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January 18, 2011 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2011-01-18

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2A - Tuesday, January 18, 2011

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.cam

2A - Tuesday, January18, 2011 The Michigan Daily - michigandailycom

THURSDAY: FRIDAY:
Campus Clubs Photos of the Week

Blame detours for bus delays

Q: What causes delays in the Uni-,
versity bus system?
It's not an unfamiliar scene to
see a couple dozen students stand-
ing outside at abus stop in all sorts
of weather. And though University
Parking and Transportation Services
promises that buses run about every
10 minutes, many students who regu-
larly travel viaUniversity buses would
beg to differ.
According to the PTS website, the
University operates a total of 60 buses,
moving between North, Central
and South Campuses as well as the
Medical Campus and East Ann Arbor
Health Center.
Because of the abundance of con-
struction taking place in Ann Arbor
and on campus, buses are often faced
with the obstacle of creating new
routes to best accommodate students
and community members while
avoiding roadblocks.
Construction atthe C.C. Little bus

stop last summer caused a complete
shutdown of the central area for bus
pick-up and drop-off on Central Cam-
pus. As a result, temporary bus stops
were set up along South University
Avenue and other roads on campus.
And a water main break on North
Campus in January 2009 forced the
Bursley-Baits buses to take a detour
on Plymouth Road, and temporarily
shut daiwn the Northwood Express
route, according to a Jan.'15, 2009
Michigan Daily article.
The temporary detour led to
further delays from increased time
driving during rush hour driving and
longer routes, making many students
using the buses late for classes.
While road construction and
obstruction can cause traffic delays,
at times, the buses themselves create
the delay. Though the buses are oper-
ated by specially licensed individuals,
accidents do happen. It's not unheard
of for a University bus to get into a

minor accident with other another
vehicle.
In April 2010, a University bus rear-
ended a University Police patrol car
while it was parked near the Veterans
Administration Hospital, according to
an April 16, 2010 article in the Daily.
The police officer received non-life
threatening injuries, according to the
article.
In an attempt to reduce the number
of students waitingat the bus stop for
extended periods of time, the Magic
Bus feature on the PTS website shows
waiting times for each bus stop and
where buses are on their given routes.
There are also electronic displays at
the Michigan Union, the Michigan
League and Pierpont Commons that
show bus wait times, and touch-
screen displays in South Quadrangle
Residence Hall, Bursley Residence
Hall and the Shapiro Undergraduate
Library detail bus routes.
- DEVON THORSBY

Students wait for the bus at the C.C. Little stop - a
daily ritual for students who commute between North
and Central Campus.

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The Michigan Daily(ISSN 074-%7)is published Monday through Friday dringthefall and winter
terms by students at the University of Michigan.One copy is availablefree of charge toallreaders.
AdditionacopiesmaybepickedupattheDaily'sofficefor$2.subscriptionsforfallterm,startingin
September,viaU.S.mailare$110.Winter term(Januarythrough April)is$15,yearlong(September
loughsApiis$195Uniesity afiliatesaesubjecttoareducedsubscription rate. On-campus
subscriptionshfortalltermare$3.Subscriptionsmust be prepaid.TheichiganDaiyis amember
of The Associated Press and The AssociatedCollegiatePress.

0
0

o0

CRIME NOTES
Plate plundered Two busted for

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES

WHERE: Lot NC-331400
Hubbard
WHEN: Sunday at about 7:15
p.m.
WHAT: A license plate was
stolen from aparked car
between Saturday evening and
10 a.m. Sunday morning, Uni-
versity Police reported. There
are no suspects.
PD0-d t , koss.

boozing too hard
WHERE: Bursley Hall
WHEN: Saturday at about
11:15 p.m.
WHAT: Two students were
issued MIPs afterthey were
found intoxicated outside
the residence hall, University
Police reported. One student
was taken to the University
Hospital for treatment.

evade police Clothes nabbed

Common
Concerns
meeting
WHAT: A series aimed
to help students enhance
academic achievement
outside the classroom.
WHO: Counseling and
Psychological Services
WHEN: Todayat 4:15p.m.
WHERE: Michigan
Union, room 3100
MLK Day
round table
WHAT: A discussion
between Taubman College
and University of Michigan
Detroit Center regarding
Dr. King's legacy in the
context of urban planning.
WHO: College of Architec-
ture and Urban Planning
WHEN: Today at 6:30 p.m.
WHERE: Art and Architec-
ture Buildingroom 2104

Genocide
testimonies
WHAT: A lecture that
discusses stories of
Holocaust survivors
and other genocides.
WHO: Judaic Studies
WHEN: Todayat 4 p.m,
WHERE: 220 S.
Thayer, room 2022
Glory Phi God
student meeting
WHAT: Participants will
discuss the mission of the
organization. Music and
free food will be offered.
WHO: Glorify God
Campus Ministry
WHEN: Tonight at 7 p.m.
WHERE: Michigan
League, 3rd Room B
CORRECTIONS
. Please report any
error in the Daily to
corrections@michi-
gandaily.com.

