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2 - Tuesday, September 20, 2011

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

2 - Tuesday, September 20, 2011 The Michigan Daily - michigandailycom

MONDAY:
In Other Ivory Tower!

WEDNESDAY:
Professor Profiles

THURSDAY: FRIDAY:
Campus Clubs Photos of the Week

C ie Michigan 1aI(
420 Maynard St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1327
www.michigandaily.com
STEPHANIE STEINBERG ZACH YANCER
Editor in Chief Business Manager
734-418-4115 ext. 1251 734-418-4115 ext. 1241
steinberg@michigandailycom zyancer@michigandaity.com

'U' launches male calendar

30 years ago this week: (Sept. 24,
1981) - After a Michigan State Uni-
versity calendar featuring scantily
clad male students sold more than 700
copies over three days in EastLansing,
students at the University of Michigan
tried to replicate the success of their
in-state rivals.
Wearing gym shorts and strategi-
cally placed towels, men from frater-
nities and varsity sports teams at the
University posed for the calendar free
of charge in hopes of upstaging the
Spartans.
Nancy Anderson, the calendar's
creator, told The Michigan Daily at
the time that the product was "clas-
sically suggestive" and that she found
all the models through recommenda-
tions from sororities and bar manag-
ers.

"When girls told me about some
really sharp guys, I trusted all those
votes of confidence," Anderson said
at the time, hinting that the models
were "really good-looking with good
bodies."
50 years ago this week: (Sept. 21,
1961) - Zeta Beta Tau became the first
fraternity to move its house to North
Campus.
Fifty-one men moved into the
house on the corner of Broadway and
Hubbard streets. ZBT made special
transportation arrangements to pick
up potential new members and drive
them from Central Campus as they
began the rush process.
"The new house is really not much
further away than our old one," ZBT
President Art Rosenbaum told the
Daily at the time. "It's just a bit more

secluded."
80 years ago this week: (Sept. 22,
1931) - New rules governing the
fraternity rush process, conceived by
the Interfraternity Council and Dean
of Students Joseph A. Bursley, went
into effect at the beginning of the new
academic year.
Several new restrictions were put
in place limiting the amount of inter-
action fraternity members could have
with the potential recruits.
For example, unless employed by a
fraternity, freshmen couldn't visit any
of the houses during the fall semester.
If a fraternity was holding an open
house, potential recruits and estab-
lished fraternity members were only
permitted to speak outside the event if
they were actually familial brothers.
- JOSEPH LICHTERMAN

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TERA MOLNGRAF/Dail
A student walks through the Law Quad
rangle in the rain yesterday.

CRIME NOTES

Pocket fumble
WHERE: Michigan
Stadium
WHEN: Sunday at about
3 p.m.
WHAT: A man said he
was pick-pocketed at about
noon during the Michigan
football game on Saturday,
University Police reported.
Unauthorized charges
were made to his credit
card.
Bike rides away
WHERE: 2300 block Stone
Road
WHEN: Sunday at about
5 p.m.
WHAT: A bicycle was
taken from a residence
between 6 p.m. on Saturday
and 4:30 p.m. on Sunday,
University Police reported.
There are no suspects.

Dog bites man
WHERE: The Diag
WHEN: Sunday at about
5:40 p.m.
WHAT: A man was bitten
by a dog, University Police
reported. He was treated in
the emergency room at the
University Hospital. Reper-
cussions for the dog and its
owner are currently under
investigation.
Sketchy sketch
WHERE: Hatcher Gradu-
ite Library
WHEN: Sunday at about
11 p.m.
WHAT: A pencil drawing
of swastikas was found on
a basement wall, Univer-
sity Police reported. The
reportee said this was the
second time in two weeks a
similar drawing was found
on the wall.

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES
DADT repeal
celebration

WHAT: Several campus
groups will celebrate the
official end of the military's
"don't ask don't, tell policy"
by handing out free goodies
on the Diag.
WHO: The Spectrum
Center, Michigan Student
Assembly and Stonewall
Democrats. .
WHEN: Today from 11 a.m.
until 2 p.m.
WHERE: The Diag
President's
Open House
WHAT: University Presi-
dent Mary Sue Coleman will
hold her annual open house.
WHO: Office of the Presi-
dent
WHEN: Today from 4 p.m.
to 5 p.m.
WHERE: 815 South Univer-
sity Ave.

