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October 11, 2011 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2011-10-11

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i.

4

2A - Tuesday, October 11, 2011

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

2A - Tuesday, October 11, 2011 The Michigan Daily - michigandailycom

1We Idiig0an aily
420 Maynard St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1327
www.michigandaily.com
STEPHANIESTEINBERG ZACH YANCER
Editor in Chief Business Manager
734-418-4115 ext. 1251 734-418-4115 ext. 1241
steinberg@michigandaily.com zyancer@michigandaily.com

I

Daily editor beaten at civil rights protest

50 years ago this week
(Oct. 12,1961): Tom Hayden,
a former Michigan Daily edi-
tor in chief at the time, was
dragged from his car and
beatenwhile drivingby acivil
rights protest in McComb,
Miss.
About 100 students were
marching past the car after
walking out from Burgland
Negro High School because
the school wanted them to
sign forms pledging to not
participate in civil rights pro-
tests. The Associated Press
reported at the time that the
assailant was a local plumber.
Paul Potter, an officer of
the National Student Asso-

ciation, and Hayden were
driving to City Hall with a
police escort. But, ina Michi-
gan Daily article, Hayden
said police refused to protect
them and drove away as the
incident happened. ,.
Hayden said the chief of
police told him that the police
"couldn't protect outside agi-
tators, especially whites."
35 year ago this week
(Oct. 14, 1976): Univer-
sity Prof. James Harris
announced that he identified
the mummy of Queen Tiy.
Queen Tiy, the favorite
wife of Amenhotep III, lived
during the ancient eighteenth
Egyptian dynasty. A piece

of Tiy's hair - found in King
Tut's tomb - was critical to
identifying the mummy.
"(This is) the greatest
find since the discovery of
the tomb of King Tut-Ank-
Amon," Harris told the Daily
atthe time.
20 years ago this week
(Oct. 10, 1991): Sigma Kappa
sorority filed a lawsuit
against the city of Ann Arbor
after the Ann Arbor Plan-
ning Commission forbade the
sorority from adding an addi-
tion to its house.
The sorority applied for
a "special exception use"
permit, but the commission
declined the request after

hearing complaints from
local residents. MonikaSacks,
the sorority's attorney at the m
time, said Ann Arbor's zoning
restrictions were inherently
unfair for sororities and fra-
ternities.
"The city treats Greeks
quite differently from other
uses," she told the Daily at a
the time. "You could plop a
homeless shelter down in the
area without getting special
exception ... No matter where
(Greek houses) are, they're
required to get special excep-
tion use."
FILE PHOTO/D;
- JOSEPH LICTHERMAN Former Daily Editor Tom Hayden
ANDCAITLINHUSTON shields himself from an attacker.

Newsroom
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Corrections
corrections@michigandaily.com
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Sports Section
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News Tips
news@michigandaily.com
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'Editorial Pate
opinion@michigandailyeem
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Finance
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4

CRIME NOTES

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES
Award-winning Dinner and

Little man lost
in the Big House
WHERE: Michigan
Stadium
WHEN: Sunday at about
9:30 a.m.
WHAT: A young child was
separated from his family
members during an event,
University Police reported.
The boy was later reunited
with his family.
Permit to steal
WHERE: Hubbard Street
parkinglot
WHEN: Friday at about
12:35 p.m.
WHAT: A parking permit
was taken from an unlocked
vehicle between Sept. 30
and Oct. 6, University Police
reported. There are no sus-
pects.

You snooze,

you lose cash choir show a movie

WHERE: Thompson Street
WHEN: Saturday at about
1:30 p.m.
WHAT: Cash and personal
items were taken from a
house while two University
students were sleeping,
University Police reported.
There were no signs of,
forced entry, and there are
no suspects.
Who's got mail?
WHERE: West Quadrangle
Residence Hall
WHEN: Friday at about 9
a.m.
WHAT: Some mail is either
missing or was stolen from
a resident, University Police
reported. An initial report
has been filed and an inves-
tigation is pending.

