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March 29, 2011 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2011-03-29

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1)E AhIl4an&V~

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tuesday, March 29, 2011

michigandaily.com

THROW YOUR HANDS UP IN THE AIR

UNIVERSITY FACULTY
Credit hr.
regulation
discussed
at SACUA

ALLISON KRUSKE/Daily
Members of the national service fraternity Alpha Phi Omega compete in a cheerleading competition yesterday. The competition was part of Professional Greek
Week and took place during halftime of a powderpuff game, in which various professional fraternities competed against one another.
Sxperts mull trend of mental
health in

Provost seeks
opinions on Dept.
of Education's
proposed changes
By KAITLIN WILLIAMS
Daily StaffReporter
Though each school in the
University requires a specific
number of credit hours before
a student can graduate, there
has been controversy in the past
about what exactly constitutes a
credit hour.
University Provost Philip
Hanlon asked members of the
leading faculty governing body
for informal recommendations
about credit hour requirements
at the Senate Advisory Commit-
tee on University Affairs meeting
in the Fleming Administration
Building yesterday. A move by
the federal government to define
credit hours could affect student
financial aid funding and gradu-
ation requirements, Hanlon told
the faculty members.
The U.S. Department of Edu-
cation proposed defining credit
hours last June. The proposed

regulations would impact Uni-
versity accreditation and access
to student financial aid because
the more credit hours a student
takes, the more funding he or
she can receive in most cases,
accordingto a Council for Higher
Education Accreditation Federal
Update from June 28.
Hanlon said the rules defin-
ing a credit hour were set by
the Department of Education
in October, but the American
Council on Education has asked
the department to reconsider
guidelines. He said he wanted to
bring the issue to the attention of
SACUA members and hear their
opinions onwhere the University
stands.
If the Department of Educa-
tion declines to reconsider, the
guidelines determined in Octo-
ber will take effect on July 1,
according to the timeline estab-
lished in the Federal Update.
The Department of Educa-
tion wants to require two hours
of outside work for every hour of
time spent in a class that is more
than 15 weeks long, Hanlon said.
For research, the requirement
would be two hours of work out-
side of a laboratory.
See SACUA, Page 7

Editor's Note: This is thefirst
of a three-part seriers about
mental health issues on college
campuses.
By SUZANNE JACOBS
Daily StaffReporter
For many students, exam
preparation and writing papers
takes up the majority of week-
ends, and home is just a place to
rest between library visits.
The effects of grueling

schedules on students' mental
health has become increasingly
examined by mental health
professionals. However, while
depression and anxiety may be
a part of students' daily lives,
experts aren't sure if these con-
ditions have resulted in more
mental health issues on col-
lege campuses. Measuring the
trend is difficult, mental health
experts say, due to factors like
the reduction in stigma of psy-
chological health problems.

Other confounding factors -
such as an increase in the num-
ber of students seeking help and
easier access to medications -
can cause growing awareness
of mental health issues to be
mistaken for increased occur-
rence. But many mental health
professionals still believe the
trend exists.
Daniel Eisenberg, an asso-
ciate professor in the Univer-
sity's School of Public Health,
and Justin Hunt, an assistant

PART 1 OF 3: MENTAL
H EALTH ON CAMPUS
professor in the College of
Medicine at the University of
Arkansas, addressed the issue
in a study published in the Jour-
nal of Adolescent Health last
January.
In the study, titled "Mental
Health Problems and Help-
See MENTAL HEALTH, Page 6

IN MEMORY
SACUA member, SI
Prof. Frost dies at 58

Students create
Relay for Life team
in Frost's honor
By HALEY GLATTHORN
and KAITLIN WILLIAMS
Daily StaffReporters
Robert Frost, a respected
associate professor in the School
of Information and member of

the Univer-
sity's lead
faculty gov-
erning body,
passed away
on Saturday
in his Ann '
Arbor home FROST
after battling
colon cancer. He was 58 years
old.
School of Information Dean
Jeffrey MacKie-Mason wrote

in a statement released by the
school yesterday that Frost was
an influential professor who had
a significant impact on the lives
of many undergraduates.
"Many (students) say that he
had a transformative impact
on their choice of major and
career," MacKie-Mason wrote.
"Bob was passionate about
teaching, about his students,
and about our school."
See FROST, Page 7

AROUND ANN ARBOR
Power outage causes State Street
area businesses to shut down early

The new version of Four Loko sold at 7-Eleven on South State Street yesterday.
Decaffeinated version of Four Loko
returns to Ann Arbor store shelves

DTE expected
power to be restored
this morning
By RACHEL BRUSSTAR
and BRANDON SHAW
DailfStaffReporters
Restaurants and other busi-
nesses in the South State Street

area were forced to close their
doors early last night when a
power surge left them in the
dark.
DTE Energy spokesman John
Austerberry said in an inter-
view last night that the outage
impacted mostly parts of East
Liberty Street, East Washington
Street and South State Street
and began at about 7:20 p.m. due
to an underground cable failure.

About 200 DTE customers were
affected, Austerberry said, add-
ing that he was unsure how long
it would take the company to fix
the issue.
"We have crews working on
it and really can't say with many
great degree of certainty when
we'll make the restoration, but
they're working on it tonight,
and they aren't going to stop
See POWER, Page 7

Alcoholic energy
drinks banned by
state in November
By BRIENNE PRUSAK
Daily StaffReporter
A non-caffeinated ver-
sion of Four Loko has legally
found its way back onto con-
venience store shelves after
being banned in Michigan last
November.

The old version of the drink
- sometimes referred to as
"blackout in a can" - was
banned by the Michigan Liquor
Control Commission because
its , mix of alcohol and caf-
feine was deemed dangerous
to consumers. The beverage
contained about as much alco-
hol as four beers and the same
amount of caffeine as three to
four cups of coffee.
A press release issued in
November by Phusion Projects
- the company that makes Four

Loko - stated that the original
Four Loko product was safe
since drinks like rum and cola
have been around for years
without contention. The com-
pany also stressed that it clearly
prints the alcohol content and
warnings on every item it sells
and that it isn't in the business
of selling dangerous products.
According to the Phusion
Projects website, the company
decided to remove caffeine,
guarana and taurine from its
See FOUR LOKO, Page 7

WEATHER HI: 43
TOMORROW LO: 26

GOT A NEWS TIP? NEW ON MICHIGANDAILIYM
Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail Experts anticipate influx of crows on campus
news@michigandaily.com and let us know. MICHIGANDAILY.COM/BLOGS/THE WIRE

INDEX
Vol. CXXI, No.119
02011 The Michigan Daily
michiondaiiy.com

AP NEWS.....................3 ARTS ...........................5
SUDOKU......................3 NEWS......................6
OPINION-...................4 SPORTS ...................8

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