CORRECTIONS
. A Sept.15 article in
the Daily ('LibertySt.
Borders space could be
split into three areas')
incorrectly stated
the status and future
use of the Borders
space. The space may
have been bought and
could potentially be
subdivided into three
different build-outs. The
story also incorrectly
misquoted Rachel Pastiva
and misidentified her.
Pastiva is the manager
of Crazy Wisdom
Bookstore & Tea Room.
. Please report any
error in the Daily to
corrections@michi-
gandailycom.

A Florida funeral home
now offers its customers
an alternative to burial or
cremation - body liquifica-
tion, the Daily Mail reported.
The corpses are dissolved
in under three hours and
remaining bones can be
returned to the survivors.
Junior running back
Vincent Smith will
start Saturday's game
against San Diego State.
Smith rushed for 118 yards
on nine carries last weekend
against Eastern Michigan.
D FOR MORE, SEE SPORTS, PAGE 7
An 81-year-old Flor-
ida woman who per-
forms as a volunteer
clown shares her stage name
with one of pop music's big-
gest sensations, WTSP.com
reported. The woman, who
goes by Gaga, says she has no
plans to sue the more famous
Lady Gaga over the name.

EDITORIAL STAFF
Nick Spar ManagingEditor nickspar@michigandaily.com
NicoleAber Managing NewsEditor aber@michigandaily.com
SENIR NEWSEDITORS: Bethany Biron, Dylan Cinti, Caitlin Huston, Joseph Lichterman,
ASSISTANTNEWSEDITORS:HaleyGlatthorn,ClaireGoscicki,SuzanneJacobs,Sabira
Kahn, Michele Narov, Paige Pearcy, Adam Rubenfire, Kaitlin Williams
MichelleDewitt and opinioneditors@michigandaily.com
Emily Orley Editorial PagetEditors
SENIOR EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS: Aida Ali,Ashley Griesshammer, Andrew Weiner
ASSISTANTEDITOIALPAGE EDITORS:Harsha NahataTimothyRabb
Stephen J. Nesbitt and sportseditor-swmichigandaityxcom
Tim Rohan Managing Sports Editors
SENIOR SPORTS EDITORS: Ben Estes, Michael Florek, Zach Helfand, Luke Pasch, Zak
Pyzik, Kevin aftery
ASSAnS S EDITORS: Everett Cook, Neal Rothschild, Matt Rudnitsky, Matt
Slovin, Liz Vukelich, Daniel Wasserman
SharonJacobs ManagingArts Editor jacobs@michigandaily.com
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BUSINESSSTAFF
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FELLOWSHIP
From Page 1
the recipients quarterly over five
years. Miles said she plans to split
her grant among several projects,
including research about the his-
tory of slavery in Detroit and
throughout the state of Michigan.
"It's a really fascinating story
that I look forward to having time
to delve into," she said. "And, of
course, having fellowship funds
helps to create time."
Miles also said she will devote
some fundstoenhance ECOGirls, a
program she developed to enhance

environmental awareness and
cultural diversity among elemen-
tary and middle school age girls in
Michigan's urban communities.
Yamashita wrote that she
will continue to study the biol-
ogy of stem cells, focusing on the
asymmetric division of the cells.
She said asymmetric division is
believed to generate tissue homeo-
stasis - or a stable condition -
and when it malfunctions, it can
become a causing factor of cancer
or tissue degeneration.
Sanford, who researches
organic and inorganic chemistry,
will work on the development of
metal catalysts to cause a reac-

tion in carbon-hydrogen bonds.
Though the bonds are found in
many chemicals ranging from
DNA to shampoo, Sanford wrote
that the bonds are typically unre-
active. If the metal catalysts can
be used to cause a reaction, San-
ford wrote, the bond could be
made into new atom groups used
to make pharmaceuticals greener
and could also become possible
natural gas convertors.
The MacArthur Fellowship has
no application process. Recipients
are nominated anonymously by a
group of people who, also anony-
mously, submit recommendations
to a selection committee of about

