100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 23, 2011 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2011-03-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I THE GRADING SCALE THE DAILY'S PICKS
Breaking down the grades for the WeendorseMForward candidate
easiest and toughest University DeAndree Watson and Brendan
departments. Campbell for MSA's top positions
*)INSIDE a PAGE 4A
Ije Ifiljiga0n &I Ij

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Wednesday, March 23, 2011

michigandaily.com

ART AS AN OUTLET

UNIVERSITY FACULTY
'U' Senate in
favor of new
tenure-clock
pause plan

JED MOCH/Daily
TOP LEFT: Buzz Alexander, founder and director of the Prison Creative Arts Project, speaks at the opening of the 16th annual Exhibition of Art by Michigan
Prisoners at the Duderstadt Center Gallery yesterday. BOTTOM LEFT: Ann Arbor residents at the exhibit. RIGHT: A work titled "Corporate" by R. Horeczy.
2010 U.S. CENSUS
4 Census shows populati
A2stable, but falls in Detroit

to
ext
By
Wh
meeti
dry a
eye a
Salmc
of pol
his d
last m
Sal
group
- con
fessor
time
andf
Unive
after 1
accou
sity's
"Cr
ibility
stanc
beyon
accou
Salmc

Members vote In recent months, the ten-
ure clock, which is the window
support break of time when a faculty member
can be granted tenure, has been
ension from one a source of contention between
University administrators and
to two years faculty members. At its meet-
ing Monday afternoon, the Uni-
KAITLIN WILLIAMS versity Senate voted on several
Daily Staff Reporter action items regarding proposed
changes to the University's ten-
sile University Senate ure policy.
ngs are usually cut-and- The University Senate voted
ffairs, there wasn't a dry 83-35 to endorse a proposed
n the room when Robert amendment to the Standard
ond, an assistant professor Practice Guide. This would
itical science, spoke about allow faculty members a two-
aughter who passed away year hiatus on their tenure clock
sonth. while also expanding permis-
mond explained to the sible reasons for such stoppages.
of about 120 members Currently, the University only
mprised of University pro- allows a one-year halt on the
rial faculty, librarians, full- clock.
research faculty, deans Salmond said he told his story
executive officers of the to the University.Senate to high-
rsity - how his situation light the importance of support-
his daughter's death wasn't ing the proposed amendment.
nted for under the Univer- As Salmond explained, the
tenure-clock policy. loss of his daughter placed him
urrently, there is no flex- in a difficult situation that he
for that set of circum- felt warranted special consid-
es, which I (admit) were eration from the University.
ad my control, to be taken He added that there should be
nt of in my tenure clock," increased understanding on the
and said. See TENURE, Page 3A

Detroit lost
25 percent of
residents in decade
By ADAM RUBENFIRE
Daily StaffReporter
Though several municipali-
ties across Michigan may see
changes in state or federal
funding they receive due to

dips in population sizes, Ann
Arbor is most likely not one of
them.
The results of the U.S. Cen-
sus, which were released yes-
terday, show that though Ann
Arbor's population has not sub-
stantially changed in the last 10
years, the population in Washt-
enaw County has increased by
about 7 percent. But a more sig-
nificant change has occurred in
Detroit, where the city's popula-

tion diminished by 25 percent in
the past decade.
While its population has
remained fairly constant, Ann
Arbor has moved up from the
seventh to the sixth largest city
in the state.
Lisa Neidert, senior research
associate inthe Population Stud-
ies Center at the University's
Institute for Social Research,
said the population changes
were mostly expected and there

was nothing "real earth shatter-
ing" about Ann Arbor's results.
However, Neidert said a
closer examination of Ann
Arbor would most likely reveal
significant changes about the
population. She pointed to racial
dynamics in the city as a key
area of interest for her, saying
she plans to analyze if the His-
panic and Asian populations
have increased.
See CENSUS, Page 3A

STUDENT GOVERNMENT ELECTIONS
Polling stations to be used
for first time in 10 years

