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November 03, 2011 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2011-11-03

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Ann Arbor, Michigan

Thursday, November 3, 2011

michigandailycom

CAMPUS COMMUNITY
SAPAC looks
to future after
25 years at'U'

Sexual Assault
Prevention and
Awareness Center to
add programs
By SABIRA KHAN
Daily StaffReporter
In 1986, University students
held a sit-in at the Office of the
Dean of Students to demand more
resources that inform students
about sexual assault, intimate
partner violence and appropriate
preventive measures.
The sit-in was the catalyst fsr
the creation of the University's
Sexual Assault Prevention and
Awareness Center, which is cel-
ebrating its 25th anniversary this
year.
"SAPAC was actually founded
on the power and passion of stu-
dent voices ..." SAPAC director
Holly Rider-Milkovich said. "And
so the University responded to the
students' needs and SAPAC was
founded."
S Now 25 years later, SAPAC is
looking ahead to reach more stu-
dents, provide more comprehen-
sive strategies for educating the
campus community on sexual
assault and intimate partner vio-
lence and better protect the survi-
vors of these incidents.

Since it began, SAPAC has had a
peer education program available
for interested University students
to participate in. But starting next
fall, all incoming freshmen will be
required to attend the program.
Along with trying to reach a
larger audience, SAPAC is attempt-
ing to collaborate with diverse
communities and groups on cam-
pus. For example, Rider-Milkovich
pointed out that SAPAC has cre-
ated a men's activism program.
"We recognize that men have an
absolutely critical role to play (and)
that we will not eliminate sexual
violence until all the members
of our community are involved,
including men," she said.
Through the years, SAPAC has
modified its practices in order
to meet students' needs, Rider-
Milkovich added. She referenced
new concerns regarding Inter-
net stalking - an issue that was
not relevant when the center was
founded in 1986.
"It is a continual commitment
to make sure that as our students'
lives change, as the circumstanc-
es that they face change, we are
remaining relevant and current
and can address their needs," Rid-
er-Milkovich said.
Working to meet these goals,
SAPAC has adopted a new client-
management database that is simi-
lar to the one used in hospitals and
See SAPAC, Page 5A

LEFT: Electricians Mark Leighton and Rod Udell work on restoring power to East Hall after an unexpected power outage yesterday, TOP RIGHT: A student
outside East Hall, where classes were cancelled yesterday due to the power outage. BOTTOM RIGHT: A class relocated to outside after the power outage,
Classes cancelled after
Central power outage

Eight to 10 campus
buildings lost
electricity
By BETHANY BIRON and
SUZANNE JACOBS
Daily News Editor
and Daily StaffReporter
LSA senior Katherine Mar-
ion was in the middle of a bio-

chemistry exam yesterday in
the Chemistry Building when
the lights suddenly went out.
More than 100 students
continued taking their exams
by emergency lights until the
main lights came on 10 min-
utes, Marion said.
Marion's experience was
a result of a power outage on
Central Campus yesterday
that affected eight to 10 cam-
pus buildings and resulted in

a number of cancelled class-
es. The power outage was
caused by a power failure that
occurred at about 10:05 a.m.,
according to Diane Brown,
spokeswoman for the Univer-
sity's Department of Public
Safety.
As of 12:30 p.m. yesterday,
most of the eight to 10 build-
ings had regained power, with
the exception of East Hall,
which did not have electricity

until 7:30 p.m. last night.
Due to the lack of power,
all classes and exams sched-
uled in East Hall were can-
celled for the rest of the day.
Esrold Nurse, assistant dean
of undergraduate education,
sent an e-mail to select LSA
students announcing the
decision.
"I amwritingto let youknow
due to a major power outage,
See OUTAGE, Page SA

CAMPUS SUSTAINABILITY
Students
seek funds
for projects
to green'U'
Planet Blue Student
* Initiative Fund to
award up to $50,000
for proposals
By RAYZA GOLDSMITH
Daily StaffReporter
University students hoping to
reduce waste at football games and
in the dining halls are taking one
more step toward their goals.
About 40 students gathered in
the Samuel T. Dana Building last
night for an information session
about the Planet Blue Student
Initiative Fund, which is offering
between $5,000 and $50,000 to
students working on sustainability
projects on campus. In President
Mary Sue Coleman's announce-
ment about the initiative earlier
this semester, she guaranteed the
Fund a total of $150,000 over
three years.
LSA junior Abby Krumbein,
a member of the PBSIF Review
Board, said the initiative's goal is
to provide funding for large-scale
sustainability projects to promote
See PROJECTS, Page 5A

A BLUE THUMB

UNIVERSITY ACADEMICS
MSA commission
advocates for dept.
of queer studies

'U' officials
mull creation
of department
By KATIE BURKE
For the Daily
In an effort to broaden the
University's educational offer-
ings on LGBT culture, students
are spearheading an initiative
to start a department devoted to
queer studies.
Students in the Michigan Stu-

dent Assembly's LGBT Issues
Commission want to create a
queer studies department in
LSA that would encompass
studies on the history, issues
and nature of queer culture.
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans-
gender and Sexuality Studies,
also referred to as queer studies,
is currently offered as a minor
in the Department of Women's
Studies.
Members of the LGBT Issues
Commission have discussed
the possibility of creating the
department with faculty and
See MSA, PageSA

University Mike Curley groundskeeper tends to plants by the flagpole near the Diag yesterday.

RESIDENT I sAgL CO LLEtGE
Students succeed without foreign language tllter grades

Most classes in
the college use
traditional grading
By KATIE BURKE
For the Daily
For LSA students sweat-
ing over Spanish vocabulary,
the possibility of a grade-free

language course may seem
like a dream. But for students
studying an intensive foreign
language in the Residential
College, it's a reality.
All students in the RC must
meet the LSA requirement of
two years of a language and
then take a foreign language
proficiency exam followed by
a literature course. Since 2001,
all classes students in prepara-

tion for foreign language pro-
ficiency exams in the RC have
been pass/fail. Rather thangive
students grades, professors
provide students with detailed
evaluation sheets documenting
their performances.
Dominique Butler-Borruat,
head of the RC French Depart-
ment, said that in addition to
language classes, most classes
in the RC also followed the

same system until LSA man-
dated they use a normal grad-
ing scale starting in 2001.
Though post-proficiency class-
es switched to a traditional
grading system that year, pre-
proficiency classes remained
pass/fail.
"It's not about getting an A,"
Murphy said. "It's about get-
ting to where you can pass the
proficiency test."

Despite the changes, Mur-
phy said he thought the new
grading system was positively
received among the RC com-
munity.
"In the grand scheme of
things, students prefer having
grades for their classes," Mur-
phy said.
Because the goal of the pre-
proficiency classes is to pre-
See LANGUAGE, Page 5A

a b~ ..

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