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6A - Friday, October 21, 2011

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

6A ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~. -urdy coe 1 01TeMihgnDiy-mciadiyo

TRAINING TOGETHER

FEMINIST
From Page1A
roles ... heroes and heroines can
play in our lives," she said.
Fitzgerald said she graduated
from the University at a time
of political turmoil and female
empowerment through the
women's rights movement. Dur-
ing her time at the University,
females were accepted into the
Michigan Marching Band for the
first time and the University cre-
ated the Department of Women's
Studies.
"My college years were a very
empowering time when I was
here on campus," Fitzgerald said.
Though the Bentley Histori-
cal Library opened on campus
shortly after she graduated,
Fitzgerald said she knew Peter-
son's papers - correspondences
between Peterson and family
members when she was work-
ing with the Red Cross in Europe
during World War II - were
housed there, which gave her
an excuse to return to campus
while researching for her book.
Fitzgerald praised the "wonder-
ful staff" and "beautiful setting
of the library" and said it was an

important place for her to find
information on Peterson's past.
Fitzgerald lauded Peterson's
perseverance to enter a male-
dominated field. She told the
audience that as Peterson waited
to formally accept her position
as Michigan Republican Party
chair in February 1965, Max
Fisher, the party's finance chair,
informed her that her salary
would be lower than her prede-
cessor because she was a woman.
Despite the skepticism she
received from co-workers and
the public because of her gender,
Fitzgerald said Peterson contin-
ued to advance her career and
became the assistant chair of the
Republican National Committee
in 1970.
"I think (Peterson is) someone
who obviously, when I was the
age of a student, was a role model
for me," Fitzgerald said. "And I
think it's important that stories
like hers don't get lost along the
way because I think she stood for
a lot of values that are still very
important and sadly often not in
our politics today."
Fitzgerald added that stories
regarding Peterson's progress
through the political ranks were
restricted to the women's section

of newspapers until 1971 when
women's affairs were covered
more often.
Lawrence Lindemer, a former
Michigan Supreme Court justice
who previously served as chair of
the Michigan Republican Party
when Peterson was his secre-
tary in 1957, attended last night's
event. Lindemer also served on
the University's Board of Regents
from 1969 to 1975 while Fitzger-
ald attended the University. Inan
interview after the event, Linde-
mer praised Peterson's work and
said she was an influential per-
son through her work in politics.
"She was one hell of a woman
and one hell of a person," Linde-
mer said.
Closing her talk, Fitzgerald
read a portion of one of Peter-
son's speeches that discussed
increasing governmental tol-
erance with more women and
minorities entering politics.
"In diversity, there is strength
for us as a party. As a commu-
nity, as a nation and in our toler-
ance and fairness to others, lies
the path to being the rational
human beings we all aspire to
be," Fitzgerald read. "May we all
find our way graciously and pas-
sionately down this path."

4

Second-year cadets inthe Air Force ROTC program at the University perform Field Training Preparation exercises outside
the School of Dentistry yesterday.

LIBYA
From Page 1A
(United Nations) have some expe-
rience in the past."
Various news sources have
broadcasted videos of Gadhafi
while wounded and being taken
away from Sirte in the bed of a
pickup truck. While many have
celebrated his death, Levitsky said
there is no point "expressing great
joy" overGadhafi's death. Levitsky
added that with the small triumph
comes great difficulty.
"What we need to do is move
on from here," he said.
Mark Tessler, the University's
vice provost for international
affairs and a professor of politi-
cal science, said Libya has tough
times ahead.
'Tessler added that it would be
incorrect to attribute the coun-

try's victory to NATO alone since
the Libyan people have actively
participated in their own revo-
lution and are now dealing with
establishing a new and unified
government.
"To have a government that is
effective, to have a kind of nation-
al coherence and a national iden-
tity that really means something
- these are all things that Libya
wants and should have and has the
opportunity to have," Tessler said.
LSA senior Aisha Malek lived
in Libya from 2003 to 2005 and
said Gadhafi's death means "a
new start" for Libyans. Malek's
father immigrated to the U.S. to
attend college when he was 17
years old, but years later brought
his wife and four children back to
what Malek remembers as a con-
strained nation. Much of Malek's
extended family still lives in the
country.

."There is no freedom - well
there wasn't," Malek said. "I guess
now things are changing, but
there was really no freedom of
speech at all."
Malek recalled that when she
and her family first arrived in
Libya, her younger sister asked
her uncle what he thought about
Gadhafi. Her uncle was shocked
that she had even asked and told
her to never speak of the dictator
again.
"The rebel forces have kind of
had control for a couple of months
now," Malek said. "But I think
now that he's been captured and
he's dead, too, that it finally means
that it's over - that 42 years of
just a terrible oppressive regime
that people suffered under, that
people were killed under."
- The Associated Press
contributed to this report.

