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October 12, 2011 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 2011-10-12

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6A - Wednesday, October 12 2011

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

COUZENS
From Page 1A
Life Initiatives has undertaken
a number of projects to improve
residence halls. One of the initia-
tives includes the North Quad
Residential and Academic Com-
plex that opened last fall and cost

about $175 million to build. Stock-
well and Mosher-Jordan resi-
dence hall were also renovated
in recent years at a cost of $39.6
million and $44.1 million, respec-
tively. Additionally, renovations
are underway at Alice Lloyd Resi-
dence Hall, and East Quad Resi-
dence Hall will be revamped next
school year.

Coleman talked about how
each residence hall has its own
character and praised the renova-
tions for retaining "the best tradi-
tion of Michigan." She added that
the older University buildings are
well constructed, but they need
to be renovated to meet students'
changing needs.
"They needed updating, they

needed to be modernized, they
needed the latest in technology
because (that's) the way our stu-
dents learn today," Coleman said.
"And so it's a thrill for us to keep
the infrastructure, keep the beau-
tiful parts of the building and yet
make them as modern as any new
building could be."
Engineering senior Ricqel

Smith lived in Couzens before the
renovations and now serves as a
peer academic success special-
ist in the building. Smith said she
was shocked and impressed by
the new facility.
"It definitely was mind blowing
" Smith said. "Looking from the
outside, it doesn't look like they
changed anything, but when you

walk in it's just like this modern-
ized, wonderful building."
Smith added that, she has
already noticed students taking
advantage of the building's ame-
nities.
"Before, you fought over one
study lounge, and now there's just
so many options to choose from,"
she said.

0

BLOOD BANK
From Page 1A
practice," Kardia said. "People
should know when they're being
a part of research."
LSS Assistant Director Dan-
iel Thiel said students should be
aware of the option to give their
blood for research, especially
because it is not a widely dis-
cussed issue. LSS's mission is to
promote education, research and
community engagement in areas
related to the life sciences. A part
of that mission is to educate the

public about what people can do
with their blood samples.
"We're concerned about the
way that the public perceives the
way that science moves forward,
and we're also concerned about
making sure that science is done
in an ethical manner," Thiel said.
"We're interested in educating
the public about it and also look-
ing and testing new ways to think
about what consent means for a
large biobank like this."
The blood is initially collected
for the newborn screening test,
which is a test required by the
state that screens for 49 disor-

ders that would require early
treatment. Because the test is
required by state law, no parental
consent is necessary. According
to the Michigan Department of
Community Health, the newborn
screening test finds more than
200 babies born in Michigan each
year have one of the listed disor-
ders.
When the blood is collected
from newborns, leftover dime-
sized samples are placed on paper
cards, which are then stored in
the BioTrust. When the samples
are moved to the bank, they are
unidentified so that no personal

information is attached to them.
At town hall meetings and
other discussions LSS has held,
Thiel said people ask many ques-
tions to understand the logistics
of the program and why research-
ers are asking permission to
use the blood now when it isn't
required for the newborn screen-
ing test.
"One of the big things that
we've seen is confusion between
the newborn screening program
and the BioTrust research which
is really separate," Thiel said.
"(The research is) after the new-
born screening is over."

In 2010, LSS received a five-
year National Institutes of Health
grant that it plans to use to lead
discussions to see what the public
thinks about the ethics involved
with the BioTrust.
Kardia has been doing genetic
research and said the BioTrust
blood is a valuable resource.
"I think it's a really unique
opportunity because there's no
other resource in the United
States that actually has every
single person in a state-born in
that state-curated for potential
research," Kardia said. "Every-
thing else is biased by the way

we sample it when we do the
research."
However, even though no con-
sent is required for the blood to
be used, Kardia said it is impor-
tant for the researchers to ask.
As a researcher, Kardia could use
the blood to further her stud-
ies, but as a mother, she said
she understands why consent is
important.
"I'm a geneticist, and genetic
information is awfully person-
al," Kardia said. "I don't want
to do genetic studies on people
who don't know I'm doing those
genetic studies."

I

4

THIS & THAT
From Page 1A
that needs to be addressed. Russ
Collins, executive director of
the Michigan Theater, hired a
security guard for the area in
part because of the panhandling.
However, he added that the hir-
ing was not out of the ordinary.
"(Panhandling) is part of the
downtown landscape," Collins
said.
Collins also went to other busi-
nesses on East Liberty asking for
financial contributions to help
pay for the security guard. But
Graef said This & That did not
help cover the costs because the
security guard was for the graf-
fiti alley, which This & That isn't

directly next to.
"The panhandling that was
bothering one was the stuff in
front of my store, so I'm not
inclined to pay someone to help
for a security guard," Graef said.
Ann Arbor City Council mem-
ber Sabra Briere (D-Ward 1) said
though she doesn't think pan-
handling is causing poor sales in
the area, increased panhandling
is a problem that needs to be
addressed. But she said, regret-
fully, the city does not have
enough funds to hire more police
officers at this time.
"We don't have a lot of flex-
ibility when it comes to spending
money for either providing ser-
vices to people who are homeless
or for putting more police on the
street," Briere said.