a dozen leaders in fields ranging ative efforts and promise of each
from the sciences to the arts. Fellow," Daniel J. Socolow, director
The committee reviews each of the MacArthurFellowsProgram
nominee and then makes recom- wrote in a MacArthur Foundation
mendations to the MacArthur press release sent today. "It comes
Foundation's president and board out of the blue and offers the new
of directors who make the final Fellows the gift of time and the
decision. The foundation typically unfettered opportunity to explore,
awards between 20 and 30 fellow- create and contribute."
ships each year. Miles said she received the call
Fellows, including those at the about 10 days ago and, like the
University, don't know they are other fellows, said it came out of
nominated until they receive a "the clear blue sky."
phone call congratulating them "It was a complete and total
for receiving the grant. shock to get this news," she said.
"The call from the Foundation Sanford wrote in an e-mail
is the culmination of an intensive interview that she was boarding
year or longer review of the cre- a plane to Scotland as she got the
RESEARCH
From Page 1
selves to pilot our way through
turbulent times," he said. "Pro-
fessors who are working in an
area thatrequires alot of external
funding need to think about how
to manage through these times,
which are going to be extended."
In comparison to other
research institutions, however,
Forrest said the University is in a
better position than most.
MACART HUR FOUND2ATION; SCOTT sontERBRa W'rtcuno ut lcy"
rd, Siya Miles, Department of "We're actually quite lucky,"
and Yukiko Yamashita, assistant Forrest said. "We're sitting at the
d assistant professor of cell and devel- top of the pile in'terms of research
ru "ig:

l
l

call from the foundation. Initially,
she thought it was a practical joke.
"As you can imagine, I did not
sleep much on the flight," Sanford
wrote.
According to Yamashita, the
MaCarthur Foundation told the
recipients that until today, they
could only tell their spouses about
the award. When she first told her
husband, he thought it was a hoax.
Yamashita wrote: "He seri-
ously warned me, 'Okay, if you
get a second phone call asking
(for) your bank account and the
PIN number, saying they need it
for award money transfer, don't
give them away."'
STUDENTS RECEIVE
FACULTY-FUNDED
SCHOLARSHIP
Earlier in the meeting, Semyon
Meerkov, a professor of electri-
cal engineering and computer
science, gave an update on the
first two student recipients of a
faculty-supported, need-based
fellowship called University Fac-
ulty Undergraduate Scholarship
Foundation, which he proposed
to SACUA in May 2007.
Meerkov said that 102 faculty
members donated money and
raised $66,760 for the students.
That amount was then matched
by the Office of the President and
the scholarship fund reached a
total of $121,514.
Because $6,000 is needed each
year to maintain the program,
Meerkov said additional funds
will be needed. To provide the
funding, Meerkov said the foun-
dation will have a campaign to
raise more money, and he urged
assembly members to make a
donation of $10 each month.
- The two recipients of the
scholarship, LSA senior Lama
Bandar and Engineering fresh-
man David Thompson, who each
receive $3,000 per year they're
in school, gave a brief speech to
the assembly about what theyS
have done or plan to do as under-
graduates.
Barald said she hopes more fac-
ulty members will donate to the
faculty Undergraduate Scholar-
ship Foundation.
"The faculty are only as good
as the students and vice versa,"
Barald said. "It's a real symbiotic
relationship."

CoURTESY OF THE JOHN D. AND CATHERINET. N
From left: Chemistry Prof. Melanie Sanfo
Afroamerican & African Studies director,
professor in the Life Science Institute an

CONSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENTS,
2010-11:
THE DEFENSE OF MARRIAGE ACT
POPULATION LIMIT ON CALIFORNIA'S PRISONS
AMERICAN MILITARY ACTION IN LIBYA
BIG BROTHER AND THE FOURTH AMENDMENT
University of Michigan Law School
Hutchins Hall, Room 250
Tuesday, September 20
4:10-5:40 i'M.
Refreshments Immediately Following
SPONSORED BY U-M OFFICE OF THE PROVOST

opmental biology.
poetry series presents
An Evening with Pulitzer Prize-winning Pet
Franz Wright
September 23,2011, 7pm
Reading from his newest work
Reception and book-signing
to follow.
COMPACT: Sarah lMessee LOCATION: 7101 W. y Li Rd. Ann Arbor
CopperColored Mountain arts A Readings and Conversations are FREE
twail-saraa cmars org anod PensOtre pablic,
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funding."
In an interview after the meet-
ing, Kate Barald, chair of the
Senate Advisory Committee on
University Affairs and aprofessor
of cell and developmental biology
and biomedical engineering, said
she's worried about the future of
research with the possible fund-
ing cuts.
"Universities like Michigan
have a very large contingent of
people who are dependent on out-
side funding, and that means that
fewer people could be supported
if that funding stream dries up,"
Barald said. "Unless we can gar-
ner more philanthropy, we're in
trouble because the federal rev-
enue stream is drying up."
In addition, Barald said that
without grants, principal inves-
tigators wouldn't be able to sup-
port workers in their laboratories,
which means research techni-
cians and graduatestudents could
losetheir jobs. She addedthatthis
is the worst climate for federal
funding she's seen in 30 years.

ft

--_.

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