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April 08, 2011 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2011-04-08

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Ann Arbor, Michigan

Friday, April 8, 2011

michigandaily.com

HIGHER EDUCATION
Duderstadt
proposes
plan to help
Midwest

JAKE FROMM/Daily
The Michigan hockey team advanced to the NCAA Championship last night after defeating No.1 North Dakota, 2-0. Senior goaltender Shawn Hunwick made
40 saves in a shutout effort. Michigan will play for a national title against Minnesota-Duluth on Saturday.
M hgan hocke s
g about "the team'

Former president
calls for universities
to collaborate for
regional success
By MICHELE NAROV
Daily StaffReporter
While the Midwest was a driv-
ing force in the 20th century
that helped power the rest of the
nation, today it's a vast expanse
of rusting manufacturing indus-
tries and emptied urban centers.
For University President
Emeritus James Duderstadt, the
goal is to put the Midwest back on
the map. To do this, Duderstadt
wrote a recent report outlining
the need for a knowledge-based
economy and calling for colleges
and universities in the region to
help propell the heartland into
the 21st century.
The report, titled "A Master
Plan for Higher Education in
the Midwest: A Roadmap for the
Future of the Nation's Heart-
land," was released on March 31

by the Chicago Council for Glob-
al Affairs and published as one of
the council's Heartland Papers,
which focuses on development in
the Midwest.
Duderstadt, who is also chair
of the Millenium Project - a
research center that studies the
ways technology impacts soci-
ety - explains in the report that
highereducation institutions can
act together to encourage eco-
nomic growth in the Midwest by
applying aspects of the region to
a global mindset, collaborating
instead of competing and having
educators from K-12 to higher
education work together.
Midwestern states should
unite and get out of a state-
focused mindset so the area can
have a greater presence on the
world stage, Duderstadt wrote in
the report.
Collaboration is key to the
region's success, Duderstadt
wrote. If education institu-
tions shared facilities and made
degrees easily transferrable,
universities and colleges could
provide high quality education
See DUDERSTADT, Page 3

ST. PAUL, Minn. -
The battle wounds were
apparent.
Carl Hagelin limped
to the postgame press confer-
ence followingthe Michigan
hockeyteam's 2-0 victory over
North Dakota last night.
And Ben Winnett was a
minute late, as he strolled
in - shirt, tie and a bag of ice
taped on his left forearm - to
take a seat in front of local and

national
reporters.
They
were
signs of
the scars,
bumps
and nicks MARK
they'd sus- BURNS
tain for the
good of the
team.
Let me repeat that for you.

The team.
Tonight, Michigan shocked
the world against the Fighting
Sioux.
Okay, maybe they didn't
really shock the world like the
Fab Five did back in the early
1990s. They weren't that big
of an underdog against the
nation's No. 1 team.
But they did do something
many people within the col-
lege hockey community didn't

think was possible: beat North
Dakota - hands down the best
team coming into the NCAA
Tournament two weeks ago
and the hottest squad in the
country - in what was practi-
cally a road game.
The Wolverines arrived at
the Xcel Energy Center with
their lunch bucket and hard-
hat in tow, willing to go to
work.
See HOCKEY, Page 3

CAMPUS COMMUNITY
0 Students talk diversity
at multicultural event

Panel says 'U'
doesn't do enough
to accommodate
diverse population
By DAVID BUCCILLI
Daily StaffReporter
The issue of diversity within
* the University community took
center stage at a panel discussion

last night.
Organized by the black stu-
dent group Here Earning A Des-
tiny Through Honesty, Eagerness
and Determination of Self, or
H.E.A.D.S., the panel sought to
"break down racial stereotypes
in all communities and to spread
awareness and knowledge about
these communities," LSA senior
James Stinson III, the co-chair
of H.E.A.D.S., said.
The panel, titled "Around the
U: Perspectives of Identities,"

was comprised of eight Univer-
sity students from different eth-
nic, cultural, religious and social
backgrounds who fielded ques-
tions about their cultural expe-
riences. Over the course of the
discussion, the speakers empha-
sized how their backgrounds
have impacted their University
experiences.
Addressing the audience,
panel member and former Michi-
gan Student Assembly President
See DIVERSITY, Page 3

UNIVERSITY RESEARCH
. 'U' researchers link pain from
break-ups to physical response

Members of Michigan's Naval ROTC participate in a series of drills at Nichol's Arboretum yesterday. The drill team
took first place at a competition at the University of Colorado last weekend.
STUDENT PROJECT
New student mentor program aims to
help youth through after-school sports

Study presents new
way of thinking
about recovery
By JENNIFER LEE
Daily StaffReporter
It turns out that the physical
pain of heartache that follows
a break-up isn't a figment of the
imagination.

A recent study led by Universi-
ty professors, published last week
in the Proceedings of the Nation-
al Academy of Sciences, found
that social or romantic rejection
activates the same regions of the
brain that respond to physical
pain in the body.
Ethan Kross, an assistant pro-
fessor of psychology and faculty
associate at the University's Insti-
tute of Social Research, was the
lead author in the study.

"When people think about
intense rejection experiences,
they may well be experiencing
physical pain sensations in their
body," Kross said.
To determine which parts
of the brain are co-activated by
the experiences of rejection and
physical pain, Kross and his col-
leagues conducted a study in
which 40 individuals who had
recently experienced an unde-
See BREAK-UPS, Page 3

i& Mentor for
America to start in
A2 this summer
By SARAH ALSADEN
Daily StaffReporter
This summer, a group of
University students hopes to
make an impact on children's

lives by playing basketball and
football with them.
The student-run program
called i&I Mentor for America
- "i" as a visual representation
of a small child and "I" of a col-
lege student - will offer sports
mentoring to underprivileged
youth involved in community
centers and will train college
students to be coaches and
mentors. The program will

start in Ann Arbor and will
later branch out to other towns
with universities across the
country.
Engineering senior Bo Zhu,
a member of the i&I team,
said the program will feature
a curriculum based on men-
toring and sports and will be
aimed at teaching students life
strategies that will keep them
See MENTOR, Page 3

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