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September 29, 2011 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 2011-09-29

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4

8A - Thursday, September 29, 2011

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

8A - Thursday September 29 2011 The MicIgnDiy-mcgaalco

The new Kirkland & Ellis Caf, located in the Law School's Hutchins Hall, opened earlier this month.

APPS
From Page 1A
the user's location using GPS and
can emit a high-pitched alarm to
deter anyone who appears to be a
threat.
University alum Marsha New-
man, president of AMP, LLC - the
company that operates OnCall
Defender - said the app also has
a stealth mode, which can be used
in situations when speaking might
be dangerous.Throughthestealth
mode, the app sends information
to OnCall Defender's monitor-
ing station at the touch of a but-
ton. OnCall Defender's licensed
monitoring station then contacts
authorities and passes on the
user's information.
"A lot of times in an emergen-
cy situation you're not in a posi-
tion to say, 'I feel uncomfortable
with this guy,"' Newman said.
"It has particular relevance on
campus because you can do the
stealth mode, you don't have to
get parents involved, (and) you
don't have to get anyone else
involved."
In light of the recent assaults
in Ann Arbor and attempted
robberies on campus, Marsha'
and her husband Fred Newman,
also a University alum and CEO
of AMP, LLC, said they hope
students with iPhones will use
the mobile app. Marsha said
she believes OnCall Defender is
faster and more efficient than
callingt911 and, like a home alarm

system, the monitoring station
immediately knows who's call-
ing.
"The main goal is for people
to protect themselves - to have
a monitored emergency security
system," Marsha said.
Diane Brown, spokeswoman
for the University's Department
of Public Safety, said though she
is unfamiliar with the mobile
app, she believes calling 911is the
"most effective way to get help."
Brown suggested that stu-
dents use the Blue Light Emer-
gency Phone System on campus
or text DPS in situations when
speaking aloud is difficult.
The OnCall Defender mobile
app is free to download, but
iPhone users pay a subscrip-
tion fee of $6.99 per month for a
year-long subscription or $11.99
for month-to-month service. A
similar mobile app, MyForce,
is compatible with the iPhone,
BlackBerry and Android. While
it costs the same for amooth-long
subscription, it is more expensive
than OnCall Defender for a year-
long subscription at $119.
Similar to OnCall Defender,
the MyForce program has cus-
tomers register personal infor-
mation and upload a picture of
themselves. MyForce also uses a
GPS tracking system that helps
local police departments find the
reportee when the distress signal
is sent.
The main difference between
the two apps is that MyForce also
records the incident once the dis-

tress signal is sent. According to
the MyForce website, the com-
pany aims to serve as an alterna-
tive to blue light phones and to
provide users with an additional
emergency and safety resource.
"Wherever students are on
campus when they send their
alert from their smartphone, you
get an instant alert notification
in an emergency, alleviating the
student's need to find a blue-light
phone," the MyForce website
states.
According to the MyForce
Facebook page, the company
has a current three-month free
promotion because September is
National Campus Safety Aware-
ness Month.
LSA junior Kelly Lenkevich
said she is unfamiliar with the
mobile apps and doesn't feel the
need to pay for the services.
"I don't feel threatened enough
for it to be a worthwhile invest-
ment," Lenkevich said.
However, Lenkevich added
that this kind of mobile app might
be a good resource in an emer-
gency.
"If you're in a situation, you
can't always take the time to call
911," she said.
Similarly, LSA junior DeJone
Miles said she is not interested
in paying for a safety mobile app
service, though she supports
their purpose to increase stu-
dent safety. She said if a similar
and free smartphone application
were available, she would con-
sider using it.

CAFE
From Page 1A
priced," Pizana said. "We hope to
gain thetrust of the students, that
they can come here and not feel
that we're taking more money out
of their pockets than whatthey're
already putting into the school."
Pizana added that the Kirkland
& Ellis Caf6 uses local ingredients
- including produce from East-
ern Market in Detroit - and sells
homemade goods.
"We have a bakery out of
Detroit that we use that brings
in fresh muffins and donuts and
(other products)," Pizana said.
"We also provide our own fresh
baked goods: scones, cookies, rice
krispie treats, brownies - that
sort of thing we all take care of in
house here."
The cafe also imports Star-
bucks coffee. But Pizana said
the caf6 offers the full Starbucks
menu at a slightly cheaper price
than the franchise's stores.
"We'd done our research, and
Starbucks was what we felt was
wanted by the people that both go
to school here and study and then
also the people around town,"
Pizana said.
The opening of the Kirkland &
Ellis Cafe was on Sept.-7 around
the same time as the closing of
the Law Library's snack bar, a
small cafe previously located on
the library's lower level. Though

Pizana recognizes that the snack
bar was a popular choice for
many students, he said he hopes
the new cafe can fill the snack
bar's void.
"We've been well accepted due
to the change with the snack bar
downstairs," Pizana said. "A few
people had mixed feelings about
it, but now that we've been up
and running and we've strived
for customer service and gained
those customers on a one-on-one
level ... I think we've kind of won
them over with our caf6 and the
products that we serve."
Business at the cafe has been
going well during its first three
weeks, Pizana said. He added that
the Sept. 7 grand opening ceremo-
ny of the Robert B. Aikens Com-
mons increased the number of
students and staff visitingthe cafe.
The business is also in the
process of setting up a system
to accept Blue Bucks, but Pizana
said he hopes the caf6's cus-
tomer demographic will expand
beyond Law School students and
staff.
"We are really hoping that the
public finds out about us - people
passing through from classes,
people passing through to work,"
Pizana said.
Pizana said he believes the
personal'nature of the caf6, along
with the quality of food it serves,
will draw customers.
"You can go into any caf6 and
get a sandwich, but the experi-

ence, I think, is what brings peo-
ple back," Pizana said. "We are
very personable here. We make
it an effort for everyone, not just
our cooks but our cashiers, to
know our customers on a person-
al basis."
First year Law School student
Elisabeth Madden said she has
been to the cafe everyday since
it opened and finds the location a
convenient stop between classes.
"We have a lot of one-hour
breaks in our classes, so it's not
really enough time to go home,"
Madden said. "So it's'nice to have
a place to be able to sit down and
have a snack or coffee."
First year Law School student
Laura Jacobson said she also fre-
quents .the new cafe and enjoys
the salads, sandwiches and muf-
fins. She added that the snack bar
was "awful," and she doesn't miss
it, even if products at the new cafe
are slightly more expensive.
"I know everything at the
snack bar was like a dollar or two,
but it's really not that expensive
(at the Kirkland & Ellis Cafe),"
Jacobson said.
Madden also said the new cafe
is an improvement over the snack
bar and offers a better space for
students.
"It's a nice place to kick back
after class and relax and see
friends, but it's also quiet enough
that it's a good place to study and
get ready for the class you have
the next day," Madden said.

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