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September 06, 2011 - Image 50

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The Michigan Daily, 2011-09-06

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8E - Tuesday, September 6, 2011

NEW STUDENT EDITION

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

Rivals in the Spotlght

\\9 P _

FILE PHOTO
Botterman closes
out spectacular
senior season

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By MATT SPELICH
Daily Sports Writer
April 17, 2011 - At the begin-
ning of the season, one name was
associated with Michigan wom-
en's gymnastics. By the end of
the season, that same name has
become synonymous with NCAA
women's gymnastics. That name
is Kylee Botterman.
Botterman, Michigan's cap-
tain and All-Around sensation,
completed her senior season
with the highest accolades that
can be awarded to an NCAA ath-
lete.
Amongher individual achieve-
ments, Botterman has been
named the Big Ten Gymnast
of the Year, NCAA All-Around
Champion and the 2011 AAI
Award winner for the top gym-
nast in the NCAA. She is also the
front-runner for the prestigious
Honda Award, decided on April
22nd.
With all the individual atten-
tion, Botterman attributes her
success to one thing - confi-
dence.
"I don't think I'm the most tal-
ented gymnast in the country,"
she said. "But I am confident. I
believe in what I'm going to do
before I get on the apparatus,
and that's something most peo-
ple struggle with. I really value
self-confidence and the men-
tal aspects of gymnastics and I
think my mental strength has led
to a successful career."
In the moments leading up
to her final team competition,
while she was dancing through
her floor routine, Botterman was
almost moved to tears.
"In the middle of my routine

I almost started to cry," Botter-
man said. "I was like, 'This is my
last competition.' And while all
the girls were lined up along the
side I started to say, 'I love gym-
nastics guys, I just love it,' and
they all just started making fun
of me. It was kind of a cheese ball
thing to do, but I'm really going
to miss these moments."
After the Wolverines finished
last at the NCAA Super Six this
past weekend, Michigan coach
Bev Plocki could do nothing but
smile when commenting on Bot-
terman and her career in Ann
Arbor.
"(Botterman) has been the
heart and soul of our program,"
Plocki said. "This season was an
unbelievable season for her. She
missed one routine the entire
year, which is unheard of ... To
say that we're going to miss her
next year is really an understate-
ment. She's a very special ath-
lete, and more importantly a very
special person."
While many would assume an
athlete with Botterman's abil-
ity and love for her sport would
have aspirations to compete at
the next level, this will actually
be her final year of competition.
Instead she is focused on
graduation and on her wedding
to former Michigan hockey star
Chad Kolarik. The Wolverine
power couple has finally set the
date - August5.
Botterman has become a name
synonymous with many words,
but she has always been a woman
of very few. She summed up the
end of her career in one sentence.
"The ride has been fun, but
bittersweet now that it's done,"
Botterman said.

The Ohio State University
In the spring of 1835, angry men from
Michigan and Ohio lined up on opposite
sides of the Maumee River. Taunts were
made, and feelings got hurt. This conflict,
known as the "Toledo War," was a prelude
to a bitter battle beginning in 1897, when
blue- and scarlet-blooded college men
started to anually face off on the gridiron to
take out their ancestral indignation.
Bo Schembechler. Woody Hayes. Charles
Woodson. Archie Griffin. These are names
in a long line of war heroes on both sides
who have made the contest into what ESPN
has called "The Great Rivalry in All of
Sports." Around here, it's known simply as
"The Game:' While the past decade was
dominated by a juggernaut Ohio State pro-
gram, change is in the air.
New Michigan coach Brady Hoke (not
to mention a competent defensive coor-
dinator) has come. Michigan quarterback
and reigning Big Ten Offensive Player
of the Year Denard Robinson is staying.
Former Ohio State coach Jim Tressel (and
his Wolverine kryptonite) is gone. Better
yet, the scandal caused by former Buckeye
quarterback Terelle Pryor has left Ohio
State interim head coach Luke Fickell in
quite a pickle. Could this year finally be the
year Michigan snaps the seven-game losing
streak against Ohio State?
Nobody knows, but on November 26,
everyone will be watching when the two
teams lay out 114 years' worth of good old-
fashioned hate at Michigan Stadium.
- HEIKO YANG
Michigan State University
There's no love lost between Michigan
and Michigan State, and the battle for in-
state supremacy between the rivals never
fails to produce big moments. In front of

a world-record-setting cro
hockey game, the Wolverin
Spartans in Ann Arbor at T
at the Big House. With 110,
roaring, Michigan blanked
5-0 behind spectacular pla
defenseman Jon Merrill an
Carl Hagelin, each of whor
The dominating perforn
football team's loss to the S
October. In what started a,
streak, Michigan State shre
verines' abysmal defense ii
For the first time in 14 year
basketball team won a gam
Center, ending a six-gamel
They later capped off their
with their first series swee
in 14 years.
Notre D
The Wolverines have be
Irish ever since Fielding Y
Bend, Ind. pit stop in 1887
Michigan football team th
Dame how to play football
ignited one of college foot:
toric rivalries. The Wolver
lead the all-time series 22-
matchup won't be just ano
scoreboard. Sept. 10 welco
ing Irish back to Michigan
Arbor's first night game in
history. At this historic gan
coach Brady Hoke will loot
wings - winged helmet, th
rousing chorus of "The Vic
The Wolverines have no

toric matchups against the Fighting Irish on
the gridiron, but on the ice as well. There
is not so much a division rivalry between
Michigan and Notre Dame when it comes to
wd for an ice college hockey, but instead a new spirit of
aes took on the competition that overcomes the two teams
'he Big Chill when they hit the ice to play. In the 2010-11
.000-plus fans season, the Wolverines edged out the Irish
the Spartans by just two points at the end of CCHA con-
y from freshman ference play. Notre Dame's hockey success
d senior forward has been heightened within the past decade
m had two goals. under the leadership of coach Jeff Jackson.
sance avenged the Jackson has already led Notre Dame to a
Spartans in early 116-65-22 record, earning the Irish two
three-game losing conference championships and two regular-
edded the Wol- season championships in just the past five
n a 34-17 victory. years. Notre Dame also clinched their sec-
's, Michigan's ond bid to the Frozen Four this past season
e at the Breslin with a win over New Hampshire.
losing streak. Yost and Knute Rockne. The feelings
'Big Ten schedule between these two coaches can only be
p of the Spartans described through their decade-long feud -
one of the bitterest the game of football has
STEVEN BRAID ever known. Each led an unbeatable team,
and it was Yost who pushed for Notre Dame
to not be included in the Big Ten. Several
ame years later, Michigan coach Fitz Crisler con-
tinued to boycott the Irish, denying Notre
en fighting the Dame coach Frank Leahy any matchup
ost took a South between the two powerhouses. After 1943,
Yost and the the Wolverines wouldn't see another Irish-
en taught Notre man on the field for 35 years. Then there
and consequently was Bo. Michigan coach Bo Schembeehler
ball's most his- worked with Notre Dame head coach Lou
ines currently Holtz back at Ohio State and reestablished
15-1, but the 2011 a relationship between the two schools. But
ther tally on the by the end of his career, Bo saw the tension
mes the Fight- between the Wolverines and Irish, and of-
Stadium for Ann fered a few words of advice - 'To hell with
Michigan football Notre Dame:' Fast-forward 100 years from
ne, Michigan Yost's days on the gridiron, and the power
k to earn his of Fielding Yost's and Knute Rockne's feud
at is - and a still stands, this time seeping through each
tors." school's fans.

I

4
I

t only had his-

- EMILY BONCHI

Blue's season comes
to a disappointing end
against Penn State

A,-Slice o ChICC)qG,
Ann ApLcr!! ?.,
House
^i0
ice 19

By DANIEL WASSERMAN
Daily Sports Writer
May 21, 2011 - In what has
become a theme of the season,
Michigan fell just short.
The Wolverines broke a
scoreless tie in the fourth
to take a 2-0 lead over Penn
State, but the Nittany Lions
broke it open with a six-run
fifth and hung on to win, 11-8.
Fifth-year senior Matt
Gerbe started Senior Day,
going 4.1 innings and striking
out a career-high five in the
loss.
Michigan (7-16 Big Ten,
17-37 overall) managed 11 hits
and benefited from five Penn
State errors, but left 13 run-
ners on base - a problem that

has plagued the Wolverines
all year.
Penn State (12-12, 32-20)
scored in four of the last five
innings, scrapping out 13 hits
off six Michigan pitchers. 4
The Wolverines made
things interesting in the
eighth, scoring five runs to
make it a two-run ballgame,
but couldn't find the equal-
izer with the go-ahead run at
the plate.
The Nittany Lions learned
in the third inning that they
had clinched the final spot
in the Big Ten Tournament
thanks to an Indiana loss.
Having already been elimi-
nated from postseason play,
Michigan's season comes to a
disappointing end.

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