPENSES
eTextbook
deal could
reduce costs
for students

Rackham student Mostafa Bedewy holds an Egyptian flag during a rally on the Diag yesterday condemning Egyptian military brutality. The Egyptian Student
Association planned the event, and members of the organization discussed the importance of democracy in Egypt and the United States.
dents support Egyptian
protesters rally on Diag

'I-
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if
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dents
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The
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T' officials plan trators hope to launch a pilot
program in the fall 2012 term,
launch Campus Courant said. Currently, the plan-
ners are looking for several hun-
xtbook Initiative dred professors to participate in
next year's program.
lot in fall 2012 Courant called the rising cost
of college textbooks a "public
By JOSH HEALY textbook crisis," noting that some
Daily Copy Chief students pay up to $1,000 a term
for their books.
the prospect of playing "Candidly, we want to go after
Birds or having instant those profits on behalf of our stu-
to thousands of books dents," Courant said, speaking
already convinced stu- about the money textbook corn-
to invest in e-readers, panies make off student sales.
money on University text- Courant told the lead faculty
might do the trick. governing body that if the initia-
versity Dean of Librar- tive is implemented, a student
ul Courant introduced the registered for a lecture would
us eTextbook initiative pay a $45 fee to gain access to the
nt of the Senate Advisory class's texts, with the option to
nittee on University Affairs buy a hard copy of the text for an
day. The initiative, which additional $20 to $35. By charg-
llective effort of the Office ing a fee, the University would
Provost, University Librar- be able to sell e-textbooks to stu-
td Information and Tech- dents at about 35 percent of the
cal Services, is focused on regular price. Students would be
ing the cost of textbooks able to download the books onto
cture courses with an aver- an e-reader or print the pages out,
trollment of more than 100 Courant said.
nts. University Provost Philip
e University is currently Hanlon said at yesterday's meet-
iating a deal with e-text- ing that the plan might save the
providers, and adminis- See ETEXTBOOKS, Page 5

Egyptian Student taking a stand in Ann Arbor.
The grassroots activism that
Association holds ignited the Egyptian revolution
also appeared on the Diag yester-
demonstration to day afternoon, as about 20 stu-
dents from the Egyptian Student
promote awareness Association led a protest to raise
awareness about military brutal-
By ALEXANDRA ity against unarmed civilian pro-
MONDALEK testers in Egypt.
Daily StaffReporter Members distributed flyers
that read, "stop sales of tear gas
In response to Egyptian citi- to the Egyptian military" as they
zens' protests against their gov- chanted phrases like "from the
ernment, University students are desert to the sea, all of Egypt will

be free."
Since last January, anti-gov-
ernment protests in Egypt have
exploded, and the reactions of
the government have become
increasingly aggressive. The
military used rubber bullets and
tear gas against civil protesters.
About 40 civilians have died, and
at least 2,000 have been wound-
ed in this month's protests alone.
ESA members said they hoped
to bring awareness of the mili-
tary brutality in Egypt to the
University.

"We don't want our U.S. tax
dollars to go towards tear gas,
bombs and repressive weaponry
against peaceful protesters,"
Rackham student Atef Said, a
member of ESA, said in an inter-
view at yesterday's event.
Though Egyptian citizens
have made considerable gains
toward a more democratic gov-
ernment since January, Said said
there is still much to overcome,
including a resilient military and
questionable police force that
See RALLY, Page 5

LEGAL DISPUTE
ACLU files lawsuit against
AATA over rejection of ad

A2 Transportation against the Ann Arbor Trans-
portation Authority concerning
Authority declines the company's
refusal to sell
ad boycotting Israel advertising
space to an Ann
By HALEY GLATTHORN Arbor activist O
Daily StaffReporter who promotes
boycotting
The Michigan chapter of Israel.
the American Civil Liberties Following AATA's refusal of
Union filed a lawsuit yesterday activist Blaine Coleman's ad,

which was intended to read
"Boycott Israel, Boycott Apart-
heid," the ACLU lawsuit claims
AATA's advertising policy,
which requires all ads to be "in
good taste" and bans advertis-
ing that is "likely to hold up to
scorn or ridicule a person or
group of persons," is in violation
of the First Amendment due to
its "vague" nature. The ACLU
See ACLU, Page 6

UNIVERSITY ACADEMICS
To professors' dismay, students
still use RateMyProfessors.com

Astronaut John Herrington speaks about how he joined NASA in the Chrysler Center yesterday.
First Native American astronaut speaks
about time in the Space Shuttle Endeavour

Faculty push for
greater visibility of
'U' evaluations
By PHOEBE BARGHOUTY
For theDaily
A red chili pepper that indi-
cates the "hotness" of a professor
maybe a deciding factor for some
students currently registering

for classes next semester.
The pepper represents a cat-
egory on RateMyProfessors.com
- a popular website many Uni-
versity students visit to preview
the 3,178 University instructors
profiled on the site. Some pro-
fessors, however, prefer stu-
dents use the University's course
evaluations because they say the
evaluations are a more accu-
rate judgment of their teaching
styles.

Rossie Hutchinson, a commu-
nication studies lecturer at the
University who received an over-
all quality of 4.8 on the site, said
she believes students are inclined
to use RateMyProfessors.com as
a resource because the Univer-
sity does not make official pro-
fessor evaluations available to
students soon enough.
"The moment I turn grades
in, I can see my evaluations,"
See PROFESSORS, Page 6

John Herrington Earth.
Herrington, a retired Navy
motivates students officer and NASA astronaut,
spoke to tiore than 120 stu-
to pursue passions dents at the Chrysler Center on
North Campus yesterday about
By JOSH QIAN his journey as an astronaut and
For the Daily encouraged University students
to follow their passions.
In the fall of 2002, John B. During his 40-minute
Herrington, the first Native speech, Herrington described
American astronaut, flew on his unforgettable travel to space
the Space Shuttle Endeavour in the Endeavour and his stay at
and spent 330 hours orbiting the international Space Station.

"Space shuttles are a beauti-
ful winged vehicle," Herrington
said. "Hanging outside in space
and seeing the Endeavour right
there is remarkable. It is an
amazing engineering achieve-
ment. I don't think people in
this country realize how dif-
ficult it was and what a unique
platform it is to fly around the
Earth every 90 minutes."
During the mission, Her-
rington performed three extra-
See ASTRONAUT, Page 6

WEATHER HI 37
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