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March 15, 2011 - Image 2

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9

2 - Tuesday, March 15, 2011

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

...........

Che Michigan Daily
420 Maynard St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1327
www.michigandaily.com
STEPHANIE STEINBERG BRAD WILEY
Editor in Chief Business Manager
734-418-4115 ext. 1252 734-418-4115 ext. 1241
steinberg@michigandaily.com tmdbusiness@gmail.com

Fast food places vetted by'U'

Despite several fast
food options in University
Unions, students may not be
able to order some of their
favorite eats, like an Arby's
roast beef sandwich or this
season's Shamrock Shake
from McDonald's, without
taking a drive off campus.
Though the University
doesn't have any provisions
that prohibit competing
establishments from set-
ting up shop on campus,
vendors typically opt out
of moving into the same
facilities as their major com-
petitors, according to Uni-
versity spokeswoman Kelly
Cunningham.
However, there have
CRIME NOTES

been exceptions. McDon-
ald's occupied the space now
filled by Panda Express in
Pierpont Commons while
Wendy's was concurrently
operating in the Michigan
Union. And currently, Sub-
way and Quiznos are both
contracted with the Uni-
versity in the Union and
Pierpont Commons, respec-
tively, despite being compet-
ing vendors, according to
Cunningham.
The University's pro-
cess of determining which
restaurants will come to
campus is a lengthy one,
Cunningham wrote in an
e-mail interview.
Whenever a contract with

a food vendor ends, existing
vendors may submit a pro-
posal to expand their loca-
tions on campus. Outside,
vendors are also encouraged
to compete for the space,
Cunningham wrote.
A committee of students
and staff review the poten-
tial vendors' proposals and
judge them based on their
product quality, customer
service and operator expe-
rience, among other things,
according to Cunningham. z
The evaluation process often
includes trips to off campus
locations to judge the restau- ANiELLt TOLL/Oai
rants' quality, she wrote. LSA junior TI Scott and Subway employee Zanthus Al-lateef (right) make
sandwiches for Engineering junior Andrew Roach, LSA freshman Mary
-DEVONTHORSBY Reid and Education junior Tricia Bradley at the Michigan Union yesterday.
CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES - EE THIY

Newsroom
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Card swiped Falling object Information on Gulf of Mexico
WHERE: Mary Markley takes trash out medical school oil spill lecture
Residence Hall
WHEN: Sunday at about WHERE: Alice Lloyd Hall WHAT: Members from WHAT: Donald Boesch, a
4:15 p.m. Residence Hall the Career Center will member of the Presidential
WHAT: A female student WHEN: Saturday at about discuss the application Oil Spill Commission, will
reported her wallet was 7:30 p.m. process, medical school discuss lessons learned
stolen and charges were WHAT: A student reported options and provide a from the Gulf oil spill.
made to a credit card, Uni- that a trash can was dam- forum for networking with WHO: Exhibit Museum of
versity Police reported. The aged when something may schools. About 25 schools Natural History
student could not remember have been thrown from the are expected to attend the WHEN: Today at 5 p.m.
when the card was stolen. fifth floor, University Police event. WHERE: Exhibit Museum
1 reported. There are no sus- WHO: The Career Center of Natural History

Snack time

pects, but similar reports

WHEN: Today at 3 p.m.
W HER E: Michicran Union.

nave been made in the past. g
Shakedown second floor
Double trouble
WHERE: West Quad Resi- Senior viola
dent Hall WHERE: Bursley Resi-
WHEN: Saturday at about dence Hall performance
11n n WH EN. S dn tb hnnt

ll,

1p.m.
WHAT: Three male stu-
dents were found shaking
vending machines, Univer-
sity Police reported. They
were able to remove some
items.

r n: 3unuay at au
3:30 a.m.
WHAT: Two male visi-
tors who appeared drunk
were found in the hallway,
University Police reported.
They were issued MIPs.

WHAT: Erin Nelson will
perform her senior recital.
The program includes
music from Bach, Fritz and
Clarke.
WHO: School of Music,
Theatre & Dance
WHEN: Tonight at 7 p.m.
WHERE: University
Commons, room 817

Film screening
WHAT: A showing of
"Google Baby," a film about
how societies use technol-
ogy for reproduction.
WHO: Center for Ethics in
Public Life
WHEN: Tonight at 7 p.m.
WHERE: University of
Michigan Museum of Art
CORRECTIONS
. Please report any
error in the Daily to
corrections@michi-
gandaily.com.

Al-Queda has created a
women's magazine called
Al-Shamikha, meaning
The Majestic Woman, the
Daily Mail reported. Nick-
named "Jihad Cosmo" by its
critics, the magazine praises
acts of suicide bombing and
encourages readers to take
part.
The Michigan women's
basketball team failed
to earn a bid to the
NCAA Tournament yester-
day, more than a week after
losing its first Big Ten Tour-
nament game.
>> FOR MORE, SEE SPORTS, PAGE 6
A train derailed in
Tama County, Iowa
yesterday, spilling ten
railcars filled with cheese
and yogurt, ABC News
reported. There were no
injuries, but hazmat crews
cleaned a small amount of
spilled Diesel fuel.

EDITORIAL STAFF
Kyle Swanson Managing Editor swanson@michigandaily.com
NicoleAber ManagingNewsEditor aber@michigandaily.con
SENIORNEWSEDITORS:BethanyBiron,DylanCinti,CaitlinHuston,JosephLicbterman,
Devon Thorsby
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITORS:Rachel Brusstar, ClaireGoscicki, Suzanne Jacobs, Mike
Merar,Michele Narov, Brienne Prusak,Kaitlin Williams
MichelleDwitrand opinioneditors@michigandaily.com
EnilylOrley tditorial PagetEditnrs
SENIOR EDITORIAL PAGEEDITORS:.AidaAli,AshleyGriesshammer,HarshaPanduranga
ASSISTANT EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS: HarsahaNata, AndrewWeiner
Tim ROhan and sportseditors@michigandaily.com
Nick Spar ManagingSports Editors
SENIOR SPORTS EDITORS: Mark Burns, MichaelFlorek, Chantel Jennings, Ryan Kartje,
Stephen J. Nesbitt, Zak Pyzik
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITORS: Emily Bonchi, Ben Estes, Casandra Pagni, Luke Pasch,
KevinRaftery,MattSlovin
SharonJacobs ManagingArtsEditor jacobs@michigandaily.com
SENIOR ARTS EDITORS: Leah Burgin, Kavi Pandey, Jennifer Xu
ASSISTANT ARTS EDITORS: Joe Cadagin, Emma Gase,Proma Khosla, David Tao
Marissa McClain and photo@michigandaily.com
Jed MOch ManagingPhoto Editors
ASSnANT HOnTO EDITORS: Erin Kirkland, Salam Rida, Chris Ryba, Anna Schulte,
Zach Bergson and design@michigandaily.com
Helen ieblich Managing DesigntEditors
SENIOR DESIGNEDITOR:Maya Friedman
ASSISTANT DESIGN EDITORS: AlexBondy, Hermes Risien
Carolyn Klarecki MagazineEditor klarecki@michigandaily.com
DEPUTY MAGAZINE EDITORS: Stephen Ostrowski, Elyana Twiggs
Esh Healyand y s copydesk@michigandaily.com
Eileen Fallen topytChiefs
Sarah Squire Web Development Manager squire@michigandaily.com
BUSINESS STAFF
Julianna Crim sales Manager
SALES FORCE MANAGER: StephanieBowker
Hillary Soawala ClassifiedsManager
CL SIFIEDASSISTANT ANAGER: Ardie Reed
Alexis Newton Production Manager
Meghan Rooney Layout Manager
Nick Meshkin Finance Manager
Zach Yancer Web Project Coordinator
The Michigan Daily OSSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Fridayduring the fall and
winter terms by students at the University of Michigan. Onencopynis avaiable free of charge
to ali readers.Additional copiesmay be picked up at the Daily's office for $2.Subscriptions for
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The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and The Associated Collegiate Press.

SNYDER
From Page 1
night and was created by LSA
senior Zach Goldsmith, who has
planned a Diag protest sched-
uled for tomorrow.
Snyder's proposed budget for
the 2012 fiscal year cuts funding
to Michigan's public universities
by 15 percent. This number will
be even higher if schools don't
cap tuition increases for in-
state students at 7.1 percent. In
such an event, the University's
state funding would decrease by
about 20 percent.
With a 15-percent reduction
in state dollars, the Univer-
sity would get nearly $47.5 mil-
lion less than what it currently
receives - $316 million. And if
the University faces a 20-per-
cent decrease in state funding, it
would see a $61.5 million decline
in state funds.
Burance and Ashlee Lori Will,
a junior at the University's Dear-
born campus who is not cur-
rently enrolled, said they plan to