City Council recently request-
ed a grant of federal funds given
to the state of Michigan to hire
more police officers. The city is
also working to develop different
staffing methods to station more
current officers in the downtown
area.
Though Collins said he couldn't
determine if there has recently
been an increased number of
panhandlers on East Liberty, he
believes the issue is exaggerated
by the media.
"(The coverage) plays on peo-
ple's fears and anxieties," he said.
Other stores in the area are
also slated to close soon. Graef's
announcement comes 10 days
after Poshh owner Wendy-Batiste
Johnson said her clothing bou-
tique on East Liberty is expected

to close on Oct. 30.
Graef cited the closing of
Borders as a major catalyst in
decreasing foot traffic and sales
on East Liberty.
"When I did my business plan,
(Borders) had 7,000 people on
average a week through their
doors - those people are gone,"
Graef said. "It's going to impact
an area."
She added that the increase
in corporate franchises, such as
CVS, in the area has impacted
local business, since independent
stores like hers aren't able to com-
pete with corporate competition.
Graef said the personal and
unique experience independent
businesses in Ann Arbor create
for customers is lost when corpo-
rate businesses move in.

"The beauty of Ann Arbor is
that everything was indepen-
dent," she said.
For Graef, closing her store isn't
easy. She said opening This & That
was a dream of hers and was very
rewarding, even with the strug-
gles she faced. She added that
leaving her loyal customer base
will be difficult, but she knows the
store cannot remain open.
"I've had alot of great support,
a lot of people coming to see me
these last few weeks and telling
me that they're very sad ... so that
makes me feel good and bad at the
same time," Graef said. "I feel like
I've let the community down by
closing, but there's only so much
you can do if the sales are not
coming in to support the store."
With no current plans to

reopen in the future, Graef said
everything in the store, including
the candy supply, has to be sold.
Graef added that she hopes the
area and economy will rebound,
allowing another independent
business owner to have a mean-
ingful experience opening and
their own store.
"I think it will turn around ...
I mean, I'm an optimist on that.
I have high hopes for it," Graef
said. "Someone else will-move in,
someone else will try something.
That's the nature of small busi-
nesses - someone keeps trying
their dreams, so we'll see."
- Daily Staff Reporter
Chelsea Landry, Benjamin
Seidman and Dana Delvecchio
contributed to this article.

I

4

NYT
From Page 1A
Though Conlin said she didn't
use her 2002 profile to guide the
new article, there are several over-
laps between the two pieces. Ann
Arbor restaurants such as Zinger-
man's, Dominick's and Angelo's
were included in both articles.

Events like the Farmers Market
in Kerrytown and Football Satur-
days also made each article, as did
picturesque campus spots like the
Diag and Law Quad.
Mary Kerr, president and CEO
of the Ann Arbor Area Convention
and Visitors Bureau, said the arti-
cle "is absolutely huge" and wrote
in a separate e-mail interview that
it has the potential to draw visitors

to Ann Arbor and help boost the
local economy.
"It gives us national publicity
as a great place to visit and a great
weekend destination," Kerr said.
While the article didn't turn
Ann Arbor into a tourist hotspot
overnight, the story has affected
some of the businesses mentioned,
including Angelo's on Catherine
Street.

"We had a few people mention
it to us," said Angelo's owner Steve
Vangelatos. "A lot of people read
The New York Times. They notice
it, and they mention it."
Another business written about
in the article, Mark's Carts - an
open-air collection of food carts
located on West Washington
Street that opened in May - has
also been featured ip other nation-

al publications including the Chi-
cago Tribune which wrote about
it last week. Despite the public-
ity of the courtyard, Marks Carts
owner Mark Hodesh said the carts
haven't yet achieved a big student
following.
"I don't get the sense that peo-
ple come in droves from campus,
eat and go back," Hodesh said.
Originally, Conlin wanted to

include more attractions, but had
to exclude some famous locales
such as Blimpie Burger, Fleetwood
Diner and the Blind Pig. Conlin
said she hoped to say more about
the city in the article, but "there's
only a certain amount of space."
And with only 36 hours,
Conlin said, "You're actually
supposed to come up with (a
realistic) itinerary."

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RELEASE DATE- Wednesday, October 12, 2011
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis

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opcibn DOWN 38 Start
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gal 9 Vital sign S E D
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