LSA-SG candidates uncontested

Voting method
aimed at raising
voter turnout
By ROBIN VEECK
Daily StaffReporter
Students casting their bal-
lots in student government
elections today and tomorrow
will be able to do so at various
locations around campus - not
just in front of their laptop.
In addition to voting online,

ballots can be cast at polling
stations in University resi-
dence halls and other locations
on campus - a voting method
the Michigan Student Assem-
bly and LSA Student Govern-
ment last employed more than
a decade ago. The added option
is in an effort to increase low
voter turnout and avoid digi-
tal problems that have plagued
student government elections
in years past.
In studentgovernment elec-
tions this past fall, roughly 10
percent of the University stu-

dent body voted. Last year's
MSA elections drew voter
participation from 14 percent
of the student body. How-
ever, voter turnout had previ-
ously been lower - with 12.8
percent of students voting in
winter 2009 and 6.4 percent of
students voting in the winter
2008 elections.
"When it shifted over from
voting stations to online vot-
ing, we kind of lost a couple
people," LSA junior Breah Pat-
terson, MSA's election direc-
See POLLING, Page 3A

Platform aims to
address concerns of
LSA students
By RACHEL BRUSSTAR
Daily StaffReporter
After spending five semesters
on the LSA Student Government,
LSA juniors Anne Laverty and
Jeff Larkin have their sights on
the organization's top positions.
Laverty and Larkin, who are
running uncontested for LSA-
SG president and vice president,
respectively, in the elections
today and tomorrow, are stress-
ing the importance of making
sure the voices of LSA students
are heard and valued by their
governing body.

LSA juniors Anne Laverty and Jeff Larkin pose for a portrait yesterday.

Laverty and Larkin became
active members of LSA-SG dur-
ing the second semester of their
freshman year and currently

hold positions on the body's
executive board as secretary and
treasurer, respectively.
See LSA-SG, Page 3A

LSA-SG seeks to add $1 to fees

PATROLLING CAMPUS POLICE
DPS Oversight Cmte. lacks student interest

Increase in funding
would affect all
student gov'ts
By BRANDON SHAW
For the Daily
Students may have to reach
into their pockets for an extra
dollar if an LSA Student Gov-
ernment initiative passes in

this week's election.
Appearing on the Michigan
Student Assembly election bal-
lot today and tomorrow, LSA-
SG is proposing an increase
from $1.50 to $2.50 in student
dues paid per semester to vari-
ous colleges at the University.
LSA-SG officials estimate the
$1 increase per student will
result in an additional $18,000
for each school's budget.
LSA-SG President Steven

Benson, who spearheaded the
initiative, said 85 percent of
LSA-SG's budget goes directly
to student groups and event
planning. The other 15 percent
is reserved for internal com-
mittee use and discretionary
spending.
The amount that University
students payto their respective
colleges hasn't been increased
since 1998, when the amount
See FEES, Page 3A

State law violated
if two student
positions not filled
By ZACH BERGSON
Daily StaffReporter
Two student seats on the Uni-
versity's Department of Safety
Oversight Committee are up for
grabs this semester. But only one

student, LSA
junior Ellen
Steele, is slat-
ed to run for
the elected
position.
Since
she's uncon-
tested, Steele
is expected

STEELE

the end of the semester, the com-
mittee will be in violation of state
law.
The DPS Oversight Commit-
tee is an advisory group that
makes recommendations to the
administration about grievances
filed against DPS officers. State
law mandates that the commit-
tee consist of two students, two
University faculty members and
two University staff members,
See DPS, Page 3A

to win one of the student spots.
However, if another student isn't
elected to the twin position by

WEATHER HI 31
TOMORROW LO: 18

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

NEW ON MICHIGANDAILY.COM
Seeing Red: Big Libyan mistake
MICHIGANDAILY.COM/BLOGS/THE PODIUM

INDEX
Vol. CXXI, No. 115
021t The Michigan Daily
michigondoily.com

NEW S .......................3A ARTS.................. 6A
OPINION.....................4A SPORTS ................ 8A
AP NEWS ...................5A THE STATEMENT........1B

i

0

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan