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March 22, 2011 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2011-03-22

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~Ije 1Iid0ian &tIj

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tuesday, March 22, 2011

michigandaily.com

ANN ARBOR CITY COUNCIL
* First reading of
* pot ordinance
approved by A2
City Council
Second reading to cation of personalized alpha-
numeric identification - which
occur after period encompasses numbers and letter
- for the recipient and the dis-
for public input pensary would have to be con-

By K.C. WASSMAN
Daily StaffReporter
After months of discus-
sions and revisions to the city's
proposed medical marijuana
ordinance, the Ann Arbor City
Council approved the first
reading of the ordinance last
night.
Included in the updated ordi-
nance - which was postponed
five times previously - were
two amendments proposed by
Council members Sabra Briere
(D-Ward 1) and Sandi Smith
(D-Ward 1). The changes con-
cerned medical marijuana
packaging and how the current
estimated 15 medical marijuana
dispensaries in the area would
be relicensed under the new
ordinance.
Democratic Mayor John
Hieftje said the council will
have a second reading on the
ordinance next month.
In regard to the packaging of
medical marijuana, the weight
of the medicine and the appli-

sidered. Briere said this method
of identification is intended for
record keeping and to provide
a substantial tie between the
patient and caregiver.
Chuck Ream, owner of Med-
MAR Pharmaceuticals Inc., a
medical marijuana dispensary
on Packard Road, spoke at the
meeting and said this method
of identification is better than
other alternatives.
"It's an improvement to use
an alphanumeric ID rather than
our state ID numbers," Ream
said.
Along with these identifica-
tions, the contact information
for the dispensary would be
provided on the package, Briere
said. This allows the patient to
contact the provider with any
questions.
"It's the link between the
patient and the caregiver that's
such a vital thing here," Briere
said.
In addition to the clause
on marijuana packaging, an
amendment was included that
See CITY COUNCIL, Page 7

University President Mary Sue Coleman and Michael Finney, president and CEO of the Michigan Economic Development Corporation, take part in a University
Research Corridor panel discussion in Novi, Mich. yesterday. The panel members talked about the URC's past and future roles in economic growth in the state.
Amid budget cutst URC
coalition fosters growth,

Coleman, university
presidents discuss
research milestones
By KAITLIN WILLIAMS
Daily StaffReporter
NOVI, Mich. - University of
Michigan President Mary Sue
Coleman and Michigan State
University President Lou Anna

Simon joked yesterday about the
heated competition between the
two universities' sports teams.
Despite the athletic rivalry,
the presidents agreed the Uni-
versity Research Corridor - a
research partnership between
the University of Michigan,
Michigan State University and
Wayne State University - is one
way the universities succeed
together.
"... It's not about a final score

like a sporting event," Simon
said. "It is about us celebrating
the differences that we have and
the way they can collaborate."
Coleman added that healthy
competition between the two
schools and the ultimate collab-
oration they share through the
URC benefit both institutions.
"I think the competition
among us actually makes us
better individually," said Cole-
man to an audience of about 100

business leaders and other state
university officials at a panel
discussion in Novi, Mich. yes-
terday.
Coleman, Simon together and
WSU President Allan Gilmour
and Michael Finney, president
and CEO of the Michigan Eco-
nomic Development Corpora-
tion, came together to discuss
the collaboration of the three
universities through the URC
See URC, Page 3

UNIVERSITY MEPICAL SCHOOL
Medical School students
get top residency choices

'U' students have
99-percent match
rate for second year
By CLAIRE GOSCICKI
Daily StaffReporter
Many of the University Medi-
cal School's fourth-year students
breathed a sigh of relief after

receiving their placement in resi-
dency programs last week.
Announced discreetly on a
single slip of paper in a plain
white envelope last Thursday on
what is called "Match Day", each
placement signifies the hospital
where a student will work and
complete medical training for
the next three to seven years of
his or her life.
For Medical School student

Lauren Ehrlichman, who plans
to specialize in orthopedic sur-
gery, moving home to Boston
to begin her residency at the
four hospitals associated with
the Harvard Medical School
couldn't be more thrilling.
"Opening my envelope was an
incredible rush of emotion," she
said. "In one day, your whole life
changes."
See RESIDENCY, Page 7

Defend Affirmative Action Party candidates LSA freshman Briana Hatcher (left) and LSA sophomore Lena Cintron,
who are running for Michigan Student Assembly president and vice president, pose for a portrait yesterday.
Defend Affirmative Action Party running
mates stress diversity and unity on campus

PANEL DISCUSSION
Experts reflect on impact of
natural disasters in Japan

MSA candidates
hope to up support
for immigrants,
assault victims
By RACHEL BRUSSTAR
Daily StaffReporter
LSA freshman Briana Hatch-
er and LSA sophomore Lena
Cintron hope to become the first
members of the Defend Affirma-
tive Action Party to hold execu-
tive positions on the Michigan

Student Assembly.
To achieve this goal, Hatcher
and Cintron, who are running as
MSA president and vice presi-
dent candidates, respectively,
are running on a platform of
increasing diversity on cam-
pus and making the University
a more inclusive environment.
Their campaign, which will cul-
minate tomorrow with the start
of MSA elections, has been cen-
tered on reaching out to minor-
ity students and individuals who
have felt voiceless at the Univer-
sity.
"Our platform is basically

centered around diversity
because we think that the Uni-
versity needs to become more
diverse, and it needs to pay
more attention to the minority
students and the problems that
are going on and we just feel
that we can help," Hatcher said.
"We can be more approachable
to students of minority descent,
and we can take on the issues for
minority students, as well as the
non-minority students."
Hatcher and Cintron will be
running against MForward's
presidential candidate DeAn-
See RUNNING MATES, Page 3

Prof
ear
e
Whil
afterma
the Mat
the scie
to ans
of how

Fs. talk science of of those magnitudes occurred and
how they will affect people in the
thquake, future future.
To address these concerns, Ken
ffects abroad Ito, director of the University's
Center for Japanese Studies, orga-
By NEHA GARG nized a presentation yesterday
For the Daily afternoon at the Michigan League
to inform members of the campus
e people are coping with the community on various aspects of
ath of the disaster caused by the tragedy.
rch it earthquake in Japan, The presentation consisted of
rntific community is trying five panelists from different aca-
wer the difficult questions demic disciplines who attempted
an earthquake and tsunami to explain the struggles involved in

the unfolding events.
Lester Monts, the University's
senior vice provost for academic
affairs, said the earthquake juxta-
poses human species and their abil-
ity to cope with nature.
"There is much to learn," Monts
said to a crowd of about 150 people.
Mahshid Abir, a research fellow
and clinical lecturer in emergency
medicine at the University Medi-
cal School, discussed the various
health aspects and some of the con-
sequences of the natural disasters.
See JAPAN, Page 3

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