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October 13, 2011 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2011-10-13

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O N )HD)EWENTY TW( )EA F() LI T111AL FREE()M

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Thursday, October 13, 2011

m

ichigandaily.com

LOCAL BUSINESSES
Publishers
try to recover
from closure of
Borders Inc.

Local publisher:
Closing was a
'wake-up call' to
the book industry
By ADAM RUBENFIRE
Daily Staff Reporter
The closure of Borders last
month left physical and figura-
tive holes across the country.
The company's closing not
only led to 399
store vacancies
nationwide, but
it also put a large j
financial burden 0
on the publish- ,
ing industry.
Several pub-
lishing companies in the region
have experienced the effects of
the bookstore chain's closure
on the industry and individual
businesses. Despite losing one
of their main customers, the
publishers are confident they'll
bounce back from the loss.
David Swan, sales director at
Chelsea, Mich.-based publishing
company Sleeping Bear Press,
said while it is too earlyto deter-
mine the publisher's monetary
losses due to Borders closing, the
publishing industry has lost a

significant number of dedicated
workers.
"Borders had some really fine
booksellers and book advocates,"
Swan said. "Losing them and
knowing that the market is tight
for places for them to find work is
a great loss to the culture - the
book culture."
The once-flourishing book
chain announced its liquida-
tion on July 18 and subsequently
closed its flagship location at 612
East Liberty St. on Sept. 9.
Though the Borders closure
has put a dent in the industry,
Swan said Sleeping Bear Press
has long had strong relationships
with independent bookstores
and hopes former Borders cus-
tomers will continue to buy their
books through alternative sell-
ers.
"It's heartening to see that a
number of independent book-
stores have opened since Borders
has closed its doors," Swan said,
specifically referring to a group
of Borders employees in Cali-
fornia who bought their former
place of employment and are in
the process of openingtheir own
bookstore.
When asked whether he
thinks independent bookstores
will thrive in a post-Borders
market, Swan said he has confi-
See PUBLISHERS, Page SA

Yousef Rabhi, a commissioner on the Washtenaw County Board of Commissioners, addresses the crowd at a rally supporting University of Michigan Health
System nurses yesterday. Hundreds of nurses and supporters took part in the march that started at Liberty Plaza and ended at the University Hospital.
Nurses march through
A 2 demandin g contract

b(

LJMHS nurses. contract.
Represented by the state-
request better wide union, the Michigan
Nurses Association, UMHS
enefits, salaries nurses - who have been with-
out a contract since June 30
By STEVE ZOSKI - were joined by hundreds of
For the Daily supporters at a rally that start-
ed at Liberty Plaza on East Lib-
owds of shouting people erty Street yesterday afternoon
ed in red marched through and ended with picketing in
Arbor streets yesterday, as front of the University Hospi-
ersity of Michigan Health tal.
em nurses and their sup- Complaints from the UMHS
ers rallied for a finalized nurses gained attention this

summer when MNA filed a
grievance with the state against
the health system for violat-
ing state law and collective
bargaining rights. The nurses
are angered by what they see
as unreasonable concessions
such as cuts to benefits, over-
time limitations, reductions in
paid time off and an increase in
health insurance costs.
At yesterday's rally, officers
from the University's Depart-
ment of Public Safety stood
guard in front of the hospital as

on-the-clock hospital workers
banged windows and cheered
from inside while employees
off duty came out in full force.
Addressing the crowd, Katie
Oppenheim, president of the
University of Michigan Profes-
sional Nurse Council, accused
the University administration
of being inconsiderate of the
University's nurses.
"It seems a bit strange that
the University of Michigan
and its administration are so
See NURSES, Page SA

Cr
deck
Ann,
Univ
Syste
port

TO INFINITY AND... THE DIAG

STUDENT START-UPS
TechArb accelerator taking on
more student entrepreneurs

Incubator to host
20 student teams in
new, larger space
By ALYSSA ADLER
Daily StaffReporter
Student entrepreneurs look-
ing to develop start-ups won't
have to look further than The
Offices at Liberty Square - the
new home of the TechArb Stu-
dent Startup Accelerator.
After moving into the larg-

er space on East Washington
Street, TechArb is preparing to
take on about 20 student busi-
ness teams in addition to the
several returning groups. In
addition to increasing the num-
ber of students, the accelerator is
expanding its contacts.
"This year, we willbe bringing
in more partners (venture capi-
talists, alumni, local and national
business leaders) to connect help
support ventures to scale and
grow," Moses Lee, an adjunct
assistant professor at the Center
for Entrepreneurship who helps

to manage TechArb, wrote in an
e-mail interview.
Founded in 2009, TechArb
is the product of a collabora-
tion between the University's
Center for Entrepreneurship,
the Office of the Vice President
for Research and the Samuel
Zell & Robert H. Lurie Institute
for Entrepreneurial Studies. Its
goal is to help student entrepre-
neurs pursue their start-tpid s
and reach their businesses' full
potential - whether that be fur-
thering their research for their
See TECHARB, Page 3A

LSA freshman Stacey Ervin, a gymnast on the men's varsity team, demonstrates his skills yesterday on the iag.
UNIVERSITY HOUSING
Dining halSl golgtrayl'eSS

UN1VERSITY RESEARCH
'U' researchers identify molecule that
causes rapid movement of cancer cells

Initiative part of
new sustainability
goals at the 'U'
By PAIGE PEARCY
Daily StaffReporter
On any given day, dining hall
trays are piled high with pizza,
macaroni and cheese, salad,
soda, cereal, softserve and choc-

olate chip cookies. But much of
this food often ends up in the
trash.
To combat this waste prob-
lem, the University is making a
push for trayless dining in cam-
pus residence halls. The initia-
tive - that started as a trial in
East Quad Dining Hall last year
- has been implemented in the
Betsy Barbour Dining Hall, will
soon be in place at Twigs Dining
Hall at Oxford Housing and will

officially be part of East Quad
Residence Hall dining in fall
2013.
The efforts are part of the
University's 14-year plan for a
greener campus, which Univer-
sity President Mary Sue Cole-
man announced on Sept. 27. All
future dining halls being built or
remodeled will incorporate the
trayless dining concept.
"Using a tray often means
See TRAYLESS, Page SA

Cancer Center
awarded $3.5M to
study stem cells
By MARY HANNAHAN
Daily Staff Reporter
More than 40,000 Americans
are projected to die of breast
cancer this year, but researchers

at the University's Comprehen-
sive Cancer Center are working
on ways to decrease this num-
ber.
Sofia Merajver, professor
of internal medicine and epi-
demiology and director of the
University's Center for Global
Health, was the lead research-
er of a study that identified
the molecule that causes rapid
movement of a cancer cell and

the importance of disrupting
the molecule to fight cancerous
ce emoe. l
The molecule, called
p38-gamma, controls the struc-
ture of the cytoskeleton of the
cell and ultimately influences
how the cell moves. A cancer
cell's cytoskeleton is typically
arranged in bundles of fibers
that make the cell move quickly.
See RESEARCH, Page 3A

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