WHAT: Jerry Blackstone
will conduct the premiere
performance of "Cruci-
fixus," winner of the 2011
Brehm Prize in Choral Com-
position, and other pieces.
WHO: School of Music,
Theatre & Dance
WHEN: Tonight at 8 p.m.
WHERE: Walgreen Drama
Center Stamps Auditorium
Medical school
ethics chat
WHAT: Andrew Barnosky,
chair of the Adult Ethics
Committee for the Univer-
sity of Michigan Hospitals
and Health Centers, will
explain how to answer eth-
ics questions during medi-
cal school interviews.
WHO: The Career Center
WHEN: Today at 3:30 p.m.
WHERE: Student Activities
Building

WHAT: "I Do Who Can't,"
a documentary about gay
marriage issues, will be
shown in honor of National
Coming Out Day, followed
by a discussion. Free pizza
will be served.
WHO: The Spectrum
Center
WHEN: Today at 5 p.m.
WHERE: Ross
School of Business
CORRECTIONS
. An article in yes-
terday's edition of the
Daily ('NYT top editor
to delivergrad. speech')
misidentified Rick Berke's
title. He is the assis-
tant managing editor.
" Please report any
error in the Daily to
corrections@michi-
gandaily.com.

A quadriplegic man has
successfully controlled
a robotic arm using his
mind, the Pittsburgh Post-
Gazette reported. Scientists
at the University of Pitts-
burgh have developed a
robotic prosthesis that can
read brain signals.
Lead singer Zach Con-
don and his baby-faced
crew are touring beh-
ing The Rip Tide. The soulful,
timeless and brassy sound of
Beirut can be heard tonight
at Royal Oak Theatre.
>> FOR MORE, SEE ARTS, PAGE 7
3The soft drink company
Dr Pepper launched an
advertisement cam-
paign for a new diet drink
with the slogan "It's not for
women," the Associated
Press reported. The new
drink, Dr Pepper Ten, has 10
calories and grey packaging.

EDITORIAL STAFF
Nick Spar Managing Editor nickspar@michigandaily.com
Nicole Aber ManagingNewsEditor aber@michigandaily.com
SENIOR NEWS EDITORS: Bethany Biron, Dylan Cinti, Caitlin Huston, Joseph Lichterman,
Brienne Prusak
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITORS: Haley Glatthorn, Claire Goscicki, Suzanne Jacobs, Sabira
Kahn, Michele Narov, Paige Pearcy, Adam Rubenfire, Kaitlin Williams
Michelle Dewitt and opinioneditors@michigandaily.com
Emily Orley Editorial PagetEditors
SENIOR EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS: Aida Ali, Ashley Griesshammer, Andrew Weiner
ASSISTANT EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS: Harsha Nahata, Timothy Rabb
StephenJ. Nesbitt and sportseditors@michigandaily.com
Tim Rohan Managing Sports Editors
SENIOR SPORTS EDITORS: Ben Estes, Michael Forek, Zach Helfand, Luke Pasch, Zak
Pyzi, K evi n RafRtery i ek,5~~abiinn'au,,05,
ASIS ANTSPRS EDITORS: Everett Cook, Neal Rothschild, Matt Rudnitsky, Matt
Slovin, Liz Vukelich, Daniel Wasserman
SharnnJacabs Managing Aetstditon jaobs@michigandailyecom
SENO ARTSEDITORS LeahBurgn viPandeyJennaier dy, g
ASSISTANT ARTS EDITORS: Jacob Axelrad, Cassie Balfour, Joe Cadagin, Emma Gase,
Proma Khosia, David Tao
Marissa McClain and photo@michigandaily.com
Jed Moch Managing Photo Editors
ASSISTANT PHOTOEDITORS: Erin Kirkland, Terra Molengraff, AnnaSchulte
ZachBergson and design@michigandaily.com
Helen Lieblich MaagingDesigotditors
SNIORODSIGNEIO : A innaLein-iinskHiLi
ASSISTANT DESIGN EDITORS: Kristi Begonja, Corinn Lewis
Carolyn Klarecki Magazine Editor klarecki@michigandaily.com
DEPUTYMAGAZINE EDITORS:Stephen Ostrowski, Devon Thorsby, Elyana Twiggs
Josh Healy copy chief copydesk@michigandaily.com
SENIOR COPYEDITORS: Christine Chun, Hannah Poindexter
Sarah Squire Webevelopment Manager squire@michigandaily.com
Imran Sayed Public Editor publiceditor@michigandaily.com
BUSINESS STAFF
Julianna Crim Associate Business Manager
Rachel Greinetz Sales Manager
Alexis Newton Production Manager
Meghan Rooney Layout Manager
tonnor Byrd FinancesManager
QUy Vo Circulation Manager
The Michigan Daily ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and
winter terms by students at the University of Michigan. One copy is available free of charge
toalreaders.Additionacopiesmaybepickedupat theDaily'sofficefors$2.subscriptionsfor
fal term, starting in September.viaU.S.mail are $110. Winter term (anuary throughtApril)is
s$1s yearlong (september through Aprilis$95.Usniversity affiliates are subject to aredced
subscripioiraten-camussuscipiinsiforaliterm . asipionsmsthepepid.
ThesMihiganDaiis a mebeofThe ssoiate Pess and Thessoiatd CollgiatePes.

