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6 - October 14, 2011

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

FINANCES
From Page 1
Technology Startups, which
will invest up to $25 million in
University start-up businesses
over the next decade. He added
he is confident that returns on
the University's investment
in start-up companies will be
lucrative.
"There's a lot of good things
about the initiative," Lundberg
said, "but for me, it had to over-
come the hurdle of being able
to justify taking risks with the
endowment money."
YOST ICE ARENA PROJECT
BACKED BY REGENTS
The regents approved the
schematic design and funding to

improve seating and fan ameni-
ties at Yost Ice Arena.
Slottow said during the meet-
ing that this part of the project
must be approved to ensure that
construction doesn't interfere
with the hockey season and fin-
ishes by the fall 2012 deadline.
"We are requesting your
approval of the schematic
design and also to go out (and)
to (solicit) bids with some early
procurement packages to fit this
aggressive schedule," Slottow
said.
The regents were shown ren-
derings of the proposed renova-
tion, which includes additional
accessible seating for people with
disabilities, more concession
stands and a new press box. At
their June meeting, the regents
approved the $14.7 million reno-
vation of the 88-year-old build-

LABORATORY TO BE
HOUSED IN NEW HOSPITAL
The regents gave the green
light to finish the 11th floor of
the new C.S. Mott Children's and
Von Voigtlander Women's Hos-
pital as a cardiac catheterization
laboratory. The hospital is sched-
uled to open in November.
The laboratory project -
estimated to cost $3.45 million
- will be funded by the Univer-
sity of Michigan Hospitals and
Health Centers' resources.
In an interview after the meet-
ing, Slottow explained that some
space in the hospital had been
left unfinished to accommodate
for future needs that may arise.
He said he hadn't anticipated the
need for a cardiac catheteriza-

tion lab so quickly, but trends
show that a pediatric unit in the
lab is necessary.
REGENTS APPROVE
POWER PLANT UPDATE
The University's Central
Power Plant, which allocates
power to Central Campus, will
receive an update to its control
system after the regents passed a
$6.75 million upgrade.
At the meeting, Slottow said
the project will revamp the Cen-
tral Power Plant's system, which
heats and cools much of the cam-
pus. The project is scheduled to
be completed in fall 2014.
HONORARY DEGREE
RECIPIENTS APPROVED
The regents heard the recom-

mendations and approved hon-
orary degrees to be awarded at
Winter Commencement to four
people in a variety of fields.
University President Mary
Sue Coleman read the nomina-
tions for honorary degrees. Jill
Abramson, executive editor of
The New York Times, will give
the keynote address at the com-
mencement ceremony on Dec. 18
at Crisler Arena. Abramson will
also receive an honorary Doctor-
ate of Humane Letters.
Coleman said Abramson is
a compelling candidate for the
degree because she serves on
the board of directors of the
Knight-Wallace Fellowship at
the University. Knight-Wallace
fellows are professional jour-
nalists who are given a grant
to study at the University for a
one-year period.

Coleman added that
Abramson represents powerful,
professional women as the first
female executive editor of the
Times - a position she assumed
Sept. 6.
"We are very excited that she
is going to be our commence-
ment speaker," Coleman said.
Nancy Cantor, chancellor
of Syracuse University, will
receive an honorary Doctor of
Laws degree at the ceremony.
Leslie Benet, professor of bio-
pharmaceutical sciences and
pharmaceutical chemistry at
the University of California, San
Francisco, and Robert Putnam,
the Peter and Isabel Malkin
professor of public policy in the
John F. Kennedy School of Gov-
ernment at Harvard University,
will each receive an honorary
Doctorate of Science degree.

4
4

FILM
From Page 1
Kazmirzack added that the
new program saves taxpay-
ers money and gives the Film
Office the ability to negotiate the
appropriations it doles out.
Michelle Begnoche, spokes-
woman for the Michigan Film
Office, said the office cannot
start accepting applications and

distributing money until state
legislators define the parameters
that films can use the grants for.
Though the office's new budget
is 78 percent lower than last year,
Begnoche said the transition to
a smaller budget is manageable
because the office had an "unof-
ficial cap" on spending in 2011.
"Under the tax credit system,
there is no cap," Begnoche said.
"However, when the governor
made his budget proposal, his

directive to our office was that
we work within $25 million (in
2011). So we've already been
doing this for a year."
Even with a significantly
smaller budget, the office has not
seen a drop in film applications.
Begnoche said the Film Office
has already approved 21 projects
to be filmed next year, and she
isn't concerned that filmmakers
will stop coming to the state.
"Anytime you have $25 million

to offer to folks, there are people
that are interested," Begnoche
said. "Our goal is finding the best
projects and attracting the best
projects in Michigan."
Over the summer, students
and Ann Arbor residents were
star struck with frequent sight-
ings of actor Jason Segel and
actress Emily Blunt, who were in.
town for the filming of the movie
"The Five-Year Engagement,"
that will premier in 2012. Earlier

