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March 07, 2011 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2011-03-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

UoIidyganchIa i0j
________________Monday, March 7, 2011

* Ann Arbor, Michigan

michigandaily.com

STATE BUDGET
Coleman
talks higher
ed. budget
before cmte.

'U' to receive
less funding if it
exceeds tuition cap
By JOSEPH LICHTERMAN
Daily News Editor
LANSING - Since he took
office in January, Republican
Gov. Rick Snyder has repeatedly
spoken about the "shared sac-
rifice" required to right Michi-
gan's economy and balance the

state's budget. In . response,
University President Mary Sue
Coleman and presidents from
other public universities across
the state have been prepar-
ing for potential cuts to higher
education funding, while still
emphasizing the importance of
higher education to the state's
long-term fiscal health.
Snyder's budget proposal
calls for a 15-percent across-
the-board cut to the state's high-
er education appropriations. But
See TUITION, Page SA

MARISSA MCCLAIN/Daily
Michigan men's basketball coach John Beilein celebrates after a 70-63 win over in-state rival Michigan State on Saturday, March 5. Freshman guard Tim Hardaway
Jr. led the Wolverines with 20 points in their victory over the Spartans. For more coverage of the game see SportsMonday, inside.
CHANGES FROM LANSING
Mich igan to crack down on
student Bridge Card abuse

Stricter guidelines
for eligability to
take effect April 1
By HALEY GLATTHORN
Daily Staff Reporter
Thousands of college stu-
dents in Michigan may soon
no longer be eligible to receive
nearly $200 in federal tax

money each month to buy food.
While many students depend
on the money for meals, for
others this may just mean the
elimination of superfluous pur-
chases like late night pizza and
caffeinated beverages.
The Michigan Department
of Human Services will be
cracking down on abuse of the
Michigan Bridge Card program
- which provides federally
financed debit cards that can

be used for food expenses - by
establishing stricter qualifica-
tion guidelines that will take
effect April 1. Though state
officials intend for the program
to serve only those who are in
need, others find the new regu-
lations unwarranted.
Under the upcoming law,
Michigan residents are eligible
if they care for children, are
physically or mentally unfit for
employment or participate in

job training. Additionally, fed-
eral officials will evaluate pro-
gram applicants' income and
household size and will estab-
lish the amount of money an
individual is eligible to receive.
Michigan DHS Director
Maura Corrigan wrote in a Feb.
9 press release that the new
restrictions on Bridge Card use
will benefit those who need the
financial support it provides.
See BRIDGE CARDS, PageSA

VISUALIZING THE STATE BUDGET CUT
A 15-percent cut to higher educationfunding would result in alosstof $47.4 million* for the
University. Here are some comparisonsfto whatthe funding decrease would equal. Each image
tepresents 50 Inivensity of Michigan tuitions or the salaty of President Mary Sue toleman.
4,073.8 IN-STATE TUITIONS
1,325 OUT-OF-STATE TUITIONS
83.3 PRESIDENT MARY SUE COLEMAN SALARIES
-cations based on the rent academicyear andthe LSA lowerivson uto ae

AROUND ANN ARBOR IT'S A WALK-OFF
A2 law clinic offers support
for undocumented residents

Law students,
immigrants benefit
from program
By RACHEL BRUSSTAR
Daily StaffReporter
After crossing the Ciudad
Juarez-El Paso border with her
family in 1997, an undocumented
woman now living in Michigan

said she hoped to escape the vio-
lence and poverty in Mexico and
establish a new life in the United
States.
"We came here because the
violence was starting to get out
of hand, and we were really poor
down in Mexico," the woman,
who requested anonymity, said.
"Sometimes we didn't have any
food. My mom worked two jobs,
my dad worked two jobs and we
were barely making any money."

But when the woman's family
members were arrested in Mich-
igan as a result of their undocu-
mented immigration status last
November, she faced the possi-
bility of deportation and turned
to the Michigan Immigrant
Rights Center in Ann Arbor for
legal aid.
The MIRC is part of the Ann
Arbor-based Michigan Pov-
erty Law Program - a partner-
See LAW CLINIC, Page 6A

UNIVERSITY RESEARCH
New method employs digital
images to identify diseases

MARISSA MCCLAIN/Daily
Models rehearse for an annual fashion show to be held by NOiR, a fashion organization, in the Michigan Union on Sun-
day, March 27. Part of the proceeds for the show will go to The Yubbie Foundation, an anti-bullying organization.
CAMPUS BUILDINGS
Students, faculty complain of noises
disrupting classes in Dana Building

Technique to allow
for more effective
viewing of tissue
By CLAIRE GOSCICKI
Daily StaffReporter
Digitization and computer-
ized images will now help the
field of pathology with a new

technique developed by Univer-
sity researchers.
The innovative method,
called Spatially-Invariant Vec-
tor Quantization, will allow
pathologists to more accurately
and efficiently pinpoint signs of
disease. According to its devel-
opers, SIVQ carefully targets
signs of a disease, such as cell or
tissue abnormalities, by analyz-
ing digital images.

The findings were published
in the Journal of Pathology
Informatics online on Feb. 26.
Jason Hipp, co-lead author of
the findings, and contributing
author Ulysses Balis - both
pathologists at the University
Htespital - began working on
the SIVQ software's first algo-
rithm in the late '90s.
After a series of successes and
See DISEASES, Page SA

SNRE official says
administration is
unaware of sounds
By RAYZA GOLDSMITH
Daily Staff Reporter
A mysterious sound has been
emanating from the bowels of a
campus building. But this noise

isn't someone's stomach growl-
ing before lunch.
This sound is coming from
somewhere in the Dana Build-
ing on Central Campus. The
sound is so loud that students
and faculty with classes in the
buildingsaid ithas forced them
to temporarily halt lesson plans
and discussions.
Students taking classes - in
the Dana Building - which

houses the School of Natural
Resources and Environment -
have reported noises described
as "whiny" and "high-pitched"
that come intermittently.
But the source of the noise is
unclear, and building adminis-
trators say they have no record
of the sounds.
While administrators don't
acknowledge the noise, stu-
See DANA BUILDING, Page SA

WEATHER H I 41
TOMORROW LO: 34

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INDEX AP NEWS....................3A CLASSIFIEDS ....!........6A
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