Starbucks is introducing
a new drink size for iced
drinks called trenta, The
Huffington Post reported. The
new size is 916 mL. The current
largest size, or the venti, is 591
mL.
Michigan sophomore
defenseman Lee Moffie
scored two goals in last
weekends home-and-home ice
hockey series against Ferris
State en route to CCHA Defen-
seman of the Week honors.
FOR MORE,SEE SPORTSTUESDAY
A branch of the United
Commerical (UCO) Bank
was opened without locks
in Maharashtra, India, The
Times of India reported. Bank
employees claim that God
guards the bank located in a
village that experiences little
theft or robbery.

WHERE: West Quad
WHEN: Saturday at about 3
a.m.
WHAT: Four people were
observed smoking marijuana
in the West Quad courtyard,
University Police reported.
When approached, three of
the suspects ran from Housing
Soeuritv

WHERE: C.S. Mott Children's
Hospital
WHEN: Monday at about 5:15
a.m.
WHAT: A patient's relative
reported having clothing sto-
len sometime between Sunday
night and early Monday morn-
ing, University police report-
ed. There are nn susnects.

0i

A rescue worker carries supplies for residents of a neighborhood isolated due to landslides in Nova Friburgo, Brazil. Brazil's
army sent 700 soldiers yesterday to help desperate neighborhoods that have been cut off from food.
Brazil troops build bridges
to reach mudslide victims

Claiminc 665hrlivs

ml
neig
TER
Brazil'
soldier
to des
have bE
or help
mudsli
ple.
Trot
least o
vacatio
cials sa
ways rs
area nc
hit, ha
the he
beginr
eventu
under
The
bridges
meters
suppor
big eqs
and ret
Day:
tons of
rents o
mount

g1111 "e 1 a1VG ly into towns that are weekend get-
udslides cut off aways for the Rio area.
Rescuers had yet to reach
shborhoods from about 20 neighborhoods, though
a break in rains and better visibil-
food, water ity allowed about 12 helicopters to
begin tiking supplies and firefight-
ESOPOLIS, Brazil (AP) - ers in, while shuttling injured sur-
s army yesterday sent 700 vivors out.
s to help throw a lifeline But pilots said flying was still
perate neighborhoods that treacherous in the area full of jag-
een cut off from food, water ged mountain peaks, where there
in recovering bodies since are few safe landing zones and
des killed at least 665 peo- power lines are draped between
peaks through seemingly clear
ops have already set up at space.
ne bridge in the mountain "These are the most challeng-
tn city of Teresopolis, offi- ing conditions I've flown in," said
id, but at least 10 main high- Adalberto Ortale, a helicopter pilot
emain blocked in the rugged for Ibama, the enforcement branch
orth of Rio where the slides of the Environment Ministry. "The
mpering efforts to move in majority of people doing the flying
avy machinery needed to are not from here and you have to
massive clean up efforts and orient yourself on the fly."
ally dig out bodies stuck All levels of government have
tons of mud and debris. come under heavy criticism for not
troops plan to set up mobile alerting people to the dangers -
s that can span 200 feet (60 and of allowing homes to be built in
and are robust enough to high-risk areas. Local mayors have
t the hundreds of pieces of said they did not receive any warn-
uipment needed in clean up iog a storm of that magnitude was
covery efforts. about to hit.
S of heavy rains unleashed Brazil's minister of science and
earth, rock and raging tor- technology, Aloizio Mercadante,
f water down steep, forested said 5 million Brazilians live in
ainsides Wednesday, direct- someo800areas athigh risk for mud-

slides and floods across the nation,
but that it would take at least four
years for a nationwide alert system
to be in place, the Folha de S. Paulo
newspaper reported on its website
yesterday.
Mercadante offered few details
on how such a system would be
built.
After a meeting with President
Dilma Rousseff in Brasilia, Mer-
cadante said Brazil has a relatively
robustsystem of collecting weather
information via satellite and radar,
but that the nation needs more
people to interpret the data and
alert local officials to dangers in a
coordinated manner.
In downtown Teresopolis,
frustration and hopelessness was
building. Hundreds of survivors
remained uncertain of how they
were going to be able to leave
crowded shelters and restart their
lives.
Eunice Peixoto de Souza, 57, said
she was thankful for the shelter
and the hot lunches served at the
Teresopolis gymnasium where
she has been staying for five days
with three of her children and
three grandchildren. But she has
nowhere else to go, and the pros-
pect of spending another week, or
weeks, on thethin foam mattresses
laid on the floor is hard to bear.

4

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