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April 14, 2011 - Image 1

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Ann Arbor, Michigan

Thursday, April 14, 2011

michigandaily.com

FINANCING YOUR EDUCATION
Report: Pell
Grant rates
at 'U' fall in
recent years

'U' argues rates
have increased,
but says it must do
more to improve
By ADAM RUBENFIRE
Daily StaffReporter
Though the University boasts
one of the 50 largest endow-
ments in the country, a recent
report faults the University and
other wealthy schools for failing
to adequately attract and serve
students with financial need in
recent years.
The report, released by The
Chronicle of Higher Education
on March 27, reveals that the Uni-
versity, along with severalotber
colleges and universities across
the country with large endow-
ments, has not increased its Pell
Grant-eligible student popula-
tion since 2004. However, Uni-
versity records show the number
of Pell Grants awarded to Uni-
versity students in recent years
has increased as a percentage
of the student body. Despite the
discrepancy, University officials
say more work must be done to
attract academically qualified

low-income students.
Pell Grants are federal grants
that subsidize college tuition
for students with annual fam-
ily incomes less than $40,000.
Grants are awarded based on a
formula that considers the cost of
attending the institution and the
student's expected financial con-
tribution, enrollment status and
the length of the academic year.
According to The Chronicle's
report, the University awarded
3,416 Pell Grants to students for
the 2008-2009 academic year -
a 0.2-percent decrease from the
number of grants the University
awarded for the 2004-2005 aca-
demic year. During the interim
academic years, the number of
Pell Grants awarded was largely
stagnant.
The report notes that all 50
universities with the highest
endowments - the University's
endowment was $6.6 billion at
the end of the 2010 fiscal year -
have a relatively small student
population of Pell Grant students
compared to many schools with
smaller endowments. It found
that, on average, 15 percent of
undergraduates at the 50 evalu-
ated institutions received Pell
Grants during the 2008-2009
See PELL GRANTS, Page 3A

Lansing Mayor Virg Bernero speaks at a rally outside the Capitol Building in Lansing yesterday. Bernero and others, many of whom were members of unions
across the state, expressed their dismay with Republican Gov. Rick Snyder's budget proposal, including cuts to higher education funding.
Unions gather in. Lansing
to protest Snyder's budget

GEO, others
express dismay
with proposed K-12,
higher ed. cuts
By ANNA ROZENBERG
Daily StaffReporter
LANSING - Thousands of
people representing various
labor unions gathered on the
steps of the Capitol Building

yesterday to voice their con-
cerns about Republican Gov.
Rick Snyder's proposed budget
cuts.
Snyder's proposal calls for a
$213 million reduction in alloca-
tions to higher education fund-
ing statewide, with a 15-percent
cut to higher education for
the state's 15 public universi-
ties, including the University
of Michigan. While protesters
rallied against the higher edu-
cation funding cuts, the State
House Higher Education Appro-

priations Subcommittee, which
has a Republican majority, voted
yesterday approving a simi-
lar higher education funding
reduction of about 15 percent,
with some provisions.
Herbert Sanders, an attorney
for the American Federation
of State, County and Munici-
pal Employees, spoke first at
the rally, urging the event par-
ticipants to be active in voicing
their dissent of Snyder's budget
proposal.
"Let it be known that our

presence here today will not be
limited to stirring words and
unanswered indictment. This
is a call to battle," Sanders said,
receiving enthusiastic chants
from the crowd.
Lincoln Stocks, a history
teacher at East Detroit High
School, said the budget proposal
"will destroy public education
inthe state of Michigan," adding
that the number of students in
his classes has already increased
over the past few years due to
See PROTEST, Page 5A

SUMO-SIZED SAVINGS STU DE NT HOUSING
Saturday night dining to be
Sofferedduring fall semester

RHA passes
resolution, Housing
evaluating budget
By ZACH BERGSON
Daily StaffReporter
After two years of discussions
and student campaigns, dinner
will be back on the menu in Uni-

versity dining halls on Saturday
nights starting in the fall.
With the support of Universi-
ty Housing, the Residence Halls
Association passed a resolution
late last month that would pro-
vide students with the option of
having dinner every night of the
week in campus dining halls.
The decision will revive the Sat-
urday night dining option, which
was cancelled in 2005 because of

low student turnout.
_ RHA President Trevor Grieb
said the association passed a
number of resolutions support-
ing Saturday night dining over
the past two years because there
was strong student support
for the option. However, until
now, University Housing hasn't
approved of the previous resolu-
tions to restore Saturday night
See DINING, Page SA

The co-founders of Sumo Deal, both University students, play chess yesterday in Mason Hall to advertise their new
organization. Sumo Deal is a non-profit organization that works to provide discounts at local businesses.
UNIVERSITY RESEARCH
Study shows gene therapy an effective
treatment of pain in cancer patients

STANDA RDIZED T ESTING
Altered MCAT to test wider variety
of content, more advanced science

A

dditional trials to treat pain associated with
various forms of cancer. But
to be done for University researchers recent-
ly found that gene therapy
new remedy can serve a similar purpose by
relieving cancer symptoms.
ly BRANDON SHAW David Fink, chair of the
Daily StaffReporter Department of Neurology
in the University's Medi-
orphine and other pain cal School, led a team of four
cations that lead to addic- other University researchers
ave been used for decades and three investigators from

Diamyd Medical - a research
firm based in Stockholm - to
conduct a study that tested
the potential implications of
implementing a new treatment
for patients suffering from
immense pain as a result of
various forms of cancer.
The study, which was pub-
lished in the Annals of Neurol-
ogy journal last week, showed
See GENE THERAPY, Page SA

' officials:
Curriculum will
not be alterd by
changes to exam
By JENNIFER LEE
Daily StaffReporter
Future pre-med students
preparing for the Medical Col-
lege Admission Test will have to
study a little extra due to pro-

posed changes to the tesL.
Changes to the MCAT's con-
tent and length will be imple-
mented in 2015, according to the
preliminary recommendations
released by the Association of
American Medical Colleges last
month. Despite the upcoming
variations, University officials
say the alterations won't have a
significant impact on the Uni-
versity's traditional pre-med or
Medical School curriculum.
Jeff Koetje, director of aca-
demics for pre-health programs

for Eaplan Test Prep, said this is
the fifthtimethe MCAT hasbeen
reviewed by an advisory commit-
tee since its inception about 70
years ago.
"This current review of the
MCAT is a very fundamental
review of everything from sci-
ence, to the structure, to the
different sections of the test,"
Koetje said.
The new test will include more
advanced scientific questions
and will evaluate knowledge of
See MCAT, Page 5A

B
Mo
medi
tion h

WEATHER HI: 54
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