attend the University's Board of
Regents Meeting on Thursday to
address the regents on the issue
and try to persuade them to
choose another commencement
speaker.
Burance said he hopes to
present the Board with a peti-
tion signed by 2,000 to 3,000
students who support changing
the speaker. Students from sev-
eral campus groups and orga-
nizations, such as members of
co-operative housing and the
University's chapter of Col-
lege Democrats, have expressed
negative opinions about the
prospect of Snyder speaking,
Burance said.
But other students, like LSA
sophomore Vinh Phung, said
they expect the speech to be an
interesting opportunity to hear
Snyder's perspective.
"(He) has some controver-
sial ideas," Phung said. "It will
be good to get his ideas out. We
should be open to everybody, not
so close-minded."
Lori Will has begun organiz-
ing a protest set to occur during

the commencement ceremony if
the speaker isn't changed. She
said she and other protestors
would bring signs and "make as
much noise as possible" outside
Michigan Stadium during Sny-
der's speech.
"We're not looking to destroy
the commencement (ceremony)
and the achievement that the
students have made by get-
ting their degrees," Lori Will
said. " ... At this point, it's early
on, (but) I have a feeling we're
going to get an immense amount
of support from an immense
amount of organizations and
people."
The city of Ann Arbor
requires that protestors obtain
a permit 60 working days prior
to the event. Lori Will said she
has contacted the American
Civil Liberties Union for assis-
tance.
Burance expressed his disap-
pointment that the focus of com-
mencement has shifted too far
toward politics instead of repre-
senting the achievements of the
students.

"People who feel strongly
about the state and the Univer-
sity would be great speakers,"
Burance said. "With the gover-
nor, I don't think he feels that
same way."
Burance and Lori Will each
said their disapproval of the
University's choice doesn't stem
from political affiliation but
from Snyder's plan to cut higher
education funding.
However, other students feel
more positively about Snyder's
upcoming speech.
"Obama (is) a hard act to fol-
low. I think it's the next best
thing," Business School senior
Alecos Nicolaou said. "He's well
known (and) an (alum). I think
(he's) a good choice."
LSA sophomore Adrianna
Katsimpalis said she thinks Sny-
der could have a positive impact
on the ceremony.
"He's obviously still an impor-
tant political figure," Katsim-
palis said. "There's no way
anyone was going to compare to
Obama. It's an interesting con-
trast."

REGENTS
From Page 1
zations in the Business School,
said in an interview last month
that she is thrilled to be coming
to Ann Arbor.
"The three things I'm most
excited about are the amazing
faculty, the world-class programs
and, of course, the (University)
itself - a great University with so
many great programs," she said.
REGENTS TO CONSIDER
RENOVATIONS TO
UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL
The University Hospital will
likely get the green light to pro-
ceed with a $6 million renovation
and expansion to its Medical Pro-
cedure Unit.
The construction plan includes
a 4,000-square-foot expansion to
the unit and a 2,200-square-foot
renovation of a nearby storage
space, according to a communica-
tion to the regents by Ora Pesco-
vitz, the University's executive
vice president for medical affairs,
and Timothy Slottow, the Uni-
versity's executive vice president
and chief financial officer.
The renovation and expan-
sion will add new preparatory
and recovery bays, something
the hospital is currently lacking,
Pescovitz and Slottow wrote in
-the communication.
"The medical procedure unit
(MPU) at University Hospital
has a ratio of 2.3 prep/recovery
bays per procedure room, well
below the industry standard of
four to one, hindering patient

throughput," Pescovitz and Slot-
tow wrote.
The project will also create
procedure rooms and storage
space, in addition to upgrading
and renovating the waiting room.
The project,whichwill take place
in several phases, is scheduled to
be finished in spring2012.
REGENTS TO
APPROVE SALE OF
COMMERCIAL PAPER
The regents are also expected
to approve the sale of up to $200
million in commercial paper to
replace the current commercial
paper program that is expiring
Commercial paper are short-
term debts the University sells to
investors in order to finance con-
struction projects. The Univer-
sity is obligated to pay back the
debt in at least 270 days.
According to a communication
to the regents written by Slottow,
the previous series of commer-
cial paper issuances expired in
November 2009.
"The existing commercial
paper program needs to be
replaced by a new program to
allow short-term funding of
capital projects financed by tax-
exempt debt and refunding of
outstandingdebt," Slottowwrote.
The funds generated from sell-
ing the commercial paper could
be used to fund several construc-
tion projects around campus,
Slottow wrote. These projects
include renovations to Alice
Lloyd Residence Hall, Crisler
Arena and the C.S. Mott Chil-
dren's and Von Not Voil Voigt-
lander Women's Hospitals.

0
0

Fourth Annual
GramlichSHOWCASE
of Student Work
WEDNESDAY, MARCH I6, 2011
4:00 - 6:o P.M.
Poster session. Free and open to the public.
Reception to follow.
Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy
Weill Hall, ist and 2nd floors
735 S. State Street, Ann Arbor, MI

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