4

I

0

Suspected Taliban fighters
tortured in Afghan prisons

United Nations both international and Afghan

reports beatings,
electric shocks in
detention centers
KABUL, Afghanistan (AP)
- Beatings, electric shocks and
other forms of torture were
administered to suspected Tali-
ban fighters in some Afghan-run
detention centers, the U.N. said
yesterday, even as the U.S. and
others have spent billions of dol-
lars training the police and secu-
rity services.
The abuse was not the result
of Afghan government policy, but
of individual actions that were
mostly ignored by the security
services, according to the 74-page
U.N. report.
Although Afghan security offi-
cials have long been suspected
of torturing detainees to elicit
information and confessions, the
report for the first time confirms
the practice and outlines much of
the abuse.
It found that detainees in 47
facilities in 24 provinces run by
the Afghan National Police and
the Directorate of Security suf-
fered interrogation techniques
that constituted torture under

law.
The NATO-led international
military coalition announced
last month that it had stopped
transferring detainees to 16 of
the facilities. NATO was taking
action to help fix the problem
before resumingthe transfers,the
report said.
International organizations
and governments have spent
years trying to bring good gover-
nance and rule of law to Afghani-
stan, a goal that has taken added
significance following a decision
to hand over security responsi-
bilities to the Afghan government
by the end of 2014 - when all for-
eign combat troops are to leave
the country.
According to the U.N. report,
the torture allegations could
under U.S. law endanger Ameri-
can funding to some of security
services. The U.S. provides the
overwhelming majority of the
cash currently flowing into train-
ing and mentoring programs.
It said the torture allegations
"could also trigger application" of
a 1997 law that bars the U.S. gov-
ernment from providing funding,
weapons or training to any unit of
the security forces of a country if
the U.S. secretary of state deter-
mines there is credible evidence

that it "has committed gross
human rights violations."
The law would not be applied,
however, if the U.S. determined
that action was being taken to
solve the problem.
One such step, it said, would
include bringing tojustice "those
officials responsible for torture
and ill-treatment"
The U.N. said Afghan secu-
rity ministries cooperated with
the investigation and have taken
measures to stop the abuse after
being shown the report. They
have opened investigations, reas-
signed personnel and have indi-
cated that those responsible will
be suspended from their positions
and in serious cases, prosecuted.
Drafted by the U.N.'s Afghan
mission, known as UNAMA, the
report was based on interviews
with 379 detainees from October
2010 to August 2011.
Most of the detainees were
"suspected of being Taliban fight-
ers, suicide attack facilitators,
producers of improvised explo-
sive devices, and others implicat-
ed in crimes associated with the
armed conflict in Afghanistan."
Torture methods included sus-
pending people by their wrists,
beating the soles of the feet, elec-
tric shocks, twisting detainees'
genitals and removing toe nails.