this year, actors George Clooney
and Ryan Gosling made appear-
ances in Ann Arbor to film the
recently released "The Ides of
March."
Though the Michigan Legisla-
ture passed the state budget ear-
lier this year, disagreement over
the impact of the reduced Film
Office budget remains.
State Rep. Jeff Irwin (D-
Ann Arbor), who supported the
film tax credits, said the addi-

tional job creation and spend-
ing brought on by increased film
production in the state provid-
ed much-needed assistance to
Michigan's economy.
"We saw a tremendous amount
of (economic) activity in Ann
Arbor and Washtenaw County,"
Irwin said. "The biggest impact
is going to be hotels and restau-
rants because they were seeing
a tremendous (increase) in busi-
ness due to the tax credits."

SOPHOMORE
From Page 1
tions like juniors and seniors.
"You've got these two big
clusters of opportunities for stu-
dents, and we do have a little bit
of a gap in relation to the kind of
programming we do for sopho-
mores," he said.
Sophomore Initiative has
three primary components: aca-
demic work, internship help and
experiential learning. The pro-
gram offers academic classes and
seminars catered specifically to
the needs of sophomores and has
also partnered with the Career
Center to better prepare LSA
students for internships.
Additionally, the Sophomore
Initiative program provides a
number of learning opportuni-
ties for LSA students to experi-
ence real workenvironments and

apply their liberal arts education.
Deloria said sophomore year is a
critical year in terms of choosing
a concentration, and the Sopho-
more Initiative helps to point stu-
dents in the right direction.
"We wanted to create a couple
of classes where students could
see the college and could see a
wide range of opportunities and
possibilities in a really short,
compressed period of time,"
Deloria said.
LSA sophomore Maxwell
Salvatore said he took the class
"Twenty Two Ways to Think
About Food" to help him narrow
down his concentration choices.
"I'm currently undecided, and
I thought this class was kind of
like my last chance to, you know,
get a little taste of all sorts of dis-
ciplines that are available," Sal-
vatore said. "I think it's given me
a little bit of an idea of the kind of
things that I want to do. It's cer-

tainly given me a taste of things I
don't want to do."
Salvatore participated in the
two-day food stamps challenge
and ate off $8.60 over the course
of 48 hours. During this period,
Salvatore said one of the most
important things he realized is
the importance of planning out
meals.
"As long as you really do plan,
and you don't mind cooking your
own meals, I mean it's pretty
manageable in terms of eat-
ing a variety of foods and cheap
foods," he said.
Salvatore added that he did
get hungry on the first night
and during the second day of
the experiment. However, he
said the experience wasn't long
enough to determine whether
he could actually live off food
stamps. Ultimately, Salvatore
said he was glad he participated
in the challenge.

LSA sophomore Caroline
Schiff, who is also in Deloria's
class, wrote in an e-mail inter-
view that she and her friends
combined their money so they
could buy food in bulk.
"We had to make some sac-
rifices, such as buying grape
jelly instead of strawberry, so
we could save those extra 20
cents," Schiff wrote. "However,
we managed to buy a sufficient
amount of food for six meals."
She added that because of the
budget constraint, she had to eat
cheap, unhealthy food that she
usually tries to avoid.
"I prefer to eat healthy, fresh
food, which is usually more
expensive," Schiff wrote. "I also
felt more lethargic throughout
the day due to the quality of food
I was consuming."
The class that administered
the experiment features guest
lecturers from different depart-

ments within LSA, and each
guest offers a perspective on
food in relation to their areas of
study including history, political
science, physics and economics.
Schiff, said in a separate
interview that even though she
has already declared her major,
she still thought she could gain
something from the class.
"I kind of wanted a class that
was different from my major and
anything I've ever taken," Schiff
said. "I like how there's a differ-
ent lecturer every class and how
they give a different perspective
on food."
Though LSA is a liberal arts
institution, Deloria said many
students don't get the full ben-
efit of liberal arts program-
ming because they are often too
focused on finding a concentra-
tion. One of the objectives of the
Sophomore Initiative, he said, is
to help students understand the

benefits of having a liberal arts
education.
"We wanted to sort of have
some courses where we tried to
prepare students better to sort
of say, you know, 'Here's who I
am, here's what I did while I was
here, here's how it translates into
my success,"' Deloria said.
Margot Finn, a lecturer I
in American Culture, is also
teaching a Sophomore Initiative
class about food titled, "Much
Depends Upon Dinner." Finn
said looking at food from a mul-
tidisciplinary perspective is an
effective window into different
fields of study. She describes her
class as a food studies course,
which examines food from a cul-
tural perspective.
"What's interesting to me
about food is that it's both
incredibly personal, and we
interact with it on a daily basis,"
Finn said.

4

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