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October 20, 2011 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2011-10-20

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l N H l UN \\ E WNI T DIT A) 1 \l 11 DOM

Ann Arbor, Michiganv

Thursday, October 20,2011

michigandaily.com

THE BANK COMES TO BLAU

UNIVERSITY ENROLLMENT
'U' student
enrollment
at highest
number

TERESA MATHEW/Daily
Robert Zoellick, president of the World Bank Group, speaks in Blau Auditorium at the Ross School of Business for the 2011 Citigroup Foundation Lecture Series
yesterday. Zoellick spoke about the debt crisis and the bank's plan to help solve it. >>See page 7A for the full story.
UNIVERSITY HOSPITA L
. . Ot 1ren s OS ia
C.S. Mol Childed ns Hospi
opening delayed until1 Dec. 4

Freshmen minority
enrollment remains
stable at 10.5
percent this year
By JOSEPH LICHTERMAN
DailyNewsEditor
University enrollment is at an
all-time high despite a smaller
incoming freshman class than
last year,
accord- Michigan Daily
log to data EXCLUSIVE
released by
the Univer-
sity's Office of the Registrar this
morning.
For the third-straight year,
the University's student popu-
lation has grown to its largest
size ever with 42,716 students
enrolled this semester, up from
41,924 students last fall. The
growth can be attributed to a
2.8-percent increase in gradu-
ate students and a 1.4-percent
increase in undergraduates.
At 6,251 students, this year's
freshman class is about 3.8-per-
cent smaller than last year's
class of 6,496 students. The Uni-

versity also received its largest
number of freshman applicants
ever - a 25-percent increase
from the 2009-2010 application
cycle, which is attributed to the
University's switch to the Com-
mon Application last year.
Last year, the Universityen-
rolled a freshman class larger
than projected numbers. This
See ENROLLMENT.Page7A

Postponement
* due to fire safety
regulations
By MICHELE NAROV
Daily StaffReporter
The University of Michigan
Health System's newly con-
structed C.S. Mott Children's
Hospital and Von Voigtlander
Women's Hospital will open

its doors to patients later than
anticipated.
Though the hospital will be
open for special events start-
ing Nov. 1, the beginning of
patient care - originally slated
for mid-November - has been
rescheduled to Dec. 4. Pat War-
ner, executive director of the
new hospital, explained that
the delay stems from fire safety
regulations and complications
with obtaining the building's
occupancy license, which forced

administrators to revise the
training. schedule for hospital
employees.
"We have 6,000 staff to ori-
ent, train and get familiar with
the building," Warner said. "We
thought that we'd be able to get
multiple faculty and staff in for
that training earlier, starting
this summer."
She added that the state's fire
marshal declared that no more
than 50 people - not including
construction workers - could

be inside of the building at the
same time prior to the hospital's
opening. The fire marshal made
the decision based on the build-
ing's size and lack of adequate
fire alarms. Additionally, the
fire marshal recommended that
any group in the building should
stay on the same floor in the
same unit to maximize safety.
While the complex was
scheduled to open Nov. 13, War-
ner said the new facility will
See HOSPITAL, Page 7A

UNIVE RSIT Y T ECHNOLO GY
MCommunity's group
security settings changed farmers ma t

ITS makes switch in
response to student
concerns
By RAYZA GOLDSMITH
Daily StaffReporter
In response to concerns from
students and faculty members
about the lack of privacy settings
on the University's new online
directory, MCommunity, the

University's Information Tech-
nology Services made a portion
of the website more secure.
On Saturday, ITS eliminated
the "Groups" tab, which previ-
ously allowed MCommunity
users to view other users' group
memberships. With the change,
users can still see their own
groups when logged in, but they
can only view basic informa-
tion on others users' profiles.
ITS also, removed the feature
allowing individuals to search

for groups that contain a specific
person.
Holly Nielsen, ITS interim
executive director of applica-
tion and information services,
said ITS made the change to
MCommunity - which was
launched on July 17 - after
students and faculty members
complained about the website's
lax regard of their privacy. At
a Senate Advisory Committee
on University Affairs meet-
See MCOMMUNITY, Page 7A

COMMUNITY COLLEGES
Number of community college transfer
students to the 'U' at highest in six years

1,016 community
college students
came to 'U,' up 60
from last year
By CHELSEA LANDRY
Daily StaffReporter
Though community college
enrollment across the state
is fluctuating, the number of

community college transfer
students enrolling at the Uni-
versity is at an all-time high.
Dilip Das, the University's
assistant vice provost for aca-
demic affairs, said the number
of community college transfer
students at the University is the
highest in the past six years, up
by 60 students from last year.
However, at community colleg-
es across the state, numbers are
varying from large increases to
slight decreases.

Of the 1,016 community col-
lege transfer students at the
University of Michigan this
year, approximately 120-150
transferred from Washtenaw
Community College, according
to Das.
The University works close-
ly with Washtenaw Commu-
nity College through a special
recruiting program with the
college called Michigan-Pursu-
ing Our Dreams, or M-POD. As
See TRANSFER, Page 7A

Patrons walk throughout the Ann Arbor Farmers Market in Kerrytown last week.
Federal grant to provide boost for
Southeast Michigan farm start-ups
Food System Southeast Michigan may result in Michigan. The funding will
to more farms popping up in be used to purchase a tractor,
Economic the region and a greater variety baler, heated greenhouse and
of vegetables at local farmers' other farm implements for the
Partnership to markets. Tilian Farm Development Cen-
. 8 The organization, the Food ter - a 153-acre plot farm incu-
receive $91,840 System Economic Partner- bator on the outskirts of Ann
ship, will receive $91,840 Arbor Township.
By ANDREW SCHULMAN from the U.S. Department of The investments will allow
Daily StaffReporter Agriculture's Farmers Mar- Tilian to expand its incubation
ket Promotion Program. The of farm start-ups with the hope
A five-digit federal grant . grant, which was announced that they will spur economic
to a nonprofit focused on sus- on Oct. 13, is the largest of the growth for sustainable agri-
tainable food development in nine grants allocated to cities See FARM, Page 7A

4mk

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