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October 28, 2011 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2011-10-28

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4

2 - Friday, October 28, 2011

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

MONDAY: TUESDAY: WEDNESDAY: THURSDAY: FRIDAY:
In Otherfvory Towers This Week in History Professor Profiles Campus Clubs Photos f the Week 01C Daily
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ing a Muggle Quidditch game"Editor in Chief Business Manager
Sunday, Oct. 23. Mich igan won 734-418-4115 ext.1251 734-418-4115 ext.1241
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4

CRIME NOTES

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES

Standing room Exhausted fan Perry and Electronic
only WHERE: Molecular& Fonda visit performance
R h -,inrl Nasrc;n o

WHERE: Law Quadrangle
WHEN: Wednesday at
about 12:40 p.m.
WHAT: A coffee table and
a chair were reported miss-
ing from a lounge, Univer-
sity police reported. The
items have been missing for
about two weeks.

ienaviorai ieuroscience
Institute
WHEN: Wednesday at
about 1:40 p.m.
WHAT: An exhaust fan in
a fume hood was damaged
during a power outage last
week, University Police
reported.

WHAT: Record producer
Richard Perry and actress
Jane Fonda will discuss
their careers and take
questions from students.
WHO: School of Music,
Theatre & Dance
WHEN: Today at 4:30 p.m.
WHERE: Rackham
Graduate School

Putt and snatch The mystery of
WHERE: UniversityGolf the master Drawing with
Course co orepencils
WHEN: Wednesday at WHERE: Dennison

WHAT: A performance by
Digital Music Ensemble
combines electronic music
and movement.
WHO: School of Music,
Theatre & Dance
WHEN: Today at noon
WHERE: Moore Building
CORRECTIONS
*An article in the
Oct. 27 edition of The
Daily ("Officials discus
city's pot licensing')
misidentified the
person who spoke about
higher government
legislation. It was City
Council member Sabra
Briere. The article also
incorrectly stated there
are inefficiencies with
the city's statutes.
* Please report any
error in the Daily to
corrections@michi-
gandaily.com.

T HR EE TH INGS YOU
SHOULD KNOW TODAY
In a speed-dating study,
scientists found couples
who use similar amounts
of personal pronouns, prepo-
sitions and articles were more
than three times as likely to
want to date each other than
couples who didn't, The New
York Times reported.
The No. 4 Michigan
hockey team had no
problem dismantling
the notion's top defense, 5-2,
last night at Yost tce Arena.
Freshman Phil Di Giuseppe
scored twice.
W> FOR MORE, SEE SPORTS, PAGE8
A-la the Oscar-winning
film Slumdog Million-
aire, a poor Indian gov-
ernment clerk won $1 million
on the popular Indian ver-
sion of "Who Wants to Be a
Millionaire," FoxNews.com
reported. Sushil Kumar is the
first person to win the prize.

SENIOR NEWS EDITORS:Bethany Biron, Dylan Cinti, Caitlin Huston, Joseph Lichterman,
Brienne Prusak
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITORS: Haley Glatthorn, Claire Goscicki, Suzanne Jacobs, Sabira
Kahn, Michele Narov, Paige Pearcy, Adam Rubenfire, Kaitlin Williams
MichelleDewitt and opinioneditors@michigandaily.com
Emily Orley Editorial PagetEditors
SENIOR EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS: Aida Ali, Ashley Griesshammer, Andrew Weiner
ASSISTANT EDITORIALPAGE EDITORS: Harsha Nahata, Timothy Rabb
Stephen J. Nesbitt and sportseditors@michigandaily.com
Tim Rohan Managing Sports Editors
SENIOR SPORTS EDITORS: Ben Estes, Michael Florek, Zach Helfand, Luke Pasch, Kevin
Raftey, Net othsc.hild
AS"I aNSPORS nDITORS: Steven Braid, Everett Cook, Matt Rudnitsky, Matt
Slovin,LizVukelich,DanielWasserman
SharonJacobs ManagingArtsEditor jacobs@michigandaily.com
SENIOR ARTS EDITORS: Leah Burgin, Kavi Pandey, Jennifer Xu
ASSISTANT ARTS EDITORS: Jacob Axerad, Cassie Balfour, Joe Cadagin, Emma Gase,
Proma Khosa, David Tao
Marissa Mctlain and photo@michigandaily.com
Jed Moch Managing Photo Editors
ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITORS: Erin Kirkland, Terra Molengraff, Anna Schulte
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Helen Ueblith Managing DesigotEditors
SENIOR DESIGN EDITOR: Anna Lein-Zielinski
ASSISTANT DESIGN EDITORS: Kristi Begonja, Corinn Lewis
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SENIOR COPY EDITORS:Christine Chun, HannahPoindexter
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lnranESayed Pubicoeditn publiceditor@mchigandaily.com
BUSINESiSTAFF
Julianna Crim Associate BusinessManager
Rachel GreinetzS ales Manager
Alexis Newton ProductionManager
Meghan Rooney Layout Manager
Connor Byrd Finance Manager
Qy Vo circulation Manager
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-%7) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and
winter terms by students at the University of Michigan.3One copy is avaiable free of charge
to alreaders. Additional copies may be picked up at the Daily's office for $2. Subscriptions for
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The MichiganODily i amember ofTe Aoiated PessndnThesoiatedollegite Pes.

E
U

about 2 p.m.
WHAT: A purse was stolen
from a parked car between
12:50 and 2 p.m, Univer-
sity Police reported. The
car window was smashed,
and the purse has not been
loeaed.

Building_
WHEN: Wednesday at
about 6:40 p.m.
WHAT: A building key was
reported stolen between
Oct. 6and 11, University
Police reported. There are
no susects.

WHAT: Participants will
be instructed on how to
blend and layer with colored
pencils in their drawings.
Those interested must
register and bringtheir own
materials for the workshop.
WHO: University of
Michigan Museum of Art
WHEN: Today from 2:30
p.m. to 4 p.m.
WHERE: UMMA

Idaho professor discussed shooting
students before killing graduate

University professor
committed suicide
after killing 22 year
old he dated
BOISE, Idaho (AP) - A Uni-
versity of Idaho professor who
committed suicide after killing
a graduate student he had dated
previously talked about shooting
students in his classroom and was
targeted in a complaint alleging
he was engaging in "sex orgies"
with students, according to newly
released documents.
The slain graduate student,
Katy Benoit, 22, complained to
university officials in June that
assistant psychology professor
Ernesto Bustamante had pointed
a gun at her three times. Benoit
was urged to take safety precau-

tions and go to police.
Another student evaluating
Bustamante last fall complained
his teaching was erratic and thathe
had discussed shooting students. In
December, a complaint called into
a university hotline accused Busta-
mante of having sex with students
and coercing one into having sex
with him and others.
University officials have
defended their response to Ben-
oit's complaint, saying they
contacted Moscow police imme-
diately after she came forward.
They told law enforcement that
a student had been involved in a
domestic violence issue but did
not detail Benoit's allegations.
University spokeswoman Tania
Thompson said under school poli-
cy, Bustamante first had a chance
to respond to the complaint,
which he was served in early July
after university officials received

permission from Benoit.
"He, at that point, has a right
to respond to those allegations,"
Thompson said.
Bustamante denied Benoit's
allegations and told administra-
tors that they had a friendship
that had dissolved after she stole
prescription pills from him. Ben-
oit later told university officials
she "screwed up" the relationship
by stealing the pills, but she was
really scared after he threatened
herwith agun.
Bustamante resigned his posi-
tion effective Aug. 19, and three
days later, police said he shot Ben-
oit nearly a dozen times outside
her Moscow home. Bustamante
committed suicide in a hotel room
shortly after shooting Benoit and
was found with six guns and med-
ications for bipolar disorder and
severe anxiety, police said.
Bustamante, who had been
known to alternately refer to
himself as a "psychopathic kill-
er" and "the beast," disclosed he
took medication for bipolar dis-
order shortly after he was hired
in 2007. As early as the fall of
his first semester, three or four
students went to psychology
department chairman Ken Locke
to express concerns about Busta-
mante's behavior, saying he was
"flirtatious" and showed favorit-
ism to students.
Benoit had met Bustamante in
the fall of 2010 when she took a
psychology course he was teach-
ing, and by the end of the semes-
ter, they were dating.
During student evaluations
of Bustamante that fall, another
student complained about the
professor's behavior.
"He talked about shooting
students, which was disturbing,
and implied that he was (and we
should be) drunk and high every
other day," said the student, who
is not identified in the teaching
evaluations.
In December 2010, Bustaman-
te met with administrators to
discuss a complaint that an anon-
ymouscaller put into a univer-
sity hotline, saying Bustamante
was having sexual relationships
with students.

COSTUMES bust
From Page 1 meeti
spec
organization's meeting last Berlt
night that she thinks females LS
on campus should be entitled to mon
wear whatever they please on F-W
the holiday. to im
"I think that girls should be sheq
able to wear whatever they want for m
on Halloween," Lester said. "G
Based on costume sales at fort]
local businesses, many women they
on campus will wear relatively Tam
risque costumes compared to guys
a less sexy standard pumpkin As
or witch. Catherine Berlucchi, atten
manager of Allure Boutique on, ing,I
East Liberty Street, said the said
items that transform a run-of- dres
the-mill cat costume into a sex inten
kitten are still in high demand. rath:
and
PERRY gan.
From Page 1 grea
crow
singles for legends such as Tina Pe
Turner, Diana Ross, Ray Charles, retur
Ella Fitzgerald and Ringo Starr, the
began his 46-year career a few theat
months after graduating from more
what was then known as the years
University's School of Music in ing h
1964. as a
"The University instilled a MUS
high level of musicianship," was
Perry said in an interview with the
The Michigan Daily. "Plus, I prod
had the opportunity to study the
almost all of the major instru- musi
ments well enough to teach show
them. It was very handy to be of pr
able to be comfortable with any and'
of the instruments that I would featu
encounter." of th
Though Perry took vocal and "V
instrumental music classes, his ater
experiences with acting, musical ingu
theater and the Men's Glee Club 25-se
were among his favorites. ater
"I was originally majoring in said.
music, but then I wound up fall- TI
ing in love with theater," Perry close
said. "I played most of the lead audi'
roles in the MUSKET produc- show
tions every year, and that was ing t
probably my most memorable ater.

store sells garter belts,
crs and fishnet tights to
the demand of students
ifically before Halloween,
ucchi said.
SA sophomore Gia Tam-
e, another member of
ord, said women often dress
opress their male peers, but
questions if the same is true
nen.
irls are usually dressing
he guys because that's what
think that they have to do,"
mone said. "But are the
dressing for the girls?"
s the only male member in
ndance at the F-Word meet-
LSA senior Matt Mortellaro
he thinks students often
s up on Halloween with the
ntion of impressing others
er than for their own enjoy-
fun experience at Michi-
I just love the smell of the
sepaint and the roar of the
vd."

ment.
"I reject the idea that we
dress strictly for ourselves,"
Mortellaro said. "I'm not sure
that's possible."
Though there might be a
mentality among female stu-
dents that men prefer scantily
dressed women on Halloween,
some male students believed the
contrary. LSA freshmen Scott
Marlatt and Benjamin Sch-
mutzer said they would rather
approach a girl dressed in a cre-
ative and unique costume at a
party, rather than a girl dressed
provocatively.
"I think that it's wrong,"
Marlatt said. "A lot of girls are
pressured into it because it's
what every other girl does ... the
nurse costume, the sailor - all
those things are overplayed."

4

a

erry
ned to
musical
iter scene
e than 40
s after tak-
is last bow
member of
SKET - he
recently
consulting
ucer for

Jane Fonda
and Richard
Perry Q&A
Today at
4:30 p.m.
Rackham
Auditorium
Free

Broadway
ical "Baby It's You." The
, which details the careers
oducer Florence Greenberg
60s girl group The Shirelles,
ures well-known pop songs
e era.
We started in a 25-seat the-
in Los Angeles, so watch-
us grow and take it from a
eat theater to a 100-seat the-
was really amazing," Perry
hough "Baby It's You" has
ed, Perry said seeing his
ences fall in love with the
wwas the best part of return-
o the world of musical the-

"We never failed to get a
standing ovation every single
night," he said. "So the audienc-
es loved it, and that was, in one
word, rewarding."
Perry's visit to the University
will bring him face-to-face with
a different school than the one
he left - the campus and the
music department have changed
drastically since his time here.
"When I was (at the Universi-
ty), North Campus had just been
created," Perry said. "I didn't
really spend much time there.
The music classes were still
divided all over campus and took
place in various buildings, but it
was all on Central Campus.
"But I'm sure North Campus
is completely different now. I
wish that I was there now that
the music, theater and dance
programs are under one umbrel-
la."
Though Perry plans to visit
Rackham Auditorium and North
Campus, he has one other Uni-
versity destination on his mind.
"I'm actually really looking
forward to just taking a quick
peek inside of the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre," he said. "I
just want to take a big, deep
breath of nostalgia."

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