I

W W r ] /I.f f~
KHALIL HAMRA/AP
An Egyptian relative ofaone of the Copts who were killed during clashes with the Egyptian army late Sunday, mourns over
his coffin outside the morgue of the Copts hospital in Cairo, Egypt, yesterday.
Egyptians in Michigfan
mourn death of protest ers

U OFG HOUSING FAIR
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13TH
1 PM -4PM
AT THE "U" - RIGHT ON CAMPUS!
STOP BY AND MEET LOCAL AREA
APARTMENT AND RENTAL HOUSING PROVIDERS ON
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13TH INSIDE THE UNION.
COME AND FIND YOUR PERFECT HOUSING
OPTIONS FOR THE 2012-2013 SCHOOL YEAR!

Egyptian
Americans honor
slain Coptic
Christians
DETROIT (AP) - Egyptian
Christians living in the U.S. said
yesterday that they are horri-
fied by violence that has erupted
against Copts back home, includ-
ing a deadly assault on those try-
ing to stage a peaceful protest in
Cairo in response to an attack on
a church.
Coptic Christians in Michigan
and California were among those
heeding the call of their spiritual
leader, Pope Shenouda III, to
participate in a three-day period
of mourning starting today for
the victims of the worst sectar-
ian violence in Egypt since the
uprising that ousted President
Hosni Mubarak in February. The
death toll yesterday after a night
of rioting rose to 26, and most
were Copts.
"We're not looking for any
revenge; we're looking for peace
in Cairo and Egypt and every-

where in the world," said the Rev.
Maximus Habib of St. Mark Cop-
tic Orthodox Church and the St.
Mary & St. Philopater Church in
the Detroit suburb of Troy. Com-
bined, the congregations serve
about 600 families.
Habib said a close friend of his
brother was among the dead.
Despite his pleas for peace,
anger was evident among mem-
bers of the U.S. expatriate com-
munity of Copts, who number
about 300,000. The largest con-
centrations include communi-
ties in New York and northern
New Jersey, Boston, Los Angeles,
Chicago, Detroit, Houston and
Cleveland.
The clashes Sunday night
raged over a large section of
downtown Cairo and drew in
Christians, Muslims and secu-
rity forces. They began when
about 1,000 Christian protesters
tried to stage a peaceful sit-in
outside the state television build-
ing along the Nile in downtown
Cairo. The protesters said they
were attacked by "thugs" with
sticks and the violence then spi-
raled out of control after a speed-
ing military vehicle jumped up

onto a sidewalk and rammed into
some of the Christians.
Christians, who make up
about 10 percent of Egypt's 85
million people, blame the ruling
military council that took power
after the uprising for being too
lenient on those behind a spate
of anti-Christian attacks since
Mubarak's ouster.
Saad Michael Saad, an electri-
cal engineer who lives in Palos
Verdes, Calif., arrived in the U.S.
in 1977 and still has family in
Alexandria and Cairo. Saad, 66,
has written hundreds of articles
about contemporary Coptic his-
tory.
He said his relatives are terri-
fied by the violence against the
Coptic Christians.
"The thugs stop people on
bridges and bottlenecks and they
ask the person, 'Are you Chris-
tian?' If they are Christian, they
smash his windshield and injure
him," Saad said. "Even when
they stay home, my relatives are
saying there are mobs running
around the streets and invading
homes, occupying empty apart-
ments. There is no law in the
land."

SPNnSARnen RY

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