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October 21, 2011 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2011-10-21

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Ann Arbor, Michigan

Friday, October 21, 2011

michigandaily.com

INTERNATIONAL NEWS
'U' professors:
Libya's future
uncertain after
Gadhafi's death

Former Ambassador
Levitsky says
country will need
help rebuilding
By KAITLIN WILLIAMS
Daily Staff Reporter
Amid celebration and specula-
tion around the world yesterday,
members of the University com-
munity weighed in on the death
of former Libyan dictator Moam-
mar Gadhafi.
Gadhafi's death, which Libyan
officials announced yesterday,
was met with uncertainty about
the country's future and joy from
many Libyans and people around
the world. The former dictator's
death gives Libya a greater pos-
sibility of establishing a new gov-
ernment, University experts said,
though the country still faces
many challenges.
NATO airstrikes struck a fleet
of vehicles Gadhafi was report-
edly in while leaving the city of
Sirte yesterday. NATO's efforts
wounded Gadhafi and two of his
sons - Muatassim and Seif al-
Islam - in the French-led air raid
in Sirte. Following the raid, Liby-

an officials announced the deaths
of Gadhafi and Muatassim.
Gadhafi, who took over the
country after a military coup
in 1969, was overthrown in
an armed uprising against his
regime earlier
this year. office
Melvyn Lev-
itsky, former H 0 R S
U.S. ambassador
to Brazil and Bulgaria and a pro-
fessor in the Ford School of Pub-
lic Policy, said the United States's
support of a new Libyan govern-
ment will help move the country
forward in these trying times.
"There is no real government,"
Levitsky said. "Gadhafi didn't
leave many institutions in place.
They really have to pull them-
selves up by the bootstraps."
Levitsky said the U.S. military
was less involved than British and
French forces in NATO's efforts
to kill Gadhafi, but the U.S. will
likely aid Libya in its future con-
struction of governmental insti-
tutions and implementation of an
electoral process.
"Libya is a potentially rich
country," Levitsky said. "But,
they will need some help in insti-
tution building, and I think that's
where the United States and
See LIBYA, Page 6A

ADAM GLANZMAN/Daily
George Kropog and Runar Berg stand in Liberty Plaza yesterday to show their support for the Occupy Ann Arbor movement. Protesters at the third meeting of
the movement discussed its, challenges including safety of the encampment location and how participants will fare during the cold winter months.
Occupy Ann Arb Ior
discussescalne

o
ir

At third meeting, it's third general assembly in
raise Liberty Plaza last night, in which
participants raise a crowd of about 40 to 50 protes-
tors sprawled
concerns about out on wet A 6
winter area safety park benches
and ladled
soup into red 0
By ANDREW SCHULMAN Solo cups.
Daily StaffReporter A few par-
ticipants,
Occupy Ann Arbor - a faction braving the wind and cold, had
& the national movement striv- been there since last week, sleep-
ng for economic reform - held ing with donated blankets and

sleeping bags and cooking with
kitchenware and food provided
by the community. The condi-
tions within the encampment,
part of the Occupy Ann Arbor
movement but not directly orga-
nized by it, reflected the success-
es and challenges for the local
movement since it held its first
meeting on the Diag on Oct.6.
At yesterday's event, the
assembly formalized its decision-
making procedures, organized
a new committee for schedul-

ing and discussed local issues.
However, concerns remained,
including the movement's future
strength, the safety of the plaza
and the ability of the camp to
withstand the harsh Michigan
winter.
University alum Clare Levi-
joki, a member of Occupy Ann
Arbor's press committee, said
the movement's coordination
has improved since the group's
first meeting. She said the move-
See OCCUPY A2, Page 3A

i i :.. _

HOMEWARD BOUND

WOLVERINES ABROAD
'U' Solar Car Team places
third in World Challenge'

Sixteen team third place in the Veolia World
Solar Challenge on Thursday.
members race The solar car team from Tokai
University in Japan took first
in Australia place in the biennial competition,
in which solar car teams from
for competition around the world race 3,000 kilo-
meters across Australia, stretch-
By SABIRA KHAN ing from Darwin to Adelaide. The
Daily Staff Reporter Nuon Solar Car Team from the
Netherlands finished second.
After battling brush fires and The University's team has
desert heat for five days in the competed in the race five times
Australian Outback, the Univer- and has never placed higher
sity's Solar Car Team finished in than third. The 16 members of

the team took the semester off to
participate in the race. The team
finished the car six months in
advance, which allowed members
to conduct extensive tests before
sending it to Australia.
The teams raced during the
day and camped outside every
night at 5 p.m., pausing only for
periodic control stops. Each team
was accompanied by a race offi-
cial to ensure they followed the
rules.
Halfway through the race, the
See SOLAR CAR, Page 6A

ADAM GIANZMAN/Daiily~ Mote photos at
The Rall family adopts a lab mix at the Huron Valley Humane Society yesterday. Due to over- M
crowding, prices on select dogs and cats have decreased in hopes of spurring more adoptions. g
UNIVERSITY HOUSING
Stolen dishes, cutlery taken from dining
halls cost 'U' $40,000 each year to replace

SPEAKERS ON CAMPUS
'U' alum Sara Fitzgerald promotes
book on feminist political leader

Amount factored
into room and
board, not tuition
By JENNIFER LEE
Daily Staff Reporter
Students sneaking royal blue
cups, multicolored bowls and
the occasional fork or spoon out
of campus dining halls do not

necessarily consider themselves
thieves. In fact, most students
guilty of dishware theft feel
they're taking what they've paid
for.
The commonly held belief
among students that stolen din-
ing hall dishware is reimbursed
to the University through tuition
fees is a myth, according to Uni-
versity Housing spokesman
Peter Logan.
Tuition, which is primarily

based on credit hours and state
residency, has no connection to
room and board charges, Logan
said. Furthermore, additional
fees students pay, including
miscellaneous charges like the
$1.5 allocated to each student's
school or college government, do
not include a charge for missing
dishes.
Logan said missing plates,
cups, bowls, mugs and silver-
See DINING, Page 6A

New book
explores life of
Elly Peterson
By CHARLENE LERNER
For the Daily
While finishing her senior the-
sis at the University in 1973, Sara
Fitzgerald, The Michigan Daily's
first female editor in chief and

former editor at The Washington
Post, spent much of her time in
the stacks of the Harlan Hatcher
Graduate Library.
At an event last night, Fitzger-
ald returned to the library. But
this time, it was to promote the
release of her new book, "Elly
Peterson: 'Mother' of the Moder-
ates."
Fitzgerald's book was pub-
lished by The University of
Michigan Press earlier this year

and follows the political career
of Elly Peterson, the late feminist
who served as the first woman to
chair the Michigan Republican
Party. Fitzgerald said writing
the book was important to raise
awareness about an influential
figure in the women's rights
movement.
"I think it speaks to the con-
tinuing importance of studying
women's history as well as the
See FEMINIST, Page 6A

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INDEX AP NEW S ....................3A NEW S-.........................6A
Vol. CXXI I, No. 32 OPINION .....................4A SPORTS --.....................7A
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