DINING
From Page 1A
ware are instead factored into the
operating budget for University
dining facilities.
"It's more of a nuisance, really,
than anything else because it
essentially takes plates and cups
away from the students who are
trying to use the dining facili-
ties," Logan said.
Though University Housing
doesn't keep track of how many
pieces of dining ware go missing
- whether they are stolen, dam-
aged or accidentally disposed
of - the University spent about
$40,000 last fiscal year to replace
and add necessary pieces. How-
ever, since University Housing
operations are funded by student
room and board rates, Logan
wrote in an e-mail that students
are indirectly paying for the lost
dining pieces.
"The replacement cost of din-
ing wares is not a major expense,
but if you divvy up $40,000
among the 11,000 students with
meal plans, it puts it in a personal
perspective," Logan wrote. "Tak-

ing a cup or a plate or a bowl is
part of that ... it costs everyone."
Business junior Hiral Pithad-
ia said his current off-campus
house contains a fair amount
of dishware and other supplies
that he and his housemates have
acquired from the dining halls.
Pithadia said he always believed
that the University charged an
additional fee to student tuition
or room and board rates to make
up for missing dishware.
"For as long as I lived in the
(residence) halls, I felt that it was
appropriate to, kind of, borrow
some things fromthere,"Pithadia
said, adding that he does not con-
sider himself a thief for taking
cutlery and dishware.
An LSA freshman who wished
to remain anonymous said he
has taken dining ware back to
his room in East Quad Residence
Hall as needed, but always with
the intent of returning it at the
end of the year in the collection
boxes provided by Housing staff.
"I'm not doing it with the intent
ofnever giving it back,"he said. "If
I need a spoon or a fork or a bowl
to eat cereal, I'll take one ... I'll
bringit back at some later date."

The LSA freshman also
described pilfering dining ware
as "getting even" due to the high
cost of tuition and room and
board.
"As tuition gets higher and
higher, what's a few forks worth?"
he said.
Pithadia expressed this same
feeling of retribution and said he
justifies stealing dishes because
of the amount students are
charged per meal, since he can
find cheaper options outside the
dining halls.
The meal plans that include
125 and 150 meals per semester
are factored into students' room
and board, while meal plans with
more meals are available at an
additional cost ranging from $135
to $530. For students not living
in the residence halls, meal plans
cost between $1,110 for 50 meals
and 500 blue bucks per semester
to $2,390 for the unlimited plus
plan.
"Although there might not be a
pure title to an expense for theft
or losing objects from the dining
hall, I feel like they might just
compensate for it by over-pricing
meals," Pithadia said.

4

4

SOLAR CAR
From Page 1A
three leading teams were neck and
neck despite various challenges,
according to Rackham student
Caitlin Sadler, a spokeswoman for
the University's team. Among the
difficulties was a brushfire that
stopped the race for half a day.
"All the teams had to stop and
spend the night wherever they
were," Sadler said.
The car, named Quantum, is
16 feet feet long and 37 inches in
height. It weighs 200 pounds less
than the team's previous model,
the 520-pound Infinium, estab-
lishing itself as the most aerody-
namic car produced by the team
to date.

Solar car driver Troy Halm, a
junior in the College of Engineer-
ing, said in a Michigan Engineering
video of the team in Australia that
he is proud of the team's finish.
"I'm feeling very good, very,
very happy the race is over, and I'm
relieved," Halm said. "I'm happy
with how we finished - not first -
but it's third, and we finished the
race, which is still excellent."
Halm also pointed to the brush-
fire as a challenge among others.
"We had a pretty interesting
last 100 kilometers," he said. "The
battery dropped a lot lower than
we expected, so we had to go pret-
ty slow."
Engineering and LSA senior
Rachel Kramer, another member
of the Solar Car Team, said in the
video that she had "mixed emo-

tions" about the team's finish.
"It's a lot of pride in first getting
ourselves here and then in com-
pleting the race, but also a little bit
of disappointment. I think every-
one is feeling that now," Kramer
said. "We came here to get more
than third and ended up with
third again. It's kind of our third
place curse."
But team members here in Ann
Arbor are already looking to the
future and are preparing for the
2013 competition.
"The team at home is always
focused on that two-year cycle,"
Sadler said. "We're already work-
ing on the 2013 car, and what it's
going to look like and they're also
going to prepare for the American
Solar Challenge, which is raced
this upcoming summer."

4

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RELEASE DATE- Friday, October 21, 2011
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis

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9 Bucks 4Be
14 Couples choice 5Co
15 Wells's upper- 6 In
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21 Connectiongizmo 11 Sa
23 Countrypro 12Ol
24 Big deer 13'6
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loaded with as
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38 roted 53 Procedures
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stockholders, familiarly
briefly 57 School sports
44 Juice regulatory org.
46 Conn. school 58 Pakistani
48 Disconcert language
50 Whence Roo? 60 Spice Girl Halliwell
51 Stable 61 Pluck
emanations 63 Sudden death
52 War adversaries cause
since the 70s 65 Pubicity
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
T A P S O U T DE EC L A W
S E RII I A L N OM I R A I S E
W H I N E D I N P R O T E S T
A R S ONS G U TS A U K
M A T T S P U NY K W A I
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W I N E D A N D D I N E D0
C E D A R S D I A S
D R A P E E G G Y P O R K
T E R A J A R S A I R E R
O L E K A R O O B L A D I
W I N D U P L O O S ,E E N D S
E V O N N E V E ST I G E S
R E T A G S E 0 A S N E R
xwordeditor@ao.com 10/20/11

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accuracy, say 5 6 a ss
70 Name meaning
"hairy"in Hebrew 57 BB
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DOWN
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lose's uTribuMeia